Rocked

I just pitched and I gave up 4 runs. I just got completely shellacked. Im hitting my spots but i just can’t get the umpire to call it. So then i feel like i have to “lob” it in the just too get a strike call. I think im not throwing fast enough im 5ft4 90 pds and a freshman in highschool i pitch tops at 58. I want to get my speed up to 65 by March. I know long toss will help so im going to start doing that, but what muscles should I work on when i work out. Thanks in advance

I suggest that you get a copy of any one of the following: “Fit to Pitch”, “Fastball Fitness”, or “The Pitching Edge”, all written by Tom House.

There are undoubtedly other books by other authors which may provide weight training advice specifically for pitchers but House’s stuff is explained well, and has good pictures to show you what he’s talking about.

Whatever book you get, keep it with you and start developing a regular pitching-specific workout for yourself in the weight room at your HS. Suggest that you figure out a time when you can do this very regularly–hit-or-miss workout schedules have a way of turning into “mostly miss” schedules and will probably not do you very much good over the long run.

I used to get rocked too from time to time. It’s part of the game. You can be upset … but then you must let it go and use the performance as motivation to work harder and prove yourself the next time you get an opportunity to pitch.

Keep working hard!

We have a pitching coach who still plays pro ball today and just last night he was telling us that exercises with arm bands really help before you go out and throw.

Steve—this reminds me of something I read in Jim Brosnan’s fascinating book “Pennant Race”. One day Jay Hook started for Cincinnati, and the Pirates ate him alive, turning every pitch he threw into line-drive extra-base hits. They knocked him out of there in the fifth inning, and when he returned to the dugout he sat in a corner and bemoaned the absence of his fast ball—it had up and deserted him. Brosnan, who might have made a very good pitching coach if he had wanted to pursue that avenue, tried to tell him, “Look—no pitcher has all his best stuff every time out. THAT’S WHEN YOU LEARN THIS GAME. You have other pitches to throw; use them when the fast ball isn’t there.” But Brosnan, himself a very good relief pitcher whose best pitch was the slider, might as well have been talking to the wall. Hook just sat there and moaned, over and over and over, "Without my fast ball I can’t pitch."
He didn’t last much longer in the bigs after that.
You are so right. Every pitcher—at least, almost every pitcher—has a bad day every now and then. Do you know what the Yankee pitchers called it? “Taking one’s turn in the barrel”—they left the starting pitcher in there to take his lumps; often it was simply because they were short on moundsmen at the time and needed to catch up. So the guy got rocked, shellacked, whatever you want to call it. But, in the words of a science teacher I had in high school, when he would demonstrate an experiment and it fizzled out, “Oh well, it’ll work out better next time.” That pitcher can figure out what went wrong and correct the mistake so he doesn’t make it again. :slight_smile:

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Steve—this reminds me of something I read in Jim Brosnan’s fascinating book “Pennant Race”. One day Jay Hook started for Cincinnati, and the Pirates ate him alive, turning every pitch he threw into line-drive extra-base hits. They knocked him out of there in the fifth inning, and when he returned to the dugout he sat in a corner and bemoaned the absence of his fast ball—it had up and deserted him. Brosnan, who might have made a very good pitching coach if he had wanted to pursue that avenue, tried to tell him, “Look—no pitcher has all his best stuff every time out. THAT’S WHEN YOU LEARN THIS GAME. You have other pitches to throw; use them when the fast ball isn’t there.” But Brosnan, himself a very good relief pitcher whose best pitch was the slider, might as well have been talking to the wall. Hook just sat there and moaned, over and over and over, "Without my fast ball I can’t pitch."
He didn’t last much longer in the bigs after that.
You are so right. Every pitcher—at least, almost every pitcher—has a bad day every now and then. Do you know what the Yankee pitchers called it? “Taking one’s turn in the barrel”—they left the starting pitcher in there to take his lumps; often it was simply because they were short on moundsmen at the time and needed to catch up. So the guy got rocked, shellacked, whatever you want to call it. But, in the words of a science teacher I had in high school, when he would demonstrate an experiment and it fizzled out, “Oh well, it’ll work out better next time.” That pitcher can figure out what went wrong and correct the mistake so he doesn’t make it again. :)[/quote]

Real nice points!

Do pushups, pullups and chinups help alot?

Push ups, pull ups, and chin ups are all great exercises but you need to do more than just that. I think of the pitching motion as a link that transfers energy and you are only as strong as your weakest link. A good basic program for you would be Steven Ellis’s tuff cuff. It really explains it self and the program has a good mixture of exercises to help with every part of pitching. I would recomend you going witht that its only about $65 which is pretty cheap considering it covers, Plyometrics, Functional Strength training, Medicine ball training, stretching, Nutrition, Running, etc. Its a good buy if you have the money. And dont worry about getting rocked it happens to us all

and the thing is, when you have a bad day - you were right there with them at the first pitch. what happened. preparation or execution. usually one or the other and vice/versa.

Is there like a ratio to mph and height like if i grew a few inches how mu=any more mph should i be throwing

there’s not any certain number for that, more than likely at your age if you grow you’ll start throwing harder but thats not always the case.

Ok well i just posted a video of my mechanics so take a look