Regaining / maximizing velocity


#1

Guys… I wanted to throw this out there to all of you. While I’m sure there will be varying opinions, I’m curious to see what similarities there are in your TOP 5 velocity building exercises. I know there is more to pitching than just pure velocity, but I want to identify the/your TOP 5 velocity building exercises. Please, list for me/the readers in your order 5 exercises / best practices to absolutely maximizing what velocity we can get from our bodies. thank you in advance for your time and input

MT


#2

no one willing to throw a few ideas out there?? wow!


#3

Too vague! :slight_smile:


#4

Here’s 6: Throwing. Med ball work. Plyos training. Scap work. Rotator Cuff work. Sprint work.

But it is too vague…


#5

hang cleans


#6

Let me ask you something. How fast are you throwing right now? Did at any time you find youself losing some velocity? Are there, perhaps, some mechanical problems that are holding you back? Think carefully about these things, and let me know what you come up with. The important thing is you need to be specific about the issues you may be contending with. So let’s have it. 8)


#7

Any exercise that will tone your core and your trunk! Cardio is big too to make sure once you are where you want to be, you can maintain.


#8

Buwhite is on the right track. Now let me take it further and tell you about—THE SECRET.
I learned it many moons ago, when I was seriously getting into pitching. I used to go to the original Yankee Stadium every chance I got, and I would watch the Yankees’ fabled Big Three pitching rotation—Vic Raschi, Allie Reynolds and Ed Lopat—in practice and in games. What I noticed was that they were all doing the same thing: they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were generating the power behind their pitches—even Lopat who was not a fireballer. In doing this they took a lot of pressure off the arm and the shoulder so they could throw harder (and faster) with less effort: and not a sore arm or a sore shoulder or a sore elbow or a sore anything else in the bunch!
Watching this, I realized that this was the real key to a pitcher’s power, and I made a note of what they were doing and how they were doing it and started working on it on my own. As I practiced this essential element of good mechanics—and believe me, it is essential—I found myself doing the same things they were doing, and even though I didn’t have the speed I was throwing harder with less effort. Because I was destined to be a snake-jazzer—a finesse pitcher with not much in the way of speed—I decided to take full advantage of what I could do, and I set about acquiring several good breaking pitches and learned to change speeds on them. A knuckle curve—a palm ball—and, a bit later on, I learned the slider, and it became my strikeout pitch. And I had a terrific pitching coach—one of the Big Three, Ed Lopat, who saw where I was coming from and took me in hand and helped me become an even better pitcher than I had been.
One of the best things you can do is work on getting your whole body into the action this way. There are several good drills and exercises you can do, and one of the best is called the “Hershiser” drill, which aims at getting the hips fully involved, because this is one of the keys to that power I spoke of. And maybe I couldn’t do it, but you certainly can—regain that velocity, even build on it. And it will take a lot of pressure off your arm and shoulder—and that’s a nice feeling, not to have to worry about sore arms and sore elbows and things like that. :slight_smile: 8) :baseballpitcher:


#9

that’s a great question, one that unfortunately as I type this reply I have no answer to. I haven’t been clocked since March of 2009 while I was preparing for the MSBL Kickoff Classic in Las Vegas. At that time I was consistently in the upper 70’s and touching 80 and 81. I know physically I’m in better shape today, but I just started my 90 day throwing program 15 days ago. I am bigger, stronger, leaner, faster (as in running MPH) than ever, and focusing on diet and rest as well. I feel like my flexibility thru my trunk and hips is a potential velocity stealer. I do a great deal of stretching, as well as vinassa yoga now too. I desperately want to find out what this body can do, and am willing to work as hard as it takes to find out!


#10

One thing comes to mind that you didn’t mention: how old are you? This could be very important, because if you’re still in your teens there is a possibility that you may be going through another growth spurt and may not have reached your full height. This could account for what you see as a loss of velocity—if such is the case, don’t worry about it, just ride it out and do the best you can. Once the physical element has stabilized you can go ahead with whatever you need to do.
But if you’re beyond the teen years—say in your twenties—my advice would be to find yourself a really good pitching coach, one who knows his elbow from third base, and have him work intensively with you to pinpoint the areas that need work. This is just a suggestion, but it could be a very good one to think about. Whatever you do—don’t give up the ship, as the saying goes. It’s never too late to get this kind of advice, assistance and instruction from someone who knows the score. :slight_smile:


#11

[quote=“Zita Carno”]One thing comes to mind that you didn’t mention: how old are you? This could be very important, because if you’re still in your teens there is a possibility that you may be going through another growth spurt and may not have reached your full height. This could account for what you see as a loss of velocity—if such is the case, don’t worry about it, just ride it out and do the best you can. Once the physical element has stabilized you can go ahead with whatever you need to do.
But if you’re beyond the teen years—say in your twenties—my advice would be to find yourself a really good pitching coach, one who knows his elbow from third base, and have him work intensively with you to pinpoint the areas that need work. This is just a suggestion, but it could be a very good one to think about. Whatever you do—don’t give up the ship, as the saying goes. It’s never too late to get this kind of advice, assistance and instruction from someone who knows the score. :)[/quote]

ZC, I have a feeling you’re gonna be surprised by the answer to this one. In July I’ll be turning 38. I’m currently pitching in a wood-bat only league that’s 21+. In early January I hired a strength/conditioning coach as well as a speed/agility coach. I’ll be working with a former Tidewater Tide in early March to help me refine my mechanics. I’m reading and training and eating and doing everything I can think of to ensure that I’ll get the most in the way of on-field performance from this body of mine. As for physical attributes, I’m just shy of 6’2 and weighed in this AM @ 203lbs.


#12

ecmike73: where are you located? Just curious - you said you were working with a former Tidewater Tide - are you in Virginia?


#13

I live in southern Westchester County, just outside NYC. I’ve known Reggie Jackson (Al Jackson’s son) almost 20 years, but lost touch up until about 2 years ago. He pitched on the '84 Jackson Mets (AA Affiliate). They were the Texas League Champs that year (83-53). I apparently misspoke when I said Tidewater Tides, sorry. He was 2-4 with a WHIP of 1.28, his BB/9 = 3.13 and his K/9 = 10.70 that year.


#14

I met Reggie a year ago actually. He was in downtown Denver, I ran into him, and we talked for 30 minutes. That made my week! Great guy to say the least about him.


#15

To ecmike73—I would have been very surprised if you had told me you were 65-plus. But you’re not. And I’m happy to see that you’re working with a coach and a trainer on the issues you presented; just keep at it and your problems will be resolved and you’ll be getting back into the game in short order. Kudos to you, and stay with it. :slight_smile: