Question about My Mechanics?

I can’t believe you’re still whining about how DM posted in response to you.
God, do we need to sugar coat it, and build up your self esteem, tuck you in at night and tell you everything is going to be alright? Seriously man. DM is an excellent person to get advice from, and you I can garuntee know far less in the ways of pitching than he does.

[quote=“SnakeManiac72”]I can’t believe you’re still whining about how DM posted in response to you.
God, do we need to sugar coat it, and build up your self esteem, tuck you in at night and tell you everything is going to be alright? Seriously man. DM is an excellent person to get advice from, and you I can garuntee know far less in the ways of pitching than he does.[/quote]Exactly, dm59 has built up a repuatation, and you have not, don’t try to talk bad about someone with a better repuatation than yourself.

When I said you, I meant Hoovedawg, not snakemaniac, just to make sure you understood it correctly.

Heh yeah Tanner, my post wasn’t for you lol.

Gentlemen
Thanks for the support here but I really don’t want to get into an argument with anyone.

Hoovedawg
My intentions here have always been good. I like to help and hope I have. You’re right about my first posts seeming like I’m “…talking to someone who knows absolutly nothing about pitching.” Without any better information, I have to simply assume that you don’t know much about the topic and are looking for help. Because of that, it very easily could look condescending. I meant no disrespect or malice when I told you that your mechanics could be improved. I sincerely believed that our conversations could be much more productive if you did some more homework first. I then wrote a fairly long post on what I think could help.

Was anything I said about your mechanics not true? I really only commented on what I saw. No judgement. Just a statement of what the video showed, in my personal opinion only, of course. Really, by me or anyone else pointing out what we believe are issues, you gain direction. Don’t just take my word for anything, though. I’m just one guy and it’s all simply my opinion.

If you believe I had less than honorable intentions, you have me figured incorrectly. I put a lot of time and energy into my posts and I do it because I like to help. I know you’ve posted on other sites and got some very good advice there. There are some guys there (hsbaseballweb) who I couldn’t hold a candle to regarding pitching. They’re very good. Take that seriously, read what advice I posted and let’s talk. If I can help, I will but I have to point out the areas I think are holding you back in order to do that.

So, Snakemaniac and Tanner, once again, I very much appreciate the kind words.

Hoove. If you want to continue with a hopefully productive discussion, you must stop thinking that I have anything other than good intentions. If you believe that about me, you just don’t really know me. So, I’d like to consider this matter closed and move on to what this board has been so good for, that being open discussion about how to improve. If you have more video, post it. If you want to debate something, great. If you have questions, fire away. I’m all ears.

[quote=“dm59”]I gave you far better advice than any specific talk about a mechanical issue ever could. I pointed you to some things to do some research on and THEN we can talk. I honestly believe this will be the most productive thing you can possibly do. I’m not trying to be difficult. You’ll benefit in the long run if you just spend a day or two reading about this stuff in general. Our discussions will then be so much more effective.

BUT, if you insist, here are some specifics:

  1. Generate some momentum, sideways toward the plate before anything else opens up or rotates.
  2. Lengthen your stride, not for it’s own sake, but for the express purpose of achieving #1.
  3. Now, you must turn that linear motion toward the plate into rotational energy that moves up from component to component in the body (links in the chain).
  4. At each “link” point, or transfer point, the “connection” must be made at the point of maximum velocity of the previous link or component.
  5. Each “transfer” must happen smoothly.
  6. No pauses in the entire process. Pauses allow energy built up to be dissipated and you must start all over again in the next part of the body.
  7. Into landing, rotate the core, hips, knees and feet. Spin the back leg on it’s axis to assist in getting full and powerful hip rotation. Drive that back hip around the front one that has just been stopped by the front leg.
  8. During all of this lower body rotation into landing, the throwing arm and the back of your hand move up THROUGH the infamous high cocked position. This happens simultaneous with the lower body rotation. The shoulders remain aligned between 2nd and home during this. This is a very difficult thing to learn. Different things happening in 2 different parts of the body. It’s a timing and coordination thing to work on.
  9. When the front foot lands, the hip rotation you just set up and was fueled by the momentum generated during the stride gets transferred up into the torso, causing a stretch because the hips have rotated before the shoulders. This stretch, if timed correctly and is done smoothly, fuels a more powerful shoulder rotation. This is one of the most important “momentum transfer points” in the whole “kinetic chain”.
  10. Rotate the shoulders and bring the elbow toward the target while the throwing arm is “rag loose”. If the timing is correct, the forearm will lay back to horizontal as you rotate the shoulders.
  11. The NPA, as Roger can attest, state that this shoulder rotation is most effectively done with an upright spine.
  12. Flex the upper body forward, bringing the chest out over the front foot and “catapult” the throwing hand toward release. The bend in the elbow goes from near 90 deg. when it was laid back to close to zero at release (as per Glen Fleisig of ASMI).
  13. Continue the forward flexion of the torso and the follow through of the arm in a “long arc of deceleration” to a “flat back finish”. This is where the throwing arm has gradually slowed down and finishes somewhere outside of the landing leg. The hips and shoulders have “fully” rotated. The back leg has spun inward as far as it can.
  14. I’d love to see the glove get tucked in beside and a little ahead of the glove side chest, for protection against the line drive coming back at you.

