Right hander pitching from right side of rubber


#1

Our main starter pitches from the left edge of rubber. My assistant coach suggested right side for right hander because of better angle for the pitch. From right side hitter has to look more over his shoulder. The pitch gets inside faster. On left side has to go on angle to go inside. Maybe faster to outside??? What do you think.


#2

i really think as long as you are pitching straight down the hill it isn’t really going to make much of a difference. Now i’m sure that Zita will give you some great advice on crossfire and using both sides of the rubber then. I know that some pitchers use the different sides of the rubber to locate their pitches better but honestly they are just really tipping their pitches.


#3

Talking more about staying on one spot and what is the advantage.


#4

Jaxson—actually, it would be more advantageous for you to start in the middle of the rubber, so you can move to one side or the other depending on the batter you’re facing, whether there are runners on base…I have seen Jose Contreras do just that, and he gets excellent results with it. By being able to switch positions on the mound you add to the batters’ confusion, and that’s what you want, isn’t it? As for tipping your pitches, I don’t think you would do that just by being on one side of the rubber or the other—there are many other ways pitchers will do that. Tsk, tsk.
About the crossfire, which I used a lot when I was pitching—this is a beautiful and lethal move which works only with the sidearm delivery. I’m assuming you can throw sidearm, and so I will tell you about it. Say you’re righthanded. Okay. You go into your windup, whether it be full windup, the stretch or no windup at all—but instead of pitching directly to the plate, you take one step toward third base, whip around, and—using your entire body—fire that pitch in from that angle. This move will work with any pitch, and it drives the batters nuts because they think it’s coming at them from third base. (If you’re a southpaw you go by way of first base, of course.) I would often do this with my hard slider, and one of the amusing results was that a lot of batters would swing so hard that they would lose their balance and fall over on the tush with their arms and legs up in the air like some overturned bug! :slight_smile: 8) :baseballpitcher:


#5

Here’s my take on it:

The preference is for a RHP to stay on the right side of the rubber for exactly the reasons you stated - the advantage of the angles. However, many pitchers don’t feel comfortable on the right side. The biggest reason to switch is if the pitcher opens too much into landing and ends up landing across the midline. I have seen many pitchers do this from the right side of the rubber, including my son. Moved him to the left side and he stays on the midline, so he’s stayed there ever since. I think you will see a great deal of variety at the major league level: pitchers who step sideways during the wind-up tend to stay to the left so they step onto the dirt intead of onto the rubber.


#6

[quote=“structuredoc”]Here’s my take on it:

The preference is for a RHP to stay on the right side of the rubber for exactly the reasons you stated - the advantage of the angles. However, many pitchers don’t feel comfortable on the right side. The biggest reason to switch is if the pitcher opens too much into landing and ends up landing across the midline. I have seen many pitchers do this from the right side of the rubber, including my son. Moved him to the left side and he stays on the midline, so he’s stayed there ever since. I think you will see a great deal of variety at the major league level: pitchers who step sideways during the wind-up tend to stay to the left so they step onto the dirt intead of onto the rubber.[/quote]

I totally agree. In reality, everyone is very different. I pitched from the right side and didn’t move at all. But there are guys like Hershiser and Maddux who tended to move a bit based on the movement of their pitches.


#7

Pay attention to the affect of different starting positions on your posture. Late posture shifts may create more problems that any benefit from “angle” is worth.


#8

I’m a RHP and I throw from 3rd base side. I used to throw from teh middle, but I would miss with my curveball just off teh plate. Once I moved over, I caught the corner better. I also throw a slider, which from that spot, freezes righties well, and it goes back door to lefties well.

i am not a fan of moving side to side, as it can lead to worse control.

I used to be a two-seamer, so if your two-seam is your primary pitch, I would go middle, assuming it gets good tail. Since a two-seam is more of a groundball pitch, rather than a strikeout pitch, you can get a lot of weak grounders to your infield. If you stand in teh middle, start it down the middle and hav it run onto a righties hands. They wont clear the bat head, and then theyll hit it off the handle. Or start it off the plate and bring it back. For lefties, start it down the middle and tail it to the outside corner. They’ll swing for the fence, and be way out in front. When you get two strikes, start it outer half and tail it off the plate.

Starting from the side wont get them to chase, and I feel the angles will make you more likely to throw something that will move into the hitters wheelhouse