Quest about Beginner curve


#1

Ok can some one help my with a Beginner curvei know how to hold it but not throw it can some one help plz :?:


#2

As I read before from you, you are still having control issues. Are your control issues with your curveball or does that include your fastball and changeup?

Earlier you said that you throw a curveball so to work on what you are doing it would be interesting to see by a video or hear what you are doing right now to throw your curve.

AS far as how to throw a curve at 13, I think you are going to get a lot of advice but honestly I wouldn’t mess with one until you find a pitching coach that you really trust. There has been lots of discussion of if you should throw a curve at your age or not, but the reality is that only if you learn how to throw the curve “the right way” then there is no problem to throwing one. But if you learn to throw it the wrong way then you can really jack your arm.


#3

[quote=“buwhite”]As I read before from you, you are still having control issues. Are your control issues with your curveball or does that include your fastball and changeup?

Earlier you said that you throw a curveball so to work on what you are doing it would be interesting to see by a video or hear what you are doing right now to throw your curve.[/quote]

my fb i have perfect control and changeup i just dont now how tot thorw the curve like overhand etc and soz about the pm lol


#4

Back to my other comment of, find someone who knows how to “teach” you a curve ball the proper way. Since you have perfect control of your FB and CU then you know it will take you 6-8 months of work once you get the basic mechanics before you can add it to pitch in a game with.


#5

mk thanks is the regular curve easier then the begining curve?


#6

About the same, I think it really depends on how big your hand is, I think the beginner curve is easier for smaller hands, but for good hitters it’s easier to pick up at the release point because you can pick it up when you see the index finger pointing out.


#7

ok ty ui just tried side arm and i have perfect control with my fastball but my curve breaks to early and how can i throw a cu side arm and thanks for the help your awsome and do u think its a good idea to pitch to a defender net? thanks ~brandon


#8

On the “Defender Net” I am assuming you mean pitching into a net vs to a catcher, well there is really not difference, just pitch, your mechanics shouldn’t change not matter where you pitch to.

Side arm change up, I don’t really have an opinion, I really feel that your arm slot should be where you feel comfortable. I know that some big leaguers have extended their pitching careers by converting to side armers and some guys go to 3/4 or lower to get more movement on their pitches (this includes one of my kids) but you might want to see if Zita Carno might have an opinion on that sidearm Change ups.

If your Curveball breaks too early I would think you aren’t throwing it hard enough, I have noticed that guys slow down their arm action on their curve sometimes and all that does is 1) tip the pitch to the hitter 2) get the pitch to move early. I feel that the harder you throw a curveball the later the break is.


#9

Hi, Brandon.
When I was eleven years old, oh these many moons ago, I discovered that I had a natural sidearm delivery, and the funny thing was what came attached to it—a pretty nice little curve ball. so I figured, okay, I’ve got a curve ball, let me see what I can do with it. After a little experimentation I found that for me the best way to throw it was with a sharp karate-chop wrist snap, which made the pitch break sharply. I would suggest that you work with your curve ball the same way—use a regular curveball grip and throw it with that wrist snap; the so-called “beginner’s curve” is too easy for the batters to pick up.
As for your control issues, here’s something I used to do when I was a little snip and continued well into my playing days: I would get a catcher—nothing beats a real live one—and we would go to an unused playing field where I would take the mound and he would set up behind the plate with his mitt. We would then play a little game we called “ball and strike”, in which he would position his mitt in various places—high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head :lol:, and I would work on getting the ball smack-dab into the pocket of the mitt. It was great fun and a terrific workout, and what a satisfying feeling it was to hear that resounding “THWACK” as the ball hit the pocket of that mitt. We would go at it for an hour at a time, and at times we would have someone stand in the batter’s box, on either side, so I could really zero in on the strike zone (which, in my day, was a lot bigger than it is now). Believe me, I can’t think of a better way to sharpen up one’s control!
Oh, I know, it will take time—Yankee Stadium, or any other ballpark, was not built in a day.
You say you have great control of your fast ball when you throw sidearm; I would recommend that you stick with that arm slot. It’s actually the easiest on the arm and the shoulder, because your elbow is on a level with your shoulder. And do work on getting a good changeup; I recommend the palm ball (the first changeup I acquired), because it’s easy to pick up, easy to throw and control, and you can do a lot with it. Oh yeah—if you find that you’re still having trouble with the curve ball, you might consider the slider—a lot of pitchers who have had trouble with the curve do very nicely with the slider. Just be sure to find yourself a really good pitching coach who knows his elbow from third base and learn the right way to throw that pitch. :slight_smile:


