Proper throwing mechanics

I used to throw with a “whipping” motion, my throwing arm would start bent and flexible but- as my delivery continue- my throwing arm would straighten out completly and my arm motion wasn’t as fluid. Last monday, I sat down with the pitching coach to examine my mechanics on our slow motion video program. He told me to maintain a bent-flexible arm and to pick the ball up with the elbow, which I fully believe in.

Now, I’ve been practicing throwing a soft ball against the wall in my dorm and I can feel my arm has a slingshot or rubber band feel. When I throw, I feel my forearm laid back behind the shoulder.

It doesn’t hurt me or my arm at all, its just the first time I’ve ever thrown this way before. Is this how you want your arm to feel?

Picking up the ball with the elbow is bad, it won’t hurt you if you are an infielder but if you pitch, I’d advise a down-out-and up type of arm action. more fluid than the drop & pull up, and it produces more velocity.

if you throw strikes with something on it, get people out, and it doesn’t hurt, get after it.

start doing more than talking and nit picking. if your stride is 90% of your height or better, your front foot comes down in the same place relatively close to a straight line toward your target, you are throwing strikes and training to build arm strength, you aren’t going to break unless your genetics were going to cause you to break anyway.

baseball is not an exact science. get out there and play the game and enjoy it. you can learn some things but most of the stuff you learn after fundamentals will not help you until you reach elite levels of play.

Why will it hurt a pitcher and not an infielder?

[quote=“dusty delso”]if you throw strikes with something on it, get people out, and it doesn’t hurt, get after it.

start doing more than talking and nit picking. if your stride is 90% of your height or better, your front foot comes down in the same place relatively close to a straight line toward your target, you are throwing strikes and training to build arm strength, you aren’t going to break unless your genetics were going to cause you to break anyway.

baseball is not an exact science. get out there and play the game and enjoy it. you can learn some things but most of the stuff you learn after fundamentals will not help you until you reach elite levels of play.[/quote]

Great advice Dusty. While I applaud the dedication of the young pitchers on this site, I feel like we’re creating pitchers to be “too smart.” I’m pretty sure most kids don’t need to know about pronation, especially when they start trying to pronate when they throw. And while hip/shoulder separation is clearly an important part of pitching, trying to feel yourself getting to that position while pitching can be a disaster.

Slightly off topic, but I wanted to address some of the overthinking we can do as pitchers. Chuck it hard, get it into the strike zone and go from there.