That’s the best I can do right now. I’m sure some others will, and hopefully they will, chime in to add to or dispute some of what I listed.[/quote]

GREAT post D.M. Just remember you can lead a horse to water but you cannot make him drink!! I will be the first to say that sometimes people learn things for there own good. In other words who cares where the info comes from or how one gets it. As long as its correct and they get it, does it really matter where it comes from or whom it comes from? In this case you went beyond that and actually tried to list some of the major components that make up a good delivery with sound mechanics. Some just want that one fish versus learning how to fish so they can catch one everyday by themselves!!!At any rate good post, you have done your job!!!

Hey Chin
Thanks a lot for that. It is very much appreciated.

The interesting thing about this is that we are all doing this, not for money but because it interests us and we enjoy helping out. Taking s**t because someone doesn’t like the advice is going to happen I guess. I don’t think Hoovedawg really understands the value of what was given. At least I think there was value there. :wink: The jury’s always out on that.

This juror says there’s definitely some value there. But I don’t think some folks realize what that value is. There are guys on the Internet who charge money for video analysis. You send them a video along with some $$$ and they do the analysis. Those of us on this website that do it for free do it because, as DM said, we enjoy helping people out.

When I analyze someone’s video on this site, it is not uncommon for me to spend 30-45 minutes of my time reviewing the video and typing a response. I’m willing to do that to help people but, obviously, there’s a limit as to how much of my time I can devote to this. In fact, I know there have been videos posted that I didn’t analyze only because I just didn’t have the time. Of course, if I were to catch grief from someone I was trying to help, I probably wouldn’t bother trying to help them in the future. In fact, there is one person on this board who PM’d me with a question. I sent a nice response but never even got a “thanks”. Do you think I’m inclined to help that person out again? I’m not saying I expect anything in return when I help folks out but, when someone helps you out, a simple “thanks” is appropriate.

[quote=“dm59”]Hey Chin
Thanks a lot for that. It is very much appreciated.

The interesting thing about this is that we are all doing this, not for money but because it interests us and we enjoy helping out. Taking s**t because someone doesn’t like the advice is going to happen I guess. I don’t think Hoovedawg really understands the value of what was given. At least I think there was value there. :wink: The jury’s always out on that.[/quote]

D.M, first off your very welcome. Your points were of value and so many people could benefit from those points IF they took the time to really dig deep and explore what you stated. good job!

This juror says there’s definitely some value there. But I don’t think some folks realize what that value is. There are guys on the Internet who charge money for video analysis. You send them a video along with some $$$ and they do the analysis. Those of us on this website that do it for free do it because, as DM said, we enjoy helping people out.

When I analyze someone’s video on this site, it is not uncommon for me to spend 30-45 minutes of my time reviewing the video and typing a response. I’m willing to do that to help people but, obviously, there’s a limit as to how much of my time I can devote to this. In fact, I know there have been videos posted that I didn’t analyze only because I just didn’t have the time. Of course, if I were to catch grief from someone I was trying to help, I probably wouldn’t bother trying to help them in the future. In fact, there is one person on this board who PM’d me with a question. I sent a nice response but never even got a “thanks”. Do you think I’m inclined to help that person out again? I’m not saying I expect anything in return when I help folks out but, when someone helps you out, a simple “thanks” is appropriate.[/quote]

Roger, Your posts seem to always come with a sense of goodness and class, thats a compliment to you as a person as well as writer. More importantly the advice is always well meant and solid in context. As I have stated to you before “you have come along way baby, a long way”!!! Keep up the good work you are a major contributor to so many threads on this site.

Hey Chin
I agree with you here. Roger’s a good one. I met him a couple of weeks ago in Phoenix and found him to be a very nice guy with a huge desire to help out. He keeps me on my toes. I think this board benefits from someone with his background re: Tom House and the NPA. That’s been a hole in my overall knowledge and I’m learning from him on this.

Chin/DM,

Thanks for the kind words, guys. The feeling is mutual.

Yeah, DM and I met here in Phoenix a couple weeks ago. Being the pitching “geeks” that we are, we spent a few hours looking at video clips of pro pitchers and talking mechanics. DM did a god job of filling me in on Nyman and Mills.

I expect you guys and everyone else to keep me on my toes.

Im not 100 percent sure but i beilive that ur left foot should be pointing down more pointing towards the ground rather towards the sky like in your video