Pronation: When to do it?


#1

My question for the community deals with pronation of the arm. I hear that pronation is natural in the throwing motion and serves to protect the elbow and slow the arm down. I’d like to know when is the proper time to pronate and can you teach it? I’ve seen pitchers on my team that seem to pronate at release. The resulting ball flight is like a screwball. I don’t believe they realize they are throwing a pitch which turns out to have more sidespin than backspin (high speed video shows this even with 4-seam fastball grip). For ultimate fastball velocity and control I would think that one should pronate just after elbow extension and ball release which allows force to be applied directly behind the ball and toward home plate.

Comments?


#2

Pronation…supination…sticking it in the microwave for eight minutes…I wouldn’t worry about it. If this is something that happens naturally, there is really no need to think about when to do it. When I was pitching, many moons ago, I never had to think about these things—I would just grip the ball in different ways, depending on the pitch, and I threw it with a fastball (or curveball) motion, with variations (such as for the slider), and no problem. The pitch did what I wanted it to do, which was get the batters out. :slight_smile:


#3

Pronation is a complete “non-teach”… it happens naturally during the delivery. Here’s a pic of my son that shows pronation occurring - he has never been taught it, doesn’t try to do it - it just happens.


#4

"For ultimate fastball velocity and control I would think that one should pronate just after elbow extension and ball release which allows force to be applied directly behind the ball and toward home plate. "

------------Perfectly correct, pmt3, and as structuredoc suggests, your body already “knows” that your forearm/wrist/hand must pronate after the release of every pitch.

You can get a screwball or a quality change-up by pre-setting your forearm/wrist/hand with an appropriate amount of pronation; however, fastballs are released palm-forward (that is, neither pronated nor supinated at release) and then your forearm/etc will naturally go into pronