Scaphoid fracture

Does anyone have any experience with this injury,(his pitching hand) I am hoping my son will be back in a month or 2.
Thank you

I have experience with this type of injury, and it was not fun. Mine however was a crack in the scaphoid, and not a fracture. Initally was told 4-6 weeks in a cast, they took it off then and re examined it, had to put the cast back on and in all it was 10 weeks in a cast. The bonus however was it was not my pitching hand and I was allowed to pitch with my cast on my other hand. Hope this helps. Am not sure if a fracture would heal quicker than a crack? But I do know that the bone is a floating bone.

your in luck…well not really.
your in luck becuase I can give you the straight dope on this fracture
I am an Orthopaedic tech at Mass general hospital.
the same guys that prolly put your son in the cast.

this is one of the MOST aggrivating fractures out there.
why?
it takes the longest to heal.
the schapoid actually gets it healthy blood supply on the way BACK to the heart. its one of the only bones in the body to do this.
which is why we see people in casts for extended amounts of time.

depending on what kind of Fx we are talking here, communuted, transverse, ect ect you might be looking at 2 months in a cast…maybe more.
I suggest a very healthy diet, no smoking (if he is older) and be very careful on the pain meds of choice, certain ones slow down healing even more.
usually tylenol is the way to go.
this is a goo oppertunity to work the OTHER arm.
and by NO MEANS should you play in the cast.
its there to hold the fracture in place, NOT protect the fracture.

hope this helps/
J

[quote=“djjc”]the schapoid actually gets it healthy blood supply on the way BACK to the heart. its one of the only bones in the body to do this.
which is why we see people in casts for extended amounts of time.

hope this helps/
J[/quote]

It’s not when it gets the blood flow that is the problem with a scaphoid fracture. Which is a crack btw. The problem is where it gets the blood flow from. It gets its flow from an artery that enters at the waist of the bone and travels from distal end to proximal. If fractured there the flow can be shut off to the proximal end of the bone resulting in avascular necrosis of the scaphoid bone.