Rate my son's performance

My son is 11 and recently broke his right foot and ankle. This was his 2 time on the mound since the injury. He is a right handed pitcher. He started the game and went 4 2/3, 69 total pitches, 50 for strikes. He struck out the first 5 of the game and 9 in all. He only walked 1. He doesn’t have dominating stuff speed wise, and he only throws a fastball and changeup. I’d say his fastball is 50-52 mph. Just wanted to hear what you guys thought. Thanks.

72% Strike:Ball ratio is incredible for any age. Pitch count of 15 pitches/inning is also very good for this age group. Keep throwing strikes like that and he’ll be very successful. Keep us informed how he does.

Thanks man. I appreciate it. We are playing again this weekend. I’ll let you know. I put some video of him on here about 6 month ago. Probably hard to find now though.

Those numbers are great and I think you know that, the only thing that will change with better competition is better and more patient hitters and how does he get those batters out then. I would like to see more ground ball outs, strike outs don’t do it necessarily for me…how many pitchers do you know with 3 pitch to 6 pitch innings, how about more ground ball outs than strike outs, those are the pitchers that will have a big future. Ground balls seriously keeps down pitch numbers.

I am not nocking your sons performance but I want the defense working and making plays and get the strike outs when the situation needs them.

I do really like the fact that he is doing that with only a FB and CU, he will have time to add pitches later on.

Good Luck to him!!!

I don’t take it as a knock. I appreciate the advice. I would prefer that as well. However, defense is not a strength of his current team. So is the life in kid baseball.

Since his is throwing alot of strikes, what are some thing we can do during the week to strengthen his arm to gain some velocity, if any? Thanks for all the advice.

You know, I didn’t put much up at the time because for a kid your sons age, you don’t just want to throw everything in the world at him and you too. I think the best development of pitchers has been ones who take some peice of advice and try to incorporate it into their pitching. Then put up another video. My son it 14 and he has put videos up since he was 10 trying to make little adjustments both from here and his pitching coaches. I would get another video up of him and consider some of the things that might come your way from that.

I looked up your sons old video and he looked good for his age, slide step only? Like to see some winup! Next I didn’t like how far infront he started his left foot to the other, his left shoulder closed a little giving a bit of twist to the motion. I would also try and get his feet a little closer together he needs to rock his weight to the post vs just coming straight up (commits him to only go home too much). Finally a little work on the glove side to pull the ball to the plate would be good. Not everything at once, work on one thing for a week, then something else for a week then let it sink in for a week then do another video session.

Gain velocity! long toss, how about pitch from 54 feet vs the 50 feet that I think you were throwing from in the video. Or maybe the throwers 10 program or tuffcuff? I don’t know how intese your son is?

Like Buwhite said, a little at a time. I have worked with my 9 yo (soon 10) heavily on mechanics to increase his speed. But every mechanical change for velocity seems to have a possible negative as well. Trying to increase his speed too quickly can result in poor balance or timing with loss of accuracy. Add one thing at a time. A lot to be said for a kid that throws strikes. Be proud.

Thanks for all the helpful tips. I printed out the slides for the Thrower’s Ten Exercise Program. How many lbs should the dumbell weigh. I was thinking 2.5 of 5lbs. What do ya think? My son is 5’0" tall and weighs about 110 lbs. Thanks.

My son uses a resistant band and a 3# three times a week. Also, include stretching exercises & squats when he’s watching TV, and some core exercises such as sit ups and push ups. He can watch TV when he’s doing his resistant band, so he doesn’t feel like he’s missing out. My son is 11, 5’6" 140 Lbs.

stat line is great… at that age its tuff to get a read on hits and earned runs since base stealing is a free for all & the defense can be questionable at best.

I look at K/W ratio… 9/1 is spectacular. He;s throwing strikes & making guys miss. Good mechanics, arm care, throwing strikes & learning to compete while enjoying the game is all an 11 yr old needs to worry about.

I like a lot of the arm care ideas… especially bands. My son has zero arm issues since he incorporated bands (age 11). Kids dont usually take to working out until 13, bands do a great job & seem less taxing.

If dumbbells are needed or desired stay with 3 lbs or less & higher reps (exception being curls). I was introduced to rotator cuff exercises at 16 by a future HOF pitcher who advised the same 3 lb max with higher reps for shoulder exercises for pitchers… those where his personal limits as well as advice to me.

50-52 is good at his age/size… unless its well below avg (no issue with your son) velocity isnt the focus at this age. Good mechanics & basic arm care & a good throwing routine will develop that along with maturity. As he gets older you can incorporate things to maximize the velocity.

