Question about college

hey so i’m a sophomore so probably a little early to be thinking of playing college baseball. but i’ve got a question regarding the pitching side of it. when scouts for college look at a prospect do they look more for potential or for what they already have? what i’m saying is does the scout look at a guy who is a smart pitcher with less arm but more command and pitching iq or a guy who throws the ball through a wall but is less refined in his pitching. my question is between these two types of pitchers which one usually is placed higher on a scouts radar? so in high school should i be trying to get hitters out using all my pitches with location and maybe less speed? or should i be trying to show my fastball as much as possible? thanks guys

It really depends on what level of college ball you would be playing. For most D1 colleges they would hardly give you a look if you arent throwing high 80’s or 90+, endless you had some incomparable stuff. The thing is, most of the time, you can teach a kid to throw more accurate, but it isnt practical to teach a kid to throw harder.

I wouldnt worry about that as a sophmore though. Also if you are planning on playing some D3 or something, everything kinda changes.

Scouts are all going to be looking for different things, so you can’t be everything to everyone. The number one objective you should have is to win for yourself and your team. When you do this, and if you have the talent to get to the next level, things will work themselves out.

There are smaller points you can do too to get noticed like getting to some good camps, getting good grades, etc… Take some time to do a search on this forum and you can learn some more about that.

Stu

Here’s the thing about college- even high schools to some degree.

The crop of talent is not static, it changes year after year, sometimes even within the season. Injuries, sickness, Here’s the thing about college- even high schools to some degree.

The crop of talent is not static, it changes year after year, sometimes even within the season. Injuries, sickness, eligibility, endurance and tolerance levels, are just some of things that coaches have to deal with. Also in the mix is the recruitment population on hand from one coaching staff - a staff that’s gone elsewhere, that a new coaching staff has to work with. Not easy by any stretch of the imagination.

College teams are usually made up of players not that far from the institution. Relationships are developed over time from all sorts of playing environments - high schools, Legion Posts, summer leagues, alumni and booster clubs, travel teams, church leagues - CYO for example, and other independent sources. College and university coaches make it there business to know what’s-what here. There livelihood depends on it.

But again, remember that this composition of players is constantly changing - year after year, season after season. Heck, even some coaching staffs experience no less. It happens.

In any event, a roster of players is like a tool box - certain generic tools for just about any equation, then the fine-tuned specialty stuff for just that right occasion. But, in all if not most instances, there is a certain water mark that everyone has to measure up to. It’s that water mark that you have to be most concerned with. Want to pitch? Look at what you’re replacing right now in the rotation. Who’s doing what? What’s their track record? What’s the measuring rod that you have to compare yourself to?

Now if all this sounds overwhelming - it’s not. Figure out first what are the institutions within 300 mile radius of your location. Then, toss out those institutions, that for whatever reason, you have no interest in. You now have a listing, refined by your specific needs or situation to choose from. Call up their rosters and see what that club expects from it’s pitchers — where do they come from, what added value to they bring to the club, what program did they come from, etc.

Then look for prospect camp announcements of those institutions that your interested in, and make a showing. Better you go to them, then they look for you. Oh, and don’t forget to go prepared to show you best side - cooperate fully, listen by looking your coaches in the eye, not looking on the ground.

So, if your going to replace the tools that any institution has been use to dealing with, know what those tools have been over the years, and what they’re using now. It just simplifies the process for you.

Coach B.

thanks for the advice :slight_smile: being in vermont there’s not much within a 300 mile radius that would be a good baseball school. but this advice should help me when the time comes to look at colleges in the not so far future.

… being in vermont there’s not much within a 300 mile radius that would be a good baseball school.

These institutions have very good baseball programs, so, within 300 miles of most cities in Vermont, are the following institutions:

University of Maine
University of Massachusetts
Boston College
Northeastern University
University of Albany
University of Hartford
University of Connecticut
Holy Cross
Sacred Heart University
Yale
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Brown University
Bryant University
St Bonaventure University

Best wishes with your baseball plans.

Coach B.

Sienna in NY is also good. As are a number of schools in the eastern part of Upstate NY.