Randy Johnson and Pitchers Back leg

When randy johnson pitches and strides his back leg is straight not bent like other pitchers I do this when I gain my best momentum. Now can anyone see and thing wrong with it?

My view is the leg can NOT bend really since if you gain that much momentum your body has to stay tall and keep the body balanced. Ever since I have been able in the last couple of day’s to get the same amount or close to the same I just keep it straight because I don’t want to fall.

http://www.pitchingclips.com/players/randy_johnson.htm

1st clip

If anyone has any other better clips please post them in this thread so that we can have a better look

I think Momentum is more important to think about then stride length. [/youtube]

RYAN POPE
http://www.pitchingclips.com/players/ryan_pope.htm

Look at the momentum sideway’s before peek leg lift and then watch his post leg all the way through it does not bend like other pitchers do it stays mostly straight. I think this is a by product of good momentum before peak leg lift.

What do you think?

[quote=“RIstar”]

I think Momentum is more important to think about then stride length. [/youtube]

[/quote]I think that he has changed his mechanics over the years to ease the discomfort of a chronic bad back. He doesn’t throw nearly as hard these days as when I watched him pitch in Seattle or Arizona.

To answer your question, though, I think that momentum often goes hand in hand with stride length. Trying to separate the two leads to confusion. The stride length should be long enough to maximize the imparting of momentum to the delivery, but not so long that it causes the pitcher to have timing or balance issues. I don’t think that there is a perfect, universal number that can be applied to stride length. It is trial and error with a good coach that determines the proper length of stride for your delivery.

Hose

If you go to video Pitchingclips.com and randy johnson in arizona he has keep his leg ALLOWs straight like that throughout the years never has changed it so now why do you think that and do you think it’s ok?

Brandon Morrow bends his leg very little and gets better momentum then most pro’s that I see that bend there back leg alot.

I think true momentum before peak leg lift means you don’t bend the back leg as much as you would without alot of momentum.

What do you think?

Best drill for momentum is from the NPA and has worked great for me.

1st stand in stretch
2nd put the plant foot behind the post leg so they cross
3rd lift and throw just like you would normally

Things to remember it takes practice will feel weird on flat ground since your body will plant quicker then the mound. Might feel like rushing but as long as you lead with hip you are fine.

Rear leg bend is a topic of much discussion. Some coaches have disputed the fact that to achieve maximum straight-line momentum, pitchers do not push off the pitching rubber. Rather they pull their front hip toward the catcher. Examining the pictures above, it seems relatively clear that the pitcher’s rear leg indicates, due to flexion, that force will be applied toward second base trying to accelerate the body forward. If a pitcher moves toward the plate with an extended rear leg, it would seem they are not using all their available muscles to create force toward the plate.
From an article I have found

do you think the bold is true?

Randy Johsnon, brandon marrow, Ryan Pope and others don’t bend there back leg to much and get great MPH I think that bold section is a bunch of crock.

What do you think?

http://baseballideas.blogspot.com/2006_02_01_archive.html

1st part of article called Stage 3 bent leg

Let me ask you this RiStar.

What force is applied to allow your front hip to be pulled towards the catcher?

Gravity?

All I know from me doing it is that I lift and start to not fall but drift forward to the plate.

You tell me what kind of force idk?

Wow lol I knew that but it totally went over my head lol That is the whole point of moving out while lifting to let gravity move you better.

How do you move out while lifting?

I don’t want to get this whole push thing going again… But for me I use a nudge away from the rubber to get started.

I lift and drive out at the same time like Brandon Marrow almost now it works good. I like let the body fall almost just let the hip drfit hard to explain it just happens now. I get about 4-6 inches out now before peak leg lift most is like 12 but I felt like I was going to fall on my face.

When you mean nudge what do you mean?

Well I will refuse to call it a push just so I don’t infuriate anybody on this forum. When I begin to lift my leg my weight transfers to my back foot. Very soon after, well before my foot reaches the so called “balance point” I just give a little sideways nudge from the rubber… This will initiate my momentum and then I go from there. Some people start there momentum differently such as just allowing gravity to work, which I’m sure is fine. My point is, it doesn’t matter how you get your momentum started, as long as you do. Randy’s back leg is very slightly bent. It doesn’t need to be super flexed. He get’s his momentum going just fine and uses his height and long arms to his advantage.

How far out are you at peak leg lift into your stride to the plate?

I get pretty far just by letting gravity work

[quote=“RIstar”]How far out are you at peak leg lift into your stride to the plate?

I get pretty far just by letting gravity work[/quote]

that would be kind of difficult to measure

Johnson is 6’10" and real lanky. He doesn’t need to “drive and drop”. His long legs and arms create leverage to throw the ball. I don’t think Billy Wagner could “use” Johnson’s mechanics.

I’m not sure why you say Morrow doesn’t bend his knee. But he does.


Ryan Pope does, too. It just looks like he doesn’t because of the angle. His knee is pointing at the camera for most of the clip.

The “push” happens at the hip, not at the foot. But it’s not really a push. It’s just the back hip resisting the back leg.

All this has been covered in previous threads.

Wow nice video and picture. He bends it very quick and then it turns over. I do that somewhat too but it stays kind of straight at 1st then I drop a little and continue to drive but for about 6-12 inches out into stride and peak leg lift it is straight then a quick flex and then turns over and throw.

[quote=“RIstar”]Best drill for momentum is from the NPA and has worked great for me.

1st stand in stretch
2nd put the plant foot behind the post leg so they cross
3rd lift and throw just like you would normally[/quote]
If you’re trying to do the NPA’s Cross-over drill, then the plant foot should be crossed in front of - not behind - the post leg.

so the left leg is over the right leg for a right handed pitcher?

Plant leg is behind the post leg right?

“Plant” foot would be your left. The one that “plants” at landing. The “post” foot would be your right one.