As long as he’s active (riding bike, running, other sports etc) his core & lower body will develop strength to support him & velocity.

take it up a notch each year (medicine balls, light weights etc…) just dont push it or take the fun away. Hopefully you can stay at or ahead of the curve & he’ll be the kid who enjoys working out and dedicated.

So far it sounds like he’s on a great track & has a Dad doing the right things & seeking the right plans.

Good luck & keep everyone posted… buwhite is a great example… there is so much to learn from each other & so much to pass along to those starting the process a few years behind others.

I am so pumped from everything I’ve read on here! Thanks guys. We have one of those rawlings 5 tool bands with the baseball on then end. Is that okay or can you reccomend something better? Thanks.

Hey guys. My son pitched again this weekend. He did not pitch on Saturday. He started the championship game on Sunday. He did well again. I don’t have all the numbers, but I know he went 4 innings, faced 19 batters, struck out 3 and only walked 1. He gave up 2 unearned runs as our defense made 4 errors behind him. He only gave up 2 hits. His coach thought he was off because it didn’t look like he was throwing as hard as he has in the past. I kinda thought that too. It was a tense game as we went 8 full innings and won 4-3 to win the tournament. He also hit his first homerun (a Grand Slam!) on Saturday. All in all we had a great weekend. Anything I can do to help him with his velocity please let me know. Thanks.

Get more video up, things aren’t just done they take lots of time and constant adjustments to get him to where he wants to be. Velocity is one of those things that you just can’t rate by eye, pitcher looks like he isn’t thowing hard but the speed is actually more…but then sometimes it’s less…others the same. Looks like his overall is very solid though.

Way to many strikes. I have an 11 yr old pitcher very capable of throwing lots of strikes. throws in the 58 mph range ( we play up a year and where we play if he puts one down the middle it gets hit and hit hard) . Strikes get hit, especially in the very competitve travel ball leagues and tourneys. Where most kids have hitting instructors and are very disciplined hitters.Good hitters want to hit their pitch, and good pitchers want hitters to hit the pitchers pitch. You get good hitters out with balls off the plate or in on their hands. 1st thing I would do is get him some Quality pitching instruction, one that teaches proper mechanics, balance, and the theory and mindset of pitching. 2nd get him some good hitting instruction so he knows the mindset of a quality hitter ( sometimes I think my son has learned as much about his pitching from his hitting lessons as he has from his pitching lessons. 3rd have his instrucor teach him a 2 seam fastball, my sons throws his 4 inches outside and it hooks back in 4-6 inches and catches the outside corner on a righty (the batter thinks it going to be a ball) or we throw it down the middle and it comes back in on his hands and we get week ground balls or popups (it is a beautiful pitch it has turned into his out pitch) and there is virtually no more stress then his 4 seam fastball and my son picked it up unbelievable fast… he also has a curve we only throw it the 2nd time threw the lineup and very little ( if he uses it to much I will take him out of the game myself and the coach is very aware of it), he throws it with very little stress on his arm in my opinion, the bottom doesnt have to fall out of it like Strausburgs. He only has to move it 6 to 8 inches left or 6 to 8 inches down and control it.same way with it you can start it out on the hands and throw it for a strike or start it center of the plate and throw it to be wiffed at as it goes off the plate. to be affective at that age it doesnt have to move a bunch. good luck and have a winning season

Well your information to us really isn’t enough to say, “Way too many Strikes”, I wouldn’t mind 100% strikes if the batters are swinging, fouling pitches off and wiffing through. You can be at 100% and only work the corners and the top and bottom of the zone. Now reasonably, the older you get the more pitches you will need to throw and the more balls you will have waste to set the batters up the way you want to, so your strike % will drop over time. I think that is what he was trying to say.

Strikes down the middle of the plate get hit. That’s batting practice pitching. But it’s good advice to throw the two-seamer where you get some movement and keep the ball away from the middle. A strike that tails in or away from a hitter is tough to hit in youth leagues.

