Scap loading


#1

scap loading, i want to know about it and does it work?


#2

scap loading is a product of good mechaincs it means a thrusted chest out. So dont focus on it use good mechanics and you will have it.


#3

I agree.

It’s the EFFECT rather than the CAUSE of a good delivery.


#4

scap loading can cause injuries cant it? so why would it be associated with good mechanics, but i know a lot of pitchers do it


#5

i think it could cause injury if you try to do it instead of the body natuarly doing it.


#6

[quote=“RIstar”]i think it could cause injury if you try to do it instead of the body natuarly doing it.[/quote]theres really no difference, naturally or intentionally, because your doing it either way, its like throwing sidearm, you can do that naturally and intentionally, but either way, you have a risk of injury


#7

I think scap loading may cause injuries…

  1. If you don’t do it right. By right, I mean keeping the elbows below the level of the shoulders.

  2. If you actively try scap load rather than just let it happen. The scapula, and the muscles that attach to it, has a very important function of maintaining the integrity of the shoulder joint. My concern is that actively trying to do something with those muscles, rather than just letting them do what they naturally do, could cause problems.

Again, let me say that I DO see scap loading happening when I look at The Greats.

However, I believe that, like external rotation of the PAS upper arm, it is the EFFECT of a high speed delivery rather than the CAUSE of a high speed delivery.


#8

I’d like to know if there is anyone who actually endorses doing scap loading intentionally and whether there are any known injury cases where scap loading was determined to be the cause.


#9

Paul Nyman and Ron Wolforth talk a lot about scap loading and how pitchers need to actively work on it. I believe that Nyman advocates that it be done with the elbows above the level of the shoulders.

I believe that some of his supporters call this making the Inverted M.

To my knowledge, nobody has proved that scap loading this way is bad (but a major league team has bought into my theory).


#10

Do you have any additional insight into the “work on it” part? I feel pitchers do need to strengthen the muscles that pull the scapula back because I believe those same muscles help to decellerate the arm. Also, a lack of strength in those muscles is what leads to SICK Scapula Syndrome
http://www.throwinginjuries.com/sick.htm
.

But strengthening the muscles is much different than trying to do scap loading intentionally while pitching.


#11

Do you have any additional insight into the “work on it” part? I feel pitchers do need to strengthen the muscles that pull the scapula back because I believe those same muscles help to decellerate the arm. Also, a lack of strength in those muscles is what leads to SICK Scapula Syndrome
http://www.throwinginjuries.com/sick.htm
.

But strengthening the muscles is much different than trying to do scap loading intentionally while pitching.[/quote]

There are some videos at the bottom of the home page of Ron Wolforth’s site…

http://www.theathleticpitcher.com/

I haven’t looked at this page or program in depth, but I think it might not be bad (if a bit over-hyped).

From what I understand, Wolforth “borrowed” the basic ideas from Nyman who “borrowed” them from Marshall. That means they are pretty well vetted.

Marshall’s conditioning program is pretty much the only thing that Nyman likes out of all of Marshall’s stuff.

Of course, you could always cut out the middle man and check out Marshall’s conditioning stuff.


#12

Scapula loading is a term that can and does get clouded by semantics over and over again. In part the ideology behind ths is to “set” a stable base for the shoulder to articulate upon, which is a critcal function that the scap plays in throwers. A unstable or unbalanced scapula could eventually lead a pitcher to injury. In very general terms the rythym and timing in which the shoulder/scapula work together is critical for maintaining a stable base for which the shoulder articulates. Once this is upset in one way or another the communication that the body needs to send/recieve to itself gets muddled. Upsetting the timing thus upsetting the order in which some of the cuff muscles fires, hence the term “scapular dykineisis”. We all know that the cuff is repsonsible for holding the shoulder in the socket. This can only happen if the firing order of these muscles is correct. We all know how some of these work against each other but in unison to help stabalize the shoulder and keep it within the glenoid. Since the throwing motion is a kinetic chain which passes one link to the other it only stands to reason if the link the scap passes to the shoulder is incorrect than the entire syncing action is not right, this is what can lead to an injury. I suggest those interested look into "scapular dykineisis [sp]] and its role with throwers. Pay attention to what the litature has to say about the thoracic wall and how the scapula sets itself creating a stable base for the shoulder to rotate. Pay attention to the key words one being “retraction” as well as upward/back rotations of the scap. Like all drills, scap drills and strengthening excercises are designed so that this will eventually happen all on its own. Some do it quite naturally others do not. Some of you need to take what D.M. said in another post to heart. This was in regards to what one poster had to say about Freddy Garcia and his arm action to which D.M. replied maybe he can still do it “in spite” of versus because of. This was typed in a verbatum manner, I do not have D.M.s exact wording but you all should get the gyst. Just because a person has success doing something in a certain fashion does NOT always make it right for all.


#13

Thanks for that info, chin!


#14

my physical therapist said that scap loading is important, but try not to change the delivery to much just make sure you have some chest thrust.


#15

alright well im not going to work on this to much then…i really dont want to risk injury as a freshman right now…thanks everyone