#10

Thanks i practict for 4/hours and i got my curve down my chaneg down palm and fb now all i need to do is work on my slider thanks soo much :slight_smile:


#11

When I told the guy who would become my pitching coach that I just wanted to ask him something about the slider, his response was to take me aside and show me how to throw a good one. He said, “Throw it like a curve, but roll your wrist, don’t snap it.” He showed me the grip he used—it was really offcenter, with the index and middle fingers very close together and the middle finger just touching one seam, and he demonstrated the wrist action he used. Because I threw my curve with the karate-chop wrist snap, I took his instructions to mean that I should ease up on it—kind of like a chef flipping a pancake or a crepe. I got the hang of the pitch in about ten minutes, but I knew I wasn’t going to master it in a week—it took me almost nine months before I felt comfortable enough with it to use it in a game. that slider became my strikeout pitch.
He also told me that just about any pitch can be turned into a nice changeup, and he demonstrated a few such for me. I grabbed a couple of them and added them to my arsenal. And yes, about the curve ball: the harder you throw it the later it will break. In any event, go to it, and have fun with your collection of pitches. :slight_smile:


#12

thanks


#13

And now—let me tell you about the crossfire.
This is not a pitch. It’s a beautiful—and lethal—move that works only with the sidearm delivery, and here’s how it works. You go into the full windup—or the stretch—or no windup at all a la Don Larsen—but instead of pitching directly to the plate you take one step (toward third base if you’re a righthander, toward first base if you’re a lefty)—and you whip around with your whole body and fire the pitch into the plate from that angle. Since you are a sidearmer, you should have a lot of fun working this one up. I remember when I discovered the crossfire, I was about thirteen, and I fell so in love with the delivery that I wound up using it about 85 percent of the time—a fact that was not lost on my pitching coach. One day he was helping me resolve a problem with my circle change, and he said “I know you’re going to crossfire it. You use that move with everything you throw.” I did, and I had so much fun watching the batters get all discombobulated. :slight_smile: 8)


#14

tht sounds cool il try it tomz and do u have any reamdes for a tooth ache’s?


#15

That? I’m afraid not. But I have one guaranteed to give opposing hitters the great-grandmother of all headaches: a two-hit shutout, no walks, eight strikeouts. :slight_smile:


#16

lol ok and were do u live ??


#17

[quote=“Zita Carno”]When I told the guy who would become my pitching coach that I just wanted to ask him something about the slider, his response was to take me aside and show me how to throw a good one. He said, “Throw it like a curve, but roll your wrist, don’t snap it.” He showed me the grip he used—it was really offcenter, with the index and middle fingers very close together and the middle finger just touching one seam, and he demonstrated the wrist action he used. Because I threw my curve with the karate-chop wrist snap, I took his instructions to mean that I should ease up on it—kind of like a chef flipping a pancake or a crepe. I got the hang of the pitch in about ten minutes, but I knew I wasn’t going to master it in a week—it took me almost nine months before I felt comfortable enough with it to use it in a game. that slider became my strikeout pitch.
He also told me that just about any pitch can be turned into a nice changeup, and he demonstrated a few such for me. I grabbed a couple of them and added them to my arsenal. And yes, about the curve ball: the harder you throw it the later it will break. In any event, go to it, and have fun with your collection of pitches. :)[/quote] ok lol


#18

In snswer to your last question, I live in Tampa, FL—and I’m glad it’s getting warm again. I froze my rear end off this past winter, it was so cold! But I like your location even better—on the pitcher’s mound. :slight_smile:


#19

ty i wish yoyu lived in corssville tn so u could help me lol


#20

Take the advice from this forum, and it will be like you have someone there. You really should start to get some video of your pitching up then we can really help more specifically for you situation.