Runner on 3rd: Do you pitch from the full or stretch?

I will pitch from the wind up when I have a runner on 3rd. First because if the runner tries to get a huge lead a good catcher will see that and throw to third and catch the runner halfway between bases or just get a straight tag. The only time I will pitch from the stretch with only a runner on 3rd is when it is possible the other team will try a squeeze play and that is when you would go from the stretch with even a slide step if possible to give the runner less time to make it home.

any decent base runner wouldn’t get picked by the catcher.

[quote=“the_K_king#2”]first off, the difference in leads for the runner on 3rd is greatly increased when a pitcher throws from the wind-up. they get a bigger jump when the ball is hit to an infielder. that lead difference can often times end up as run.

also, if there is a pass ball that bigger lead will make it easier to score.[/quote]

Trust me, I understand the difference it the amount of lead a runner can get when the pitcher is in the stretch as opposed to the windup, and that it makes it easier to score. That wasn’t the issue I was questioning.

What I’m questioning is, how often does it make any difference in the outcome of the game, other than of course the score? Of course it goes without saying that runs should always be kept off the board whenever feasible. I know people THINK it always makes a huge difference, but in reality that’s simply not true.

There’s a balance point where an out is more important than a run scoring, and that point changes all the time. FI, if your team was winning 3-1 in the bottom of the last inning and there were runners on 1st and 3rd with no outs and a ground ball was hit to the SS, do you want him to look the runner back at 3rd, then get the out at 1st, or concede the run and try for the DP? If you were the coach and had a pitcher on the mound who had a proclivity to throw balls in the dirt from the stretch, would you want him in the windup if he didn’t’ have to be?

I’m not saying its WRONG to go to the stretch with a runners on 3rd. I’m saying there are times when it really doesn’t make all that much difference. :wink:

i’ll agree with that. the situation certainly dictates whether or not you should throw from the stretch or wind-up

We stole home this high school season on a pitcher who got lazy and was pitching out of the full windup with runners on second and third. We wouldnt have even attempted it if he was throwing from the stretch.

Do what you want, but at the next levels of the game (college and pro ball) when theres a runner on third, pitchers pitch from the stretch, regardless of the situation. Its understandable that some on this site who’ve only been exposed to high school ball don’t understand this.

Bingo! And if your coaches at lower levels didn’t make you go from the stretch with runners stacked up against 3B, then you won’t be ready to do it at the next level - if you get there. :wink:

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]We stole home this high school season on a pitcher who got lazy and was pitching out of the full windup with runners on second and third. We wouldnt have even attempted it if he was throwing from the stretch.

Do what you want, but at the next levels of the game (college and pro ball) when theres a runner on third, pitchers pitch from the stretch, regardless of the situation. Its understandable that some on this site who’ve only been exposed to high school ball don’t understand this.[/quote]

And last night I watched the slowest runner on the Cleveland Indians steal 2nd base without a throw because the pitcher, even though he was in the stretch, got “lazy”. Anything can happen when fielders get ‘lazy’.

This past season we had 2 attempted steals of home with the pitcher in the stretch, and both succeeded. We had 2 attempts from the windup, and neither succeeded. Against us there were 2 attempts and they were both from the windup. Neither succeeded. The things that have to come together to give a runner the idea he should steal home are many and varied, and the things that have to happen for him to succeed are also many and varied. But for sure, not every runner is going to steal home if the pitcher throws from the windup.

I feel it’s a pitchers preference. I dont think there is a problem with the windup as long as the pitcher doesn’t get lazy and not check him as you guys said. All it takes is a quick look to let the runner know you see him and that your not gonna let him get a massive lead.

Exactly MM21. As with everything else in life, having a strict 1 size fits all policy simply doesn’t make sense.

I ususally would pitch from the windup, if he is planning to steal home, if you pitch from the windup or strech wouldn’t have any effect on how fast you get back to home plate if the ball goes to the backstop.

Personally I’m a fan of the stretch. I’ve used the windup with a guy on third before but I’ve come to really dislike it.

I’d rather have the same advantage a lefty has to first base where I can keep him close with different looks, it doesn’t mean I’m going to throw over all the time but he’d better not get off too far or lean because he may get picked, and he knows if he gets picked at third he’s going to get a big ole’ butt chewing from his ball coach, teammates, fans and a good mocking from the opponents.

Pustulio, do you remember the fifth game of the 1996 World Series when Andy Pettitte was pitching? He was, as we all know, a past master of the pickoff move—to any base—and at one point he picked off a runner who got a little too far off third. If you study that sequence you’ll see just how he did it. It was a thing of beauty, a joy forever, and a royal pain in the gluteus maximus to the runner who got picked off. 8)

I wasn’t old enough to remember but yes I’ve seen the video, haha gotta love Andy Pettitte, when he started to get older and everyone knew who he was nobody would dare get much of a lead off of him, and they’d still get picked.