Runner on 3rd: Do you pitch from the full or stretch?

What do you do?

I always pitched from the full windup with a runner on third—especially with the bases loaded. The whole point is to prevent that guy from scoring, and when you’re staring him in the face he’s not going to even give it a thought—he’ll hold the bag for all it’s worth. And I would go for the strikeout, and I usually got it.

Always, always, always Stretch! Giving up too much of a lead down the line allows the potential for a passed ball to allow the runner to score and allows the runner to score on a ground ball where he would otherwise hold.

runner on 3rd can only progress down the line as far as your 3rd baseman if you in the windup, you can always step back and break you hands to keep that runner close, don’t have to throw the ball. So windup is just as effective as the stretch, depends on if you feel like you are a substantially better pitcher from the windup.

less than two outs, i’m stretching.
2 outs, i go windup.
with infield in i dont want the guy at 3rd to get a huge lead while in the windup, it’s almost pointless for them to be in imo

When I see a pitcher resort to the wind-up with runners stacked up against 3B it tells me he needs work pitching from the stretch. But if he doesn’t do it at gametime, when is he going to do it? As a coach, if I let said pitcher go to the wind-up, I’m doing him a disservice. Youth baseball is developmental - don’t sacrifice their development for a win. :twocents:

In my opinion you should never to from the windup when a runner is on third, even with bases loaded and two outs.
You are allowing a runner to get a much larger lead at third to the point where they can go on any ground ball regardless of where your infielders are playing.
And with two outs, don’t you want to give your infield an opportunity to make a force out at a base other than first? If you go from the windup, your eliminating any chance to do so.
Just my thoughts.

[quote=“spiffychango”]less than two outs, i’m stretching.
2 outs, i go windup.
with infield in i dont want the guy at 3rd to get a huge lead while in the windup, it’s almost pointless for them to be in imo[/quote]

exactly

The chances of a passed ball allowing a runner on 3rd to score as compared to a wild pitch is probably close to 50:1 or more. Its usually the pitcher’s lack of skill that throws a breaking pitch only 53’ or so, and not the catcher not being able to catch a pitch.

So, if as a pitcher you’re so bad as to have to concern yourself with that kind of failure, by all means stay in the stretch, but it won’t help all that much.

In the end, it isn’t whether the pitcher goes into the stretch or not, but rather where he’s most comfortable. If he normally throws from the stretch, he’d be stupid to go to the windup, and if he was more comfortable in the windup, he’d be stupid to throw from the stretch. The whole object is to execute the best pitch he can to get out the batter because he’s the only guy on the offense who can hurt anyone.

Bottom line, regardless of your opinion, just don’t let someone get to third and you wont have a problem! :slight_smile:

Honestly for me it depends on two things:

  1. How are my mechanics?-this is because some days I have trouble findin my follow through when I’m in the windup, or one day I’ll have amazing control/velocity from the stretch, or maybe my mechanics are great from the windup so I’ll want to stay away from the stretch if I can. Stick to my strengths you know?

  2. How is the mound?- like yesterday I pitched on a mound where the rubber was atleast 6-8 inches higher than the mound it was on. So I had a hard time getting from my set position on the mound to the point where I’m pushing off the mound. But in the stretch I was able to lay my food right in front of the rubber and really push off.

I pitch from the stretch. Although the stealing of home is very rare nowadays, it is still possible, but only if a pitcher is pitching from the full windup. once their left foot moves you can take off, cause they cant do anything from there but pitch. On the other hand from the stretch, if they take off on first movement, you can either go to the plate or pick to third. So they tend to stay closer to the base. Stay honest.
Correct me if I am wrong :slight_smile:

I always threw from the windup with a runner on 3rd, not because I wasn’t comfortable in the stretch rather because the additional time in the delivery gave me time to evaluate a possible squeeze situation…if the runner would get moving early, most likely the hitter would end up on his back.

[quote=“therbert11”]I pitch from the stretch. Although the stealing of home is very rare nowadays, it is still possible, but only if a pitcher is pitching from the full windup. once their left foot moves you can take off, cause they cant do anything from there but pitch. On the other hand from the stretch, if they take off on first movement, you can either go to the plate or pick to third. So they tend to stay closer to the base. Stay honest.
Correct me if I am wrong :)[/quote]

Yes, all kinds of things are POSSIBLE, but how many are likely? What I mean is, certainly not every base runner is a threat to steal. The base it takes the most defensive skill to stop from stealing is 2nd. The throw is longer, it requires at least 3 players to execute, there are 2 throws, a transfer, and 2 catches that must be made, and both throws have to be fairly accurate in order to facilitate maximum execution. IOW, there’s a lot of moving parts.

The things necessary to get a runner stealing 3rd are much the same, but because the throw is about 30% shorter, there is a little more room for error, although the longer lead for the runner has a great impact. But the stealing of home is very different indeed. 1 throw and 1 catch. And even from the windup, there isn’t a whole lot of time for the runner to get from point “A” to point “B”. However you are correct that it can and does happen.

But let’s look at who’s gonna try it. Assume there are 4 batters on the lineup who are threats to steal 2nd on a somewhat routine basis. How many of them would be threat to steal home? And on top of that, how many times would it even make sense to try? Would any coach or runner even think of stealing home if there were no outs or they were ahead or behind by say 4 runs or more? And doesn’t the batter make a difference?

My point is, for all but a very few situations, it really doesn’t make a lot of sense for a pitcher to get too concerned with the runner on 3rd. His best defense against that runner scoring is to make the highest quality pitches to the batter he can.

i pitch from stretch to keep the guy on third close to the bag

Why? Where’s he gonna go?

Seriously, why?

There are times when its important, but there are other times when it really isn’t, so why not go to whatever’s the most comfortable when its not important?

Gotta keep him close so that he can’t go so far in case of a bunt, or even a ball in play…gotta let your infield have a crack at him.

Exactly. Good call.

Is it your experience that a runner on 3rd getting a few steps extra makes much of a difference every time, or even more often than not, when a runner makes it to 3rd?

Is it your experience that a runner on 3rd getting a few steps extra makes much of a difference every time, or even more often than not, when a runner makes it to 3rd?[/quote]

first off, the difference in leads for the runner on 3rd is greatly increased when a pitcher throws from the wind-up. they get a bigger jump when the ball is hit to an infielder. that lead difference can often times end up as run.

also, if there is a pass ball that bigger lead will make it easier to score.