Question for steve or anyone else who has any comments

obviously I want to reach my potential and was told that I have lots of potential and my dream is to be in the pros but I was wondering what life is like in the pros, like how often were you home during the season, the biggest thing im worried about if I make it to that level is if I were to get married and never hardly see my wife and if I started a family how often I would get to see them and spend time with them.

I would say if you have the potential to become a professional baseball player or athlete, do it and hold off on girlfriends and babies and starting a family until you get settled in the career. Even if you are a stud pro player you may have 10 good years. Once you get established start thinking about a family and the off season will give you plenty of time to spend with them and you can always live where you play and see them every day at home stands. Bottom line is how bad do you want it, if it’s truly your dream it should be easy to put off the other stuff for a few years. Just my take.

The season is 142 games in the minors and 162 in the majors. You get about 1 day off a month and three days off at the All-Star break, if you don’t make the squad. Half the season/games are played on the road.

You also spend the entire month of March at Spring Training in either Florida or Arizona.

Girlfriends? Not easy. Wife? Actually, this can be easier than having a girlfriend. But if you want to see a lot of her, she’ll have to make some significant sacrafices, i.e. move to your team’s home city. Kids? Really tough.

I think George Brett did it right when it came to girlfriend/wife. He was single throughout his entire career. As soon as it was over, he got married and started a family.

ive thought about this myself, ive been with my girlfriend for over 3 years, and i sacrificed a scholarship to D1 sacred heart for her and ended up in a bad D2 so i cud stay at home to be with her, ive thought about what would happen if i were to be drafted and it really depends on what is important to you. i love baseball , but i love my girlfriend and she loves me back, baseball wouldnt miss you but your girlfriend would. sometimes you have to realize that everything isnt about only you.
every1 has their own opinion but that is mine. glad if i helped sorry if i made it more confusing lol

[quote=“qcbaseball”]ive thought about this myself, ive been with my girlfriend for over 3 years, and i sacrificed a scholarship to D1 sacred heart for her and ended up in a bad D2 so i cud stay at home to be with her, ive thought about what would happen if i were to be drafted and it really depends on what is important to you. i love baseball , but i love my girlfriend and she loves me back, baseball wouldnt miss you but your girlfriend would. sometimes you have to realize that everything isnt about only you.
every1 has their own opinion but that is mine. glad if i helped sorry if i made it more confusing lol[/quote]

In this guy’s case, his main priority was his girlfriend. He put baseball secondary. Certainly a personal choice.

Me personally, Family and baseball have been my main priorities ever since I was little. I am currently playing professionally, and I have a fiance. I have a ton of respect for what she has to deal with. At the same time, she knew what she was getting into before we even started dating 3 years ago. You have to be mature about this stuff. I wouldn’t have dated somebody that wasn’t able to handle my career choices. It wouldn’t be fair to me or her. My first year of pro ball I dated a girl who couldn’t handle the distance with my career. Needless to say, that relationship was off in a couple weeks. Again, it goes back to how bad do you want it. Do you really want baseball as a career? If the answer is yes, expect to have to make sacrifices. Remember, it has now become a career, it is your job, not just a sport. There are also plenty of perks of being a pro athlete. What beats getting paid to come to the ball park at 2 pm everyday and work hard at getting better at baseball? That sold me…

This is a great, very mature question.

You’re going to be a good husband and father if you keep this up. :wink:

Most MLers take one of three approaches…

  1. They don’t start their families until they reach free agency and sign longer-term deals. That way they don’t have to miss out on their kids lives. By the time they are having kids, they tend to live in the same place for a few years.

  2. They live in FL or AZ and basically don’t see their families for 8 or 9 months of the year. The advantage is that their wives and kids have a relatively stable life. I could never do this.

  3. Their wives and kids live with them and move when they move. This is disruptive, but keeps the family together. I know Woody Williams took this approach when he was in St. Louis. My son played against his kids for a couple of years. I would see Woody at 3 or 4 games a season.

There are a lot of similarities to what military families go through.

[quote=“Hammer”]In this guy’s case, his main priority was his girlfriend. He put baseball secondary. Certainly a personal choice.

Me personally, Family and baseball have been my main priorities ever since I was little. I am currently playing professionally, and I have a fiance. I have a ton of respect for what she has to deal with. At the same time, she knew what she was getting into before we even started dating 3 years ago. You have to be mature about this stuff. I wouldn’t have dated somebody that wasn’t able to handle my career choices. It wouldn’t be fair to me or her. My first year of pro ball I dated a girl who couldn’t handle the distance with my career. Needless to say, that relationship was off in a couple weeks. Again, it goes back to how bad do you want it. Do you really want baseball as a career? If the answer is yes, expect to have to make sacrifices. Remember, it has now become a career, it is your job, not just a sport. There are also plenty of perks of being a pro athlete. What beats getting paid to come to the ball park at 2 pm everyday and work hard at getting better at baseball? That sold me…[/quote]
Hammer, that’s an awesome explanation. Excellent perspective.

