Running?


#1

I know running only works the slow twitch muscles and weakens you, but why do I keep hearing these guys in college saying that you have to run everyday? If there in college, and they say that you gotta run everyday, then why is everyone here saying its bad?


#2

“run” as you put it is vague… did they say to run 3 miles everyday, or to run 10 sets of sprints everyday?
Here’s the schedule I want to start doing
Day 1
4x 25m sprints
4x 50m sprints
4x 75m sprints
4x 100m sprints
2x 200m sprints

Day 2
agility ladder

Day 3
rest

Day 4
[insert day 1]

Day 5
[ insert day 2]

Day 6
3mile jog

Day 7
rest


#3

Can someone please sticky this? This question gets asked about once a week and hopefully this will put the subject to bed.

[quote]Skeletal muscle tissue is composed of two general types of muscle fibers - fast-twitch and slow-twitch. Fast-twitch muscle fibers are selectively recruited when heavy work is demanded of the muscles, and strength and power are needed. They contract quickly, providing short bursts of energy, and are therefore used for high-intensity, low-endurance activities, such as sprinting, weightlifting, shot-putting, and swinging a golf club. However, fast-twitch muscle fibers become exhausted quickly. Pain and cramps rapidly develop from the buildup of lactic acid, which is a byproduct of the metabolism of this kind of muscle fiber.

Slow -twitch muscle fibers produce a steady, low-intensity, repetitive contraction. They do not tire easily and are recruited when endurance is needed. Therefore, slow-twitch muscle fibers are used for low-intensity, high-endurance activities, such as long distance running.

The duration and intensity of your activity will influence the physiology of your muscle tissue and the development of your muscle fibers. Endurance athletes tend to develop a greater percentage of slow-twitch muscle fibers, while power athletes tend to develop a greater percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibers. One reason for this is that in power athletes, the fast-twitch muscle fibers increase in size to store more ATP and CP. ATP and CP are needed for explosive energy. Another reason is that power athletes need more muscle glycogen to fuel their muscles, while endurance athletes need both muscle glycogen and fatty acids.
[/quote]

[quote]The duration and intensity of your activity will influence the physiology of your muscle tissue and the development of your muscle fibers. Endurance athletes tend to develop a greater percentage of slow-twitch muscle fibers, while power athletes tend to develop a greater percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibers. One reason for this is that in power athletes, the fast-twitch muscle fibers increase in size to store more ATP and CP. ATP and CP are needed for explosive energy. Another reason is that power athletes need more muscle glycogen to fuel their muscles, while endurance athletes need both muscle glycogen and fatty acids.
[/quote]

So, the more you run distance, the more your body will change to run long distances work effectively and efficiently. This leads to a predomination of slow twitch muscle, which will discourage explosive movement. Baseball is not a marathon or constant motion activity. Baseball, and pitching most especially, is a game that uses bursts of activity followed by lulls of inactivity. There is really no constant in a baseball game.
If you look at throwing a pitch (this is one thing that Dr. Marshall’s videos could be useful for :wink: ) then you will see that it is a highly explosive motion. Why train your body to work for 30 minutes when a pitch takes 3 seconds? Wouldn’t it be more helpful to train your body to make an explosive movement many times, rather than to complete a constant movement over a long period?


#4

agree 110% … just wish i had played for you !!


#5

Long distance running makes you a better overall athlete. It is the most benificial to overweight, out of shape kids. Redardless of what anyone here says I think long distance running is a good thing for fat kids.

For people that are already good athletes, it becomes less clear. Maybe you’ll lose a mph or two off your fastball, but you will be slimmer, more healthy, tire less quickly, you’ll get sick less often and you will feel better.

I could really care less what anyone says here (or anywhere for that matter)–I am going to run long distances. I would much rather throw 74 and feel great than throw 76 and not feel as good.

Also–random question/comment
Last year for 4 months I took a weight lifting class in gym. I lifted for 45-60 min pretty much every day, but I hardly got any bigger or stronger. Last year at my sports physcial (before weight lifting) I weighed 138 lbs and this year I weighed 131 lbs (after weight lifting). I’ve grown an inch or two since them so I should weigh more, but I don’t.

Why is this–I eat healthy and excercise daily.


#6

That isn’t really a fair example Hoove. If someone is fat and out of shape, than any athletic action is going to make them better. It is a question of comparison. Running long distance versus sitting on the couch all day: which would make a better athlete? Running long distance, of course. But if you were to place the overweight kid into a program of sprints, olympic/ explosive weight lifting, and plyometrics, he would excel more in baseball than if he were to run long distances.

Athletes in general are healthier than non-athletes. Doesn’t matter if you are fast or slow twitch muscle in that regard. Tiring less quickly really doesn’t apply to baseball. Long distance trains your muscles to go for long periods of time with less than maximal effort. Baseball is played in short spurts of maximum effort. It is a different animal entirely.

You can do what you want. I’ve already said that numerous times. Do what makes you happy. Life is too short to dedicate every breath you take to getting better at baseball. If cross country makes you feel good, more power to you. However, the question was asked about slow twitch muscle and the effects it has. I wanted to post the information here so people could make their own decisions.

[quote]Also–random question/comment
Last year for 4 months I took a weight lifting class in gym. I lifted for 45-60 min pretty much every day, but I hardly got any bigger or stronger. Last year at my sports physcial (before weight lifting) I weighed 138 lbs and this year I weighed 131 lbs (after weight lifting). I’ve grown an inch or two since them so I should weigh more, but I don’t.

Why is this–I eat healthy and excercise daily.[/quote]
Well, what are your goals? Weight lifting is actually a smaller part of the puzzle than many realize. The saying “muscle is made in the kitchen” is very true. You can workout til you are blue in the face, but the body needs excess calories in order to build bigger muscle. Weight gain is based on caloric surplus or defecit. You need to find your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). That is the amount of calories you burn just by being alive. If you add to that the factor of your activity (which would be very high because of X-country). That number would be your daily calories used. So, if you take the amount of calories that you eat in one day, and then subtract the total burned, would have your caloric surplus or defecit.
I’ll use myself as an example. My BMR is 2063 based on height, weight, and age. From that I would add about 900 calories for daily activities like workouts or just walking, etc. So daily my body would burn around 2900 calories. I eat 2200 calories a day, so 2200-2900= -700. I have a 700 calorie a day defecit. If you take that for the whole week, that would be 4900 calories a week, which is roughly 1.5 pounds lost (3500 calories is roughly one pound).
So if you want to gain weight, you need a surplus. Aim for a certain amount to gain every week. Start with one pound a week and see if you can keep up with that. Keep track of your food and then eat more if need be. There are many “hard-gainers” like you that have really high metabolisms, so you might have to eat 4000 calories a day in order to gain.


#7

I know I’m a tad late on this one, but i’ve never before heard that running can make your fastball SLOWER. Tom Seaver (Mets Hall of Famer) once said that during his playing days he use to run, run, and run. And that now-a-days he doesnt see “kids” running anymore. I dont think running long distances is all you should do, but it HAS to be in your workout. But, everyone is different and everyone has an opinion, so I guess it’s up to the individual.