Question for Chris (About Pronation)


#1

I have read on your site (and other places) about forearm pronation but I can’t seem to grasp exactly what is being done by the pitcher.

Is there any way you could explain in simple terms how to pronate the forearm?

Thanks-


#2

To understand the difference between pronation and supination, hold your forearm out as if you were going to turn a doorknob (or shake someone’s hand).

If you rotate your forearm (e.g. twist your wrist) counter-clockwise, then that’s pronation. If you rotate your forearm clockwise, then that’s supination.


#3

Thanks Chris… That’s what I thought it meant but doesn’t this change the delivery of the pitch… impart different spin with the ball coming off the hand differently?

For an amateur pitcher like myself it feels like I’m trying to throw a screwball.


#4

Not necessarily.

Just because you have pronated up to and through the release point it doesn’t mean that you can’t still put pure backspin (or even topspin) on the ball. This is because while the forearm may be pronating the wrist and fingers can be doing something different.

I’ll admit that it does take some getting used to.


#5

I remember when my coach taught some guys that started playing baseball how to throw correctly. And then I went to play some catch with one of the guys.
I remember watching the ball coming with a “side spin”.

It takes some time to get used to throw that way and throw it with a pure backspin.


#6

becuase you said topspin, I’m curious,

How could you throw a curveball while pronating the forearm?


#7

It’s not easy (and I’m still a long way from getting it right).

You have to apply the spin with the fingers (and to a lesser degree the wrist) using a motion somewhat like snapping your fingers. The ball comes over your middle finger.

It’s easier to do if you have long fingers.

If it’s too hard to do while pronating, then you should at least do it with a neutral forearm; the goal is to not achieve the spin by supinating the wrist (which is the common way).


#8

I’m talking 11-7, 12-6, more or a football throw with a turnover. A la Barry Zito. I would say my forearm is pretty neutral, so it’se not huge to change. My hand is pretty darn small so I don’t know if I could even throw it productively. (my little bro is 5’4", I’m 5 11 1/2, and his hand’s as big as mine)


#9

Is it “better” to pronate the forearm while throwing a curveball?

When I throw my curve I do something like a Karate Chop, but I keep my forearm the way it is. This way I can get a 12-6 Curveball spin.
When you pronate your forearm will you get a different spin?

And what would you recommend? Pronating the forearm while throwing a curve or just do a “karate chop”?

Thanks.


#10

Pronating with the forearm is definitely the way to go if you can make it work. You should at least have a neutral forearm (e.g. not pronation or supination).

The problem with the idea of the “karate chop” is that you are by definition supinated (pinkie down) which can cause the bones of your elbow to collide. I think it’s better if your neutral position is palm down.


#11

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
Pronating with the forearm is definitely the way to go if you can make it work. You should at least have a neutral forearm (e.g. not pronation or supination).

The problem with the idea of the “karate chop” is that you are by definition supinated (pinkie down) which can cause the bones of your elbow to collide. I think it’s better if your neutral position is palm down.[/quote]

Thanks, but how would the ball “roll over” my index and middle fingers with the palm down when throwing a curveball?

Or you only have to pronate your forearm after releasing the ball?