As I told my baby girl when she entered college, trust your instincts and follow your heart…

That follow your heart thing works with chicks, but what about studs like me and Cleveland??? hehhehheh

Good posts, all.

Hose

[quote=“qcbaseball”]but i love my girlfriend and she loves me back,
[/quote]

Awwwwww :eyelove: :eyelove: :lookup:

Just playing with ya. :rofl2:

wait till your career is over, go to vegas, get the pick of the litter.

Baseball will never tell you it doesn’t love you anymore.

A professional career is just that – a career. Whether your profession is medicine, accounting, law or baseball. With respect to a professional baseball career, there are other “pro” avenues other than the Majors and their associates (minors). There are a host of Independent Leagues which offer far less fan-fare, but nevertheless, its the pros.

Your professional routine will include enhancement of your credentials on a regular basis, reviewing the specutive as well as the operative functions of your career choice and so forth. Your first priority IS your profession. Hence, the meaning of the word professional. And in that regard, a true professional is one that is the “go to” person for expert performance and know-how.

I have seen more young men waste their biggest opportunity with not addressing the time necessary to pay their DUES up front and at the beginning of their decision to go pro than anything else.
I am amazed at the lack of professional competancy in the tools of this trade than anything else. More often than not are the rules of the game, time and distance relationships, health and body function cycles, and last but not least - loyality. And on that last one - this pre-occupation with me-myself-an-I thing at the start of one’s career ---- well, let me just stop here.

If your going to pursue a professional career then do it as a professional. You’ve got to be in that frame of mind 24 - 7. No “if’s - an’s - or- buts”. EVERYTHING AND EVERYONE COMES SECOND. Is this too cold? Is this not true? The only way to find out is to place anything ahead of your goal to COMPETE AS A PROFESSONAL. Notice I didn’t say PLAY as a professional – professionals don’t play at anything!

On the other hand if your age and place in life still leaves lots of room for just growing up, so be it. Be realistic too.

Coach B.

or anything else you dont wanna hear or see

wait till your career is over, if you make it, go to vegas, get the pick of the litter.

if you don’t, go to college, find a nice smart girl, she will teach your children.

well, if you think about it, the best players only get up to about to 20 years or so in the majors. and that aint very common or anything. Ripken skipped college (if i remember correctly), and he got 21 years in the majors (23 games in 1981 to his retirement after the 2001 season, i think). made majors at 20, ended at 41.
and then theres guys like clemens who continue well into their 40s (46 this august). whether its the love of the game, the money, or if hes just trying to get the last out of those steroids, i dont know. (i aint trying to start a steroid discussion or nothin)
but then there are guys who nobody every really notices they were ever there, or that they ever left. just kinda disappear. i aint got any examples, cuz like i sed, nobody notices them. I mainly refering to the usual ballplayer, not a ripken, clemens, griffey, or jeter. im talking about those guys who you only know about because you have triples of their rookie card, which only got up to a nickel apiece.
and then there are plenty of guys who are well know, solid players, and they have pretty solid careers. they aint signing those multi-year, nine-figure salaries, but they make it to the bigs, and they stay there for longer than the guys i just mentioned, but not for no 20 years.

so are you gonna give up on a dream? the opportunity to be a star.

i guess i made that longer than was necessary. basically what im saying is that there are guys who go pro and end when there bout 40, others who barely pass 30 before the boot comes. but the thing is, whenever you finish, provided you dont blow ur money in vegas while ur gettin “the pick of the litter” (nice dusty), u should be financially sound in my opinion. if u start ur family then, you won’t have to be worried about leaving work early to catch little jonny’s game. you will be able to watch ur kids grow up without the worries of missing out on anything cuz of work.

i dont know if u get what im saying, but i hope that i could help. and sorry for the poor grammar I used. Its easier to type faster without it.

edit: there are plenty of safe investments out there. especially if you are making a major league salary. whats the minimum, like $350,000 per year? and if ur wife works, then you’ll have plenty of cash, i think. thats just my opinion.

edit II: i cant believe i 4got something else. regret’s suck. if you dont make it, then you can have a family. no regrets. if you do… then you can make your decision on how to do things.
you won’t be able to regret skipping out on your dream.

and come’on? what woman wouldn’t want to brag to her friends about being the wife of a major leaguer :wink: u know they talk about that stuff :wink: