Pushups

do pushups help u gain velocity or having anything to do with your pitching

I think the biggest benefit of push-ups to a pitcher is increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. Don’t count on them increasing velocity.

Generally speaking no, and they can cause problems by leading to muscle imbalances (e.g. they work the accelerator muscles but not the brakes). It is better to focus on exercises that are focused on the muscles of the shoulder and that work both sides of the muscle groups.

Push ups are great exercises and can help develop the SCAPS. Also you are using your body’s weight. THe son has been doing them for years along with crunches and situps. I can’t recommend them enough espeically for young kids.

When I was rehabbing my TJ one of the things that my Dr told me was to make sure I was doing my pushups, because they help the back of the shoulder/scaps a lot.

I couldn’t of said it better myself! :lol:

The problem is that you can end up destabilizing the joint if you don’t work both sides of the muscle pairs; if you don’t work both the accelerators and the decelerators.

If you are going to do push-ups, then I recommend that you not bring your elbows behind your shoulders. Generally, that means you shouldn’t lower your chest all the way to the ground. Taking the chest to the ground places a lot of stress on the muscles at the front of the rotator cuff.

I have worked with several people whose shoulder problems grew out of how they did pushups and bench presses.

Best article I’ve read on the bench press for baseball players
by Steve Zawrotny
http://www.baseballfit.com/baseball_bench_press.htm

Here’s an interesting quote from it as well

[quote]
The late great trainer Mel Siff makes this important and interesting point:

 "The shoulder joint is ballistically thrust much further back (extended) during sprinting and fast running than any form of barbell bench pressing, and for many more reps at a time. The force imposed on the shoulder joint under these conditions can exceed that experienced by the average recreational bench 

presser, so does that mean that we should not forcefully swing the arms back when we run?"

 And of course, baseball and softball players sprint a great deal during their games and practices, right?[/quote]

Also, I have also read an article showing pitchers untrained in bench press gaining 4% velocity from 10 week bench program (also did back work I believe) While a group that trained upperbody with medicine ball work did not show a velocity increase.

Edit:

Now all that being said I think that musclular imbalance can be brought on a player if he does in fact only work his chest. Imbalanced lead to injury and such. But at the same time I have no problem with pitchers doing either the bench press or the pushup, when done correctly within a well rounded training program.

Im not a pro on push-ups but aren’t there differnet ways to do pushups to train all the muscles in the scap area, (ie fingers facing outward, inward and straight ahead)

Would that counter act the imbalance of the muscle?

The problem is that you can end up destabilizing the joint if you don’t work both sides of the muscle pairs; if you don’t work both the accelerators and the decelerators.[/quote]
I certainly wasn’t endorsing working the front side without working the back side. In fact, I have my pitchers work the back side more that the front because, while the front side has 3 muscle groups to accelerate the arm, the back side only had 2 muscle groups to decelerate the arm.

[quote=“RTusk40”]Im not a pro on push-ups but aren’t there differnet ways to do pushups to train all the muscles in the scap area, (ie fingers facing outward, inward and straight ahead)

Would that counter act the imbalance of the muscle?[/quote]
Using the three hand positions to do certain exercises is good in that it helps increse strength in the different positions a pitcher’s hand/arm encounter when throwing fastballs, curves, and change-ups. Tom House and the NPA endorse such an approach.

But the imbalance issue is really a separate issue where the muscles that accelerate the arm are much stronger than the muscles that decelerate arm. This allows the arm to travel faster that the decelerators can handle which, in turn, over-taxes the decelerators and puts more stress on the smaller muscles and connective tissue. The likely result is an injury.