Salt Tablets


#1

I was asked by a neighbor who has a son playing college ball down south, if I recommended talking salt tablets before a game that’s being played in very hot weather?

I answered this way:
I’m not a big fan of issuing salt tablets, or, seeing my pitchers taking them. Salt ( sodium) is part of the body’s electrolyte balance mechanism, and as such, is a delicate balancing act that the body itself is trying to maintain. Besides, other things can enter the picture.

For example, about sweat - where the body gives off water, along with sodium and other things. The body is trying to cool itself, and balance its electrolyte chemistry all at the same time.

Our bodies are really unique at doing this and surprising well too. But, proper hydration prior, during and after intense physical activity is the key. A well balanced diet, expressly related to the demands of baseball - with weight and health issues mixed in, is the smart way to train. Considering sport’s drinks is something to consider - but age and level of maturity should be looked at first.

Sports drinks have come a very long way, and when used properly in addition to understanding why, is one path to take.

Anyone want to jump in here and contribute?

Coach B.


#2

[quote=“Coach Baker”]I was asked by a neighbor who has a son playing college ball down south, if I recommended talking salt tablets before a game that’s being played in very hot weather?

I answered this way:
I’m not a big fan of issuing salt tablets, or, seeing my pitchers taking them. Salt ( sodium) is part of the body’s electrolyte balance mechanism, and as such, is a delicate balancing act that the body itself is trying to maintain. Besides, other things can enter the picture.

For example, about sweat - where the body gives off water, along with sodium and other things. The body is trying to cool itself, and balance its electrolyte chemistry all at the same time.

Our bodies are really unique at doing this and surprising well too. But, proper hydration prior, during and after intense physical activity is the key. A well balanced diet, expressly related to the demands of baseball - with weight and health issues mixed in, is the smart way to train. Considering sport’s drinks is something to consider - but age and level of maturity should be looked at first.

Sports drinks have come a very long way, and when used properly in addition to understanding why, is one path to take.

Anyone want to jump in here and contribute?

Coach B.[/quote]
Coach B.,
I honestly believe that the most overlooked part of all sports in nutrition, with that said, hydration is the most overlooked part of the nutrition! People don’t honestly drink enough water to do themselves good. I am drinking a gallon a day, and it does wonders keeping me healthy and keeping away the soreness. A regular person should drink a gallon of water a day, and this is not including what you drink during workouts. In fact, you don’t actually need a sports drink if you workout less than an hour, if you are in a game, then stick with the water the first hour, then go to a sports drink to replenish where needed.

Now with a diet, this is equally as important. If you look at how many people eat and drink, you will find that soda and other drinks with either carbonation or caffeine are a big part of the diet. It should not be this way as it slows you down a great deal! Same with alcohol, it causes the muscles to be weaker, to recover slower. Why would you knowingly hurt your body when you want it to be in the best shape possible? Take care of yourselves and you will see the difference between a good player and a great player. Someone who is great does the little things right all the time, not just some of the time.