Question


#1

My son is 11 wont be twelve till last of August.He pitches in Little league and he has made the school team this year.Some have asked about him pitching for them.I think it would mess him up pitching from 45’ and 60’.WHat do you think?


#2

Pitching from 60 feet might be harder, but it shouldn’t mess him up from pitching closer. It will also be good practice for when he gets older and has to throw from 60 feet.


#3

That’s a big differential.

Last year my guys pitched in two leagues: 40 and 47. They had a hard time transitioning between the two.


#4

You say that your son made the school team. I have a number of questions for you…
What exactly is the school he attends - elmentary or middle school - and what are the dimensions of the field the school team uses? Do the seasons run simultaneously or overlap? Is he a starter on his Little League team or is he more often used as a “spot” starter? Did he struggle with his control while throwing in Little League? When he wasn’t pitching, what position did he primarily play?


#5

[quote=“skwezeplay”]You say that your son made the school team. I have a number of questions for you…
What exactly is the school he attends - elmentary or middle school - and what are the dimensions of the field the school team uses? Do the seasons run simultaneously or overlap? Is he a starter on his Little League team or is he more often used as a “spot” starter? Did he struggle with his control while throwing in Little League? When he wasn’t pitching, what position did he primarily play?[/quote]He’s playing middle school ball.Exact dimensions of the field i don’t know.I think the pitching distance is around 60’.The seasons overlap with the school ball ending first.He was the starter on his little league team and their all-star team.Pitched one game a week for 6 innings most of the time and when it was needed 3 one game and three the next.He really has good control,throwed in the mid 50’s and hits his spots very well and works the batters really hard.When not pitching he’s behind the plate most of the time.I am worried about him throwing to many pitches.and don’t want to mess up his control.


#6

Having your son either pitch or catch may be a bad idea because it puts a lot of load on his arm. He has to throw the ball with every delivery.

I try to have my pitchers play 1B, 2B, or OF when not pitching. That way they don’t overexert their arms.


#7

sometimes you cant be that choosey where a kid plays. in the perfect world it would be great. last year we had a first team allstate pitcher but he was also player of the year in northeast tennesee not only for his pitching but also due to his shortstop play. this year our #3 pitcher - a sophomore is our starting catcher.
etsu had an ncaa d1 allamerican catcher that was also their closer. he got drafted.
its big mistake to make choices to make kids pitchers only in little league or pick their position on the sole basis of them pitching.
yes it would be great but its not reality.


#8

Here’s my two cents worth…

It sounds like your son’s 11+ year old “inside” muscles are “in tune” with his 11+ “outside” body. I’d hate to see him lose his control by asking his inside body to try to do something his outside body is not yet physically ready to do.

I don’t have a medical degree to support my statement, but I have gone through an eerily similar experience when I first began coaching high school ball. I was that “school team” coach you indirectly speak of. Because of my rush to judgement I almost cost one of my players his career in professional baseball. Thanks to the info given me by a doctor friend, I “learned” quickly and stopped what I was doing…and that kid went on to play Triple A ball in the Oakland A’s farm system.

While I’d love to see your son get some experience on the high school mound, common sense tells me otherwise. My suggestion is to let him play another position for his school team this year then finish strong as a pitcher for his Little League club. From what you’ve said he appears to have been used properly as a pitcher (though I don’t know how many pitches he’s thrown in each of his outings). However, the fact that he most often is behind the plate on his non-pitching days is of concern to me. I agree with Chris O’Leary that you should have him play another position. Even though Little League doesn’t permit stealing, the fact that he is continually returning every pitch thrown to him is definitely asking for trouble.

While the jury is still out on just how much a youth should be pitching (i.e. # of pitches as opposed to # of innings) the fact remains that if he pitches on both teams, he’s going from 60’ 6"" to Little League distance…and that definitely is a big difference (as Chris also pointed out).

As a coach (and as a dad - been where you are) I think you should err on the side of caution. Remember, your son can (and probably will) throw for his school team next year. I’m sure his school coach is willing to wait, particularly if he knows he’s getting an ACE!


#9

[quote=“skwezeplay”]Here’s my two cents worth…

It sounds like your son’s 11+ year old “inside” muscles are “in tune” with his 11+ “outside” body. I’d hate to see him lose his control by asking his inside body to try to do something his outside body is not yet physically ready to do.

I don’t have a medical degree to support my statement, but I have gone through an eerily similar experience when I first began coaching high school ball. I was that “school team” coach you indirectly speak of. Because of my rush to judgement I almost cost one of my players his career in professional baseball. Thanks to the info given me by a doctor friend, I “learned” quickly and stopped what I was doing…and that kid went on to play Triple A ball in the Oakland A’s farm system.

While I’d love to see your son get some experience on the high school mound, common sense tells me otherwise. My suggestion is to let him play another position for his school team this year then finish strong as a pitcher for his Little League club. From what you’ve said he appears to have been used properly as a pitcher (though I don’t know how many pitches he’s thrown in each of his outings). However, the fact that he most often is behind the plate on his non-pitching days is of concern to me. I agree with Chris O’Leary that you should have him play another position. Even though Little League doesn’t permit stealing, the fact that he is continually returning every pitch thrown to him is definitely asking for trouble.

While the jury is still out on just how much a youth should be pitching (i.e. # of pitches as opposed to # of innings) the fact remains that if he pitches on both teams, he’s going from 60’ 6"" to Little League distance…and that definitely is a big difference (as Chris also pointed out).

As a coach (and as a dad - been where you are) I think you should err on the side of caution. Remember, your son can (and probably will) throw for his school team next year. I’m sure his school coach is willing to wait, particularly if he knows he’s getting an ACE![/quote]I never counted his pitches and i know in some tournaments he pitched to much.I was lucky that he was taught how to pitch from a couple local high school coaches and he is very good at pitching with correct form.At the end of six innings he’s throwing as hard if not harder than the first couple.I don’t think i’ll let him pitch for school ball since he will still have 3 more years because of his age.The coach really needs him to catch for the B team.Thanks for the replies.I just want to give him every opportunity to be the best he can be without hurting him in the long run.


#10

for whatever my 2 cents are worth…this year i’m not letting my son (just turned 13) pitch for his middle school team at 60’6" . he will pitch for his babe ruth team at a shorter distance. my primary reason for doing that is not wanting the added stress to his shoulder/arm associated with going from 47’ ( LL ) to 60’6". purely precautionary, but as i’ve posted many times there is no reason to push it at this early age … you can focus on the proper mechanics required to deliver the ball from ANY distance.


#11

I’m suprised that middle schoolers are pitching at 60"6". We play USSSA and Super Series which I know is alot more different and advanced than Little League but we don’t throw 60’ 6" until 14 years of age. At 11 & 12, it’s 50’ and at 13 it goes to 54’ before going back at 14 to 60 6". I would think a kid throwing 55mph at 60’ 6" would get lit up pretty good. No way he’s going to get a fastball by anyone at that distance. I bet he’d have to throw pretty flat as well to get it to the catcher which isn’t going to help matters any either.

My advice, pitch him at 60’ 6" when he’s required to, not before.