Question about topics in 'the art and science of pitching'

i dont fully understand everything that is being said in this book so some of these questions will be a bit dumb

biomechanical imperative #3: opposite and equal arms

tom states that from hand break to external rotation of the throwing arm the glove side arm should mirror the throwing arm and not the other way around (throwing arm mirroring glove side)

i was always under the impression that you come to a stage at foot plant called ‘high cocked’ position where your throwing arm elbow is slightly below your shoulder and the glove is tucked in with your elbow pointing to the target while your hips are starting to open… this wouldn’t be opposite and equal arms as described by house. also, as house describes it when you come to your high cocked position with equal and opposite arms you would be in a position where you would look like your showing off your biceps which i dont see anyone in the majors doing… whats his reasoning behind this or did i misunderstand?

biomechanical imperative #2: stride and momentum

he states that a pitcher should life hit front knee towards the back shoulder as high as possible without changing the starting posture. this is what ive been doing naturally but was told to raise my front leg straight up.

“Why can’t the English…learn to speak?” Or write—intelligibly, so that non-college professors can understand it?
You say you’ve been doing some things naturally—I would suggest that you keep on doing what you’ve been doing and not allow anyone to mess around with your pitching delivery, as long as you’re getting the ball in the strike zone and you’re comfortable with it. Trying to make sense of what someone is saying can only result in the great-grandfather of all headaches, you name the brand. For example—
You’ve probably been exposed to a million theories about how to throw the slider. And if you’ve noticed, there’s an awful lot of abstruse explanation and what-not, with everyone having his own idea—and failing to express it understandably, darn it! I remember when I learned the pitch, at the age of 16, and there may have been luck involved but I happened to ask the right person about it. He was an active major-league pitcher who doubled as an extra pitching coach for his team, and he drew me aside and showed me how to throw it. No complicated theories or abstruse gobbledegook. He told me, “Throw it like a curve, but roll your wrist, don’t snap it.” He showed me the off-center grip he used, demonstrated the wrist action, then handed me the ball he had with him and said “Go ahead, try it.” And in about ten minutes I got the hang of it. I worked with it over the winter, and it became my strikeout pitch.
This guy noted that I was a natural sidearmer who, though not very fast, could and did throw hard and used a slide-step which added some speed to my delivery. He worked with me for a little over three years and showed me how to make the most of what I had. Now why can’t more coaches do this??? And now I get off the soapbox.

the problem is i wasnt getting the ball in the strike zone. thats y people were messing with my mechanics

im just trying to find out why i have no control

[quote=“OffSet”]i dont fully understand everything that is being said in this book so some of these questions will be a bit dumb

biomechanical imperative #3: opposite and equal arms

tom states that from hand break to external rotation of the throwing arm the glove side arm should mirror the throwing arm and not the other way around (throwing arm mirroring glove side)[/quote]
The point here being that he wants you to make adjustments to the glove arm - not the throwing arm.

I’d have to go back and read this section but I wouldn’t worry about the high cocked position and your elbow height. Most pitchers are fine and the ones who aren’t have probably been inappropriately messed with. As for tucking your glove and pointing your elbow, that is a cookie cutter teach. Lots of different pitchers have different glove arm actions. There is no one right way to do things. So, if you bend your throwing arm, bend your glove arm the same amount. If you hook the throwing wrist, hook the glove wrist. And, remember that equal and opposite needs to happen at foot plant for proper timing but it only needs to happen for a passing moment. Guys like Clemens sweep their glove across in front of them but they do get to equal and opposite at foot plant.

[quote]biomechanical imperative #2: stride and momentum

he states that a pitcher should life hit front knee towards the back shoulder as high as possible without changing the starting posture. this is what ive been doing naturally but was told to raise my front leg straight up.[/quote]
Again, I’d have to go reread this part of the book but he doesn’t recommend all pitchers lift their front knee to their back shoulder. He recognizes that this is part of a pitcher’s style and will differ from pitcher to pitcher. So, he’s ok with lifting the front knee to the front shoulder or to the back shoulder, or taking it straight back toward 2B, or even flicking the front foot back toward 2B.