I was just basing my opinion on what i have seen from my sons pitching. when he was 9 and pitched in the local “rec” league he pitched a whole season say maybe 30 innings, he never gave a hit up all year he threw strikes and blew it by them. Once he was asked to play travel ball the following year something weird happened he was still throwing strikes but he was getting hit and hit fairly hard luckily he keeps the ball low and most of them were grounders and we have a really good infield so most of them were outs. I asked the coach what he thought was wrong and that was his reply “way to many strikes”.good hitters are going to hit balls on either corner, outside they just hit them deeper on the plate and inside they just hit them out in front of the plate and still get the sweet spot on them. If your crowding the plate were going to try to throw you 3 inches inside for a ball.we started throwing balls and we started to get a few more strike outs. we also started getting balls hit not as hard, inside balls guys were rolling over on and not hitting as sharply. outside balls were getting hit off the end of the bat. most hitters aree taught when the are ahead in the count the plate shrinks 2 inches on the corners. when they are behind in the count it widens 2 inches. those are the balls i was talking about throwing. If the pitcher is ahead in the count 0-2 why would he throw another strike? the hitter is has to protect the plate he cant let one 2 inches outside go by and take a chance of the umpire ringing him up. baseball is about getting outs not strikes

TOO MANY STRIKES???
Oy vey! The poor umpire, who pribably has to contend with a bad case of “umpire’s elbow” or “umpire’s shoulder” or “umpire’s laryngitis” from having to yell “strike” all the time—I have no sympathy for him. I love strikes. I used to throw them all the time. Ed Lopat told me I was a strikeout pitcher. Oh, I would get some groundball outs—I had a good infield behind me—but mostly I threw strikes, and never in the same place or with the same pitch or at the same speed, and the batters used to scream blue murder, not to mention a host of other felonies real and imagined.
TOO MANY STRIKES??? Lopat almost never threw them. He would throw pitches that looked like strikes—close enough to the zone that the ump would call them strikes. This was an interesting aspect of the strategic pitching he would tell me about. And nowadays we see relief pitchers, particularly closers like the great Mariano Rivera, who will come into the game and strike out the side, good morning, good afternoon and good night, and take a shower and go home.
One time I told Lopat that the opposing batters hit so few fly balls to the outfield that my outfielders would just be standing around doing nothing, and I suggested that we put out a barbecue grill in center field and let them grill some steaks and chops to pass the time! We had a good laugh about that.
TOO MANY STRIKES??? Not on your life. There are many ways, many pitches, with which one can get strikeouts—the curve, the slider, the knuckle-curve, the slip pitch, the circle change, even a fast ball if you have one—and in my day the strike zone was a lot bigger than it is now, so I had plenty of room to throw them. And one of the greatest pleasures of the game is to watch a befuddled batter stand there and go “duh”—or swing and miss and lose his balance and fall over on his tush with his arms and legs up in the air like some overturned bug—as once again the umpire yells "Strike three!"
I love strikes. :smiley: 8) :baseballpitcher:

[quote=“Zita Carno”]TOO MANY STRIKES???
Oy vey! The poor umpire, who pribably has to contend with a bad case of “umpire’s elbow” or “umpire’s shoulder” or “umpire’s laryngitis” from having to yell “strike” all the time—I have no sympathy for him. I love strikes. I used to throw them all the time. Ed Lopat told me I was a strikeout pitcher. Oh, I would get some groundball outs—I had a good infield behind me—but mostly I threw strikes, and never in the same place or with the same pitch or at the same speed, and the batters used to scream blue murder, not to mention a host of other felonies real and imagined.
TOO MANY STRIKES??? Lopat almost never threw them. He would throw pitches that looked like strikes—close enough to the zone that the ump would call them strikes. This was an interesting aspect of the strategic pitching he would tell me about. And nowadays we see relief pitchers, particularly closers like the great Mariano Rivera, who will come into the game and strike out the side, good morning, good afternoon and good night, and take a shower and go home.
One time I told Lopat that the opposing batters hit so few fly balls to the outfield that my outfielders would just be standing around doing nothing, and I suggested that we put out a barbecue grill in center field and let them grill some steaks and chops to pass the time! We had a good laugh about that.
TOO MANY STRIKES??? Not on your life. There are many ways, many pitches, with which one can get strikeouts—the curve, the slider, the knuckle-curve, the slip pitch, the circle change, even a fast ball if you have one—and in my day the strike zone was a lot bigger than it is now, so I had plenty of room to throw them. And one of the greatest pleasures of the game is to watch a befuddled batter stand there and go “duh”—or swing and miss and lose his balance and fall over on his tush with his arms and legs up in the air like some overturned bug—as once again the umpire yells "Strike three!"
I love strikes. :smiley: 8) :baseballpitcher:[/quote]

we were talking about a 12 yr old with a 52 mph fastball. not mariano who has mid mid 90’s cut fastball that moves a bunch, at 12 yrs old a 52 mph pitch any where on the plate should be getting jacked by a decent hitter. i was just sayng that if you are ahead in the count it doesnt hurt to throw some off the plate and try to get the hitter to swing at a bad pitch