Requesting analysis for 10 year old


#1

I would appreciate it if you could give me an analysis of my 10 year olds mechanics in this practice video. Thanks in advance for any help.


#2

He is stepping forward instead of gliding forward


#3

Thanks for the input. I will work with him on these points.


#4

the first thing I would do is eliminate the severe side step toward first base, he then has to shift is weight toward 3rd to get back over the rubber, yet slow his body down to prevent overcompensating toward 3rd. Essentially, everything to that point is errors to correct errors and builds him no momentum.

Establishing good tempo is very important, but it should never come at the expense of robbing momentum or energy.

If he needs to go east and west before going north and south, keep the east and west distances as small as possible.

I coached a game just yesterday with an opposing 13 year old pitcher stepping so severely toward first base that his pivot foot swept completely away from the front of the rubber toward first base. After placing his pivot foot down (both feet now in contact with the ground on the first base side of the mound), he has trained his pivot foot to take a second small tap step to get it back in front of the rubber before leg lift. It was a real horror show. He walked two batters in a row, so the coach went to the mound. During the mound conference, I seized the opportunity to speak to the plate umpire in an attempt to prevent the kid some embarrassment by balking home a run I advised him to bring it up to the pitcher now because it’s an illegal delivery and if he used that delivery with a runner at 3rd, I would be expecting a balk and a run. The plate umpire said he hadn’t noticed the wind up but would look for it. He never spoke to the kid or the coach. The runners advanced to 2nd and 3rd on a wild pitch, so the kid went back to the illegal delivery wind-up. The base umpire, who did not hear my discussion, correctly called a balk on the very next pitch and plated a run for us.

The other coach and the parent of the kid went absolutely wild. They could have avoided the penalty if the ump had just warned the kid as I suggested, or if the coaches weren’t completely oblivious to the rules, or if they hadn’t allowed the kid to form such a bad habit.

He could have simply pitched from the stretch and avoided the whole thing.


#5

[quote=“CoachPaul”]the first thing I would do is eliminate the severe side step toward first base, he then has to shift is weight toward 3rd to get back over the rubber, yet slow his body down to prevent overcompensating toward 3rd. Essentially, everything to that point is errors to correct errors and builds him no momentum.

Establishing good tempo is very important, but it should never come at the expense of robbing momentum or energy.

If he needs to go east and west before going north and south, keep the east and west distances as small as possible.

I coached a game just yesterday with an opposing 13 year old pitcher stepping so severely toward first base that his pivot foot swept completely away from the front of the rubber toward first base. After placing his pivot foot down (both feet now in contact with the ground on the first base side of the mound), he has trained his pivot foot to take a second small tap step to get it back in front of the rubber before leg lift. It was a real horror show. He walked two batters in a row, so the coach went to the mound. During the mound conference, I seized the opportunity to speak to the plate umpire in an attempt to prevent the kid some embarrassment by balking home a run I advised him to bring it up to the pitcher now because it’s an illegal delivery and if he used that delivery with a runner at 3rd, I would be expecting a balk and a run. The plate umpire said he hadn’t noticed the wind up but would look for it. He never spoke to the kid or the coach. The runners advanced to 2nd and 3rd on a wild pitch, so the kid went back to the illegal delivery wind-up. The base umpire, who did not hear my discussion, correctly called a balk on the very next pitch and plated a run for us.

The other coach and the parent of the kid went absolutely wild. They could have avoided the penalty if the ump had just warned the kid as I suggested, or if the coaches weren’t completely oblivious to the rules, or if they hadn’t allowed the kid to form such a bad habit.

He could have simply pitched from the stretch and avoided the whole thing.[/quote]
Thank you for your help. I will have him work on it and get you another video.


#6

To start off I want to say your son seems to have a good athletic ability and with that ability I think getting him in a generic windup position would help him out a lot.
Have him practice by starting his windup while facing the plate (squared). You don’t need to have a huge step back or to the side for tempo and rhythm to be initiated. A smaller step to the side will benefit him greatly in keeping himself balanced enough to repeat his delivery. As he gets used to this you can increase the size of the step if you think it is to small.
I noticed that his glove is started at head level and slightly off center. It might help to get him to at least chest high and centered in the middle of his chest. When your glove is off center it tends to keep you off balance. Also I might add that he seems to be really stiff in that position above his head. In my opinion you want to be in a more relaxed position (chest high).
Once he initiates hand break and stride he immediately starts to torso rotation which can hinder his result and potentially could lead to issues with his arm. I noticed that he is swinging his leg dominated by his stride leg knee. In my opinion he needs to get down the mound with his hips and shoulder closed.
If you notice in the video his glove side is in a different location after all of his pitches. He tends to be front shoulder dominate and swings his front shoulder with his front leg together. His glove side should be firm but passive into his release. These inconsistencies will be troublesome moving forward. If you want drills and a practice plan to help By all means PM me it’s hard to describe in words and would be happy to help.

Sorry if my language was off in explaining things. I will work on explaining myself better in words. :smiley:


#7

[quote=“PitcherFIT19”]To start off I want to say your son seems to have a good athletic ability and with that ability I think getting him in a generic windup position would help him out a lot.
Have him practice by starting his windup while facing the plate (squared). You don’t need to have a huge step back or to the side for tempo and rhythm to be initiated. A smaller step to the side will benefit him greatly in keeping himself balanced enough to repeat his delivery. As he gets used to this you can increase the size of the step if you think it is to small.
I noticed that his glove is started at head level and slightly off center. It might help to get him to at least chest high and centered in the middle of his chest. When your glove is off center it tends to keep you off balance. Also I might add that he seems to be really stiff in that position above his head. In my opinion you want to be in a more relaxed position (chest high).
Once he initiates hand break and stride he immediately starts to torso rotation which can hinder his result and potentially could lead to issues with his arm. I noticed that he is swinging his leg dominated by his stride leg knee. In my opinion he needs to get down the mound with his hips and shoulder closed.
If you notice in the video his glove side is in a different location after all of his pitches. He tends to be front shoulder dominate and swings his front shoulder with his front leg together. His glove side should be firm but passive into his release. These inconsistencies will be troublesome moving forward. If you want drills and a practice plan to help By all means PM me it’s hard to describe in words and would be happy to help.

Sorry if my language was off in explaining things. I will work on explaining myself better in words. :D[/quote]

Thank you for the help. I will have him work on these areas.


#8

Awesome of you to be so proactive in helping him along. Keep it up!! My recommendations would be to pick a couple key things, work on them, then pick a couple more…think of it like turning an aircraft carrier around. I recently did the same with my son, so I know it takes a great deal of persistence and patience, but it is worth it. Everybody is dead right, negate that big side rocker step. That is ideally taken back, or at a slight angle, and should be a step of no more than 3-4 inches. Quite simply, you want his momentum linear, straight toward the plate. Second, look up “Herschieser drill” which is basically teaching him to point that lead butt cheek at the plate and that should be leading your body down the hill initially. Third, he needs to stay “closed” coming down the hill and a good little practice tip is to have him set up in a stretch position and as he kicks his front leg up, have him try to pull that front knee back with his throwing hand as he starts down the hill then release it. He can also get this feel by pointing the toe on that kick leg back toward the shortstop as he comes down rather than it swinging past 3b then to home so quickly. Note, the lower leg should be dangling straight down from the knee on that kick leg when doing so, at least at this age. Lastly, and of critical importance, have him keep that glove elbow pointed just to the right of home plate, shoulder high ideally, and make sure that does not swing out or collapse early. You want him driving his chest through that to the glove. And when it comes to rotation, tell your boy to think “ferris wheel” and not “merry go round” when it comes to their unwind. You want him rotating over the top as much as possible at this age and not laterally. You can even practice this on one knee, his throwing side knee down, with the other foot forward. Have him separate with that front elbow up, note, he can bend his front elbow up to about 90 degrees, but have his palm facing away, then rotate shoulders as he drives his chest forward and release with good follow through that should graze the grass on his left side as he does. Search “one knee pitching drill” on you tube if you need visual help. Feel free if you have any additional questions, I am glad to help if I can.

MC


#9

[quote=“mcole”]Awesome of you to be so proactive in helping him along. Keep it up!! My recommendations would be to pick a couple key things, work on them, then pick a couple more…think of it like turning an aircraft carrier around. I recently did the same with my son, so I know it takes a great deal of persistence and patience, but it is worth it. Everybody is dead right, negate that big side rocker step. That is ideally taken back, or at a slight angle, and should be a step of no more than 3-4 inches. Quite simply, you want his momentum linear, straight toward the plate. Second, look up “Herschieser drill” which is basically teaching him to point that lead butt cheek at the plate and that should be leading your body down the hill initially. Third, he needs to stay “closed” coming down the hill and a good little practice tip is to have him set up in a stretch position and as he kicks his front leg up, have him try to pull that front knee back with his throwing hand as he starts down the hill then release it. He can also get this feel by pointing the toe on that kick leg back toward the shortstop as he comes down rather than it swinging past 3b then to home so quickly. Note, the lower leg should be dangling straight down from the knee on that kick leg when doing so, at least at this age. Lastly, and of critical importance, have him keep that glove elbow pointed just to the right of home plate, shoulder high ideally, and make sure that does not swing out or collapse early. You want him driving his chest through that to the glove. And when it comes to rotation, tell your boy to think “ferris wheel” and not “merry go round” when it comes to their unwind. You want him rotating over the top as much as possible at this age and not laterally. You can even practice this on one knee, his throwing side knee down, with the other foot forward. Have him separate with that front elbow up, note, he can bend his front elbow up to about 90 degrees, but have his palm facing away, then rotate shoulders as he drives his chest forward and release with good follow through that should graze the grass on his left side as he does. Search “one knee pitching drill” on you tube if you need visual help. Feel free if you have any additional questions, I am glad to help if I can.

MC[/quote]

Thank you for the tips. I am taking your advice and working on one or two things at a time with him. Once he gets a chance to work on some of these skills, I will post another video for review. Thanks again!


#10

Glad to help, and I don’t know if you use them already, but there are several free slow motion video analysis apps for your phone that are worth their weight in gold. I use one that is free and it has absolutely been critical to my son’s success. You can break the video down to about 1/100 of a second. I don’t know if this site does or does not allow product plugs of that nature, but google search the topic and you will find the options. Most are free or pretty close to free. Good luck!

MC