Redshirting


#1

Does anyone have comments on the pros and cons of redshirting in your freshman year at a DI school.


#2

Depends on where you’re going to school and how big the program is. For some pitchers, it’s a super idea. For others, maybe not. Generally, my advice it this: If you were getting serious looks by pro scouts in high school, don’t red shirt. If, however, you didn’t get any looks in high school by pro scouts, then red shirting is a good idea. It will enable you more time to develop your skills, size, velocity, etc.


#3

what is redshirting?


#4

Redshirting means you will sit out a whole year from playing in competition but you will still have 4 years to play. For example. If you go to college and your first year you tear your acl and are forced to sit out the whole year, you can get redshirted which means the next year you will still be a freshman, a redshirt freshman. Its a way for you to get all four years of playing a sport even with an injury and any other reason you may sit out a year. In certain programs however you may go there and see there are 10 senior pitchers on the team and you have no chance to get any playing time and they will redshirt you so the next year you will still be a freshman but with a chance to pitch a fair amount of innings.

You see this in football alot, someone who maybe needs to gain 20 pounds for their position will be redshirted until they are physically ready. I was redshirted for a year after I had surgery on my elbow my soph year in college and because of the redshirt it was like the year never existed because I came back form surgery still a Sophomore.


#5

That brings up a question for me. How old can you be to compete in the NCAA? And are there any other requirements involved. I’m 23 and was thinking about joining the University of Hawaii at Hilo’s program in a year. I guess you can say that I’ve been redshirting for the last 5 years. I believe they are a Division I school. Am I too old to join?


#6

How long have you been in school? The NCAA has a rule now where once you step foot on campus you have 5 years to play 4 years of a sport. Thats the normal 4 plus an extra year in case of injury…ala redshirting.

Thats the main rule I know off just go to the NCAA website and they have numbers for you to call. I would either do that or go to the University’s Athletic Dept and ask to speak to someone in the Compliance Office. That is who handles all the NCAA rules and regulations.


#7

That’s no good. I’ve been going to college off and on for the last 5 years. I was hoping to join a team next year, if I decided to go full time. I guess I should start looking for a 18+ league then. I really don’t mind though, as long as I get to play some ball.


#8

Jay,
You might want to check the rules. I’m not sure that going part time starts the clock. I am fairly certain that even starting one semester as a full time student starts the clock. There is also the option of playing at an NAIA school where the NCAA rules don’t apply.


#9

Definately look further into it. Don’t let “somebody said” rule your future. Most of the college coaches I have met are very open to being approached by a perspective player.