Rotator Cuff Pain


#1

Hi, I’m experiencing some pain on my back shoulder (throwing arm). I think it might be related to the rotator cuff…

I’m thinking of a MRI to see if it has any tears.

I’m keeping my throwing arm elbow above my back shoulder, when I’m on the High-Cocked position, could this be the cause of the pain?
What is worse? To have it higher than your shoulders or to have it lower?

Thanks.


#2

This is probably due to a problem with hos you decelerate your arm and/or a muscles imbalance.

It’s bad, but probably not related to this problem.

Both are problematic, but having the elbow above the shoulder is much worse.

The ideal is for the elbow to be at or just below the level of the shoulder.


#3

I think I didn’t express myself right.

It’s not a pain on the back of my shoulder. Actually it is in front of it. And the pain is radiated through all my pitching arm.


#4

You probably don’t need an MRI at this point, unless the problem has been cronic. A doc or certified athletic trainer may be able to provide some advide without you having to have the costly MRI. Try that route first. Then, of course, let them decide what the next step should be. Sometimes an aggressive strengthening program after some active rest nips front shoulder pain.


#5

Yeah, I might see a doctor and then do what is needed. Our season has just begun, and I have a game, which I’m gonna be the starter if I’m okay, this Sunday.
Right now I feel like I can’t pitch, but I’m gonna rest until Sunday and see if I can recover.

I’m just icing right now even though I don’t know if this actually helps it.


#6

Then the pain could very well be related to having your elbow above your shoulder at the high-cocked position.

It is much better to have the elbow at or slightly below the level of the shoulder at this point.


#7

Then the pain could very well be related to having your elbow above your shoulder at the high-cocked position.

It is much better to have the elbow at or slightly below the level of the shoulder at this point.[/quote]

Yeah, I was seeking for some photos of Major Leaguers and most of them have the elbow at shoulder’s level.

Do you have an explanation to why keeping the elbow higher than the shoulders’ level may cause an injury to the arm?

Also, is there any drills that I can do to help me keep the elbow at shoulders’ level on the high-cocked position?
Thanks.


#8

One possible explanation is something called “impingement syndrome.” The idea is that moving the elbows both above and behind the shoulders may cause them to become entrapped in the bony structures around the elbow. Also, starting to rotate the shoulders at the moment when the muscles are strteched so much may put added stress on them.

In terms of how to fix the problem, the simplest advice is to just not do it.

One thing to keep in mind that doing this may be secondary to an effort to always keep the fingers on top of the ball (which I think is bad advice for this and other reasons). I find that it is much harder to do this if you face your plam toward 3B soon after breaking your hands out of your glove.