Question about scalp loading


#1

does the actual loading of the scalp after or before glove foot?

the reason why I’m asking is because my pro pitchers shoulders are reversed rotated toward the descent to the plate and as there shoulder rotate into the straight line there back elbow looks pinched behind there back.

i also have another question, is it harmful or decrease velocity for your throwing elbow to be behind your shoulder when you land and start to rotate around? (should it be in line with your shoulders?)


#2

[quote=“workhorse”]does the actual loading of the scalp after or before glove foot?

the reason why I’m asking is because my pro pitchers shoulders are reversed rotated toward the descent to the plate and as there shoulder rotate into the straight line there back elbow looks pinched behind there back.

i also have another question, is it harmful or decrease velocity for your throwing elbow to be behind your shoulder when you land and start to rotate around? (should it be in line with your shoulders?)[/quote]

You lost me at “scalp”


#3

Look at MLB pitchers and watch what they do.


#4

yeah, i really cant tell when the loading of the scaps occur becuase the elbows already behind the back before they land.


#5

Well lets take a look at some images shall we.


Notice how his foot is not all the way down yet and his scaps are loaded but his forearm is not in high cocked yet (IMO how the scap load is finished)

Notice how now his foot has landed and his hips are opening up. His scaps are loaded and his forearm is in the high cocked position thus completing the scap-load.

I hope I helped. If you have anymore questions just feel free to ask.


#6

I know that it happens, but are there specific drills that can help somebody get that scapular loading into their throwing motion. Also, what age does somebody start helping a pitcher throw like that?


#7

Why are you interested in forcing shoulder horizontal abduction - better known as “scap loading?”


#8

Why are you interested in forcing shoulder horizontal abduction - better known as “scap loading?”[/quote]

That’s what Nolan Ryan did, and basically all mlb pitchers do. Shouldn’t we try to pitch like mlb pitchers?

IDK… I kinda want to go pro.


#9

My view on scap loading is that if you try to teach a pitcher to scap load or work on scap loading, that is going to cause problems. Scap loading, from my perspective, happens naturally as the hips rotate. If you try and teach it, pitchers will probably end up blowing open with their front side causing mechanical and arm (mainly elbow) problems.


#10

If I do not teach myself to scap load, then there is probably no hope of me ever throwing hard enough to go pro.


#11

If I do not teach myself to scap load, then there is probably no hope of me ever throwing hard enough to go pro.[/quote]

Are you sure? This could be a natural process.

You are too focused on what MLB pitchers do without actually understanding the underlying reasons for it, IMO. Forcibly “loading the scap” can lead to serious shoulder injuries.


#12

If I do not teach myself to scap load, then there is probably no hope of me ever throwing hard enough to go pro.[/quote]

Are you sure? This could be a natural process.

You are too focused on what MLB pitchers do without actually understanding the underlying reasons for it, IMO. Forcibly “loading the scap” can lead to serious shoulder injuries.[/quote]

No. Contrary to what many people think the arm does produce velocity through the pectoral muscles and the unload process.

The only way to achieve a forceful unload of the scaps and produce velocity is to load the scaps. I don’t believe its a product of rotation, since the highest degree occurs before rotation


#13

If I do not teach myself to scap load, then there is probably no hope of me ever throwing hard enough to go pro.[/quote]

Are you sure? This could be a natural process.

You are too focused on what MLB pitchers do without actually understanding the underlying reasons for it, IMO. Forcibly “loading the scap” can lead to serious shoulder injuries.[/quote]

It will probably only lead to serious injuries if done or taught incorrectly.

If I understand it correctly the underlying reason for scap loading is pinching the scaps and stretching your pectoral muscles to create a rubber band effect, intern creating more velocity.

I will be teaching myself the way that I think will be the safest to scap load. I just personally think that is will be almost impossible to reach 90-95 mph without scap loading.

This is a great discussion, please post back with your views on scap loading safely.


#14

If I do not teach myself to scap load, then there is probably no hope of me ever throwing hard enough to go pro.[/quote]

Are you sure? This could be a natural process.

You are too focused on what MLB pitchers do without actually understanding the underlying reasons for it, IMO. Forcibly “loading the scap” can lead to serious shoulder injuries.[/quote]

No. Contrary to what many people think the arm does produce velocity through the pectoral muscles and the unload process.

The only way to achieve a forceful unload of the scaps and produce velocity is to load the scaps. I don’t believe its a product of rotation, since the highest degree occurs before rotation[/quote]

lol, you posted right before I did and said basically the same thing. :slight_smile:


#15

Scap loading to me has to do with flexibility of the whole torso region. As I am sitting here, I am scap loading and trying to feel my muscles work. I think you can improve flexibility of scaps, pecs, etc… in the weight room and through training, but I wouldn’t incorporate it into your mechanics. If you focus on scap loading, to me you are going to overcompensate for something your body isn’t trained for you to do, thus hurting yourself.