Ryan Maynard Video Analysis

Hello, these are videos of my 16 year old son, he averages high 70’s to low 80’s in game, recently he was experimenting with throwing side arm and his pitching coach agreed that mixing both would be a good idea as he has the capability to throw both accurately and without messing up his deliveries.
Any advice would be appreciated.

Normal:




Side Arm:

Hi Than

I wouldn’t be so concerned about 3/4 arm slot or side arm. Whatever way he picks up a ball and throws it to you is his natural arm slot. I would be much more concerned with his mechanics. There are quite a few faults in the beginning of his delivery that I see. Improving pitching mechanics begins with recognizing common mechanical faults that not only reduce pitching velocity and control but can also lead to arm injury.
These are some of the key things I see early in his delivery:

  1. Starting foot position on the mound
  2. Lack of weight shift
  3. Hand break and arm action on leg lift
  4. Back leg position before hand break
  5. Glove side arm action

I would not suggest mixing arm angles to any of my pitchers. I am a firm believer in proper mechanics first.

Steve C

Hi, thanks for your input.
I was wondering if you could clarify a couple things for us please.
What do you mean by lack of weight shift,
Hand break and arm action relating to leg action,
And glove side break.
I wasn’t a pitcher in highschool so I’m not sure what much of this means.

I’ll try to help you out be taking a stab at adding some insights to Steve’s comments:

1. Starting foot position on the mound

I’ll guess Steve is referring to your boy starting on the far left side of the rubber. Some coaches want righties on the right and lefties on the left to create angle. Don’t know if this is what Steve would suggest. Personally, I look at the effect starting position coupled with stride direction have on posture through the delivery and then adjust starting position to minimize postural shifts.

2. Lack of weight shift

It looks like your boy doesn’t get his center of mass moving forward until well after the peak of front knee lift. That’s generally considered late. The preference is to start moving forward before peak of knee lift. And I believe Steve agrees with this.

3. Hand break and arm action on leg lift

A common teach is to have the hands move up and down in sync with the front knee lift and then separate. Your boy’s hands move down as the front knee lifts and then hesitate while the knee drops. Hesitations in a delivery are usually frowned upon although it seems to be a common tactic used by the Japanese pitchers.

4. Back leg position before hand break

I’m not sure what Steve might be referring to.

5. Glove side arm action

It’s hard to see glove side arm action from the rear but it kind of looks like your boy might be pulling his glove back. If that happens before ball release, it usually results in early shoulder rotation which can affect performance and health. Not sure if this is what Steve is referring to.

Hope this helps.

Thank You Roger,

Roger explained the analysis spot on. Sorry I couldn’t get back to you myself but I have been very busy.

Back leg position before hand break - The pitchers support leg knee should be in a bent position (sitting into your delivery) and should remain over the support foot by pushing down and back as weight shift occurs. The core will then move out ahead of the support leg knee. This insures the pitcher is moving sideways and does not rotate too early

Steve C