Question about catcher signs


#1

if you have a fastball that can cut, sink, dive and go straight to the catcher’s glove or a change-up that dives, sink, go straight do you have to get differents signs?


#2

Really, It all depends on your catcher. You might want to talk to him and ask. If he says the sign for fastball and he doesn’t care what type, then you will just have one sign, but if you have all those and your catcher tells you, you have diffenrent signs then you do. It really all depends on you and your catcher. You might want to talk to whoever you are throwing to.


#3

If you have a fastball that can do all those things, someone should sign you to a pro contract!

Seriously though … the fastballs can be called by one signal and a location, except a cutter which is really a variation on the slider and should be called separately. The change-up can also be called with one signal and a location.

And as the previous person suggested, it’s really up to your catcher and how prepared he wants to be for the pitches coming in.


#4

that was a question i didn’t say I have a fastball I say if you have which in people mind should sounds totally different but yeah thanks to answer my question.


#5

At a young age where no-one really has a sinker worth noting, I would say it doesn’t matter. But from experience, when you have guys throwing excellent sinkers/2-seamers, yes. It does matter.


#6

When I was 12 I had to have a sign for my 4 seam and 2 seam. It was like a Sinker and Catchers at that age sometimes aren’t prepared for that


#7

I would say that a lot depends on your catcher and whether or not he knows your stuff and what you can do with it.
When I was pitching, many moons ago, I had a catcher who knew my stuff and so we never had any problems. I was a snake-jazzer, not much on speed but with a lot of good breaking stuff, and so we had signals for things like the knuckle-curve, the slider, the palm ball and what have you; the one time I would signal the catcher what I was going to throw was when I was going to crossfire the pitch. On occasion, when I had to work with a substitute catcher who didn’t know my repertoire I would get together with him and tell him that I would call the pitches, which certainly took a lot of pressure off him;all he had to do was position his glove in the general area where he wanted the pitch and I would take care of the rest.
One thing that really gets my goat is when, with a runner on first, the catcher will call for nothing but fast balls simply because he feels he has a better shot at throwing the runner out at second. What happens is that the batter, knowing this, can set himself for a fast ball knowing full well he’s going to get it—and BLAM, over the fence it goes! I’ve seen this all too often—yes, in the major leagues too—and even after all these decades it still makes me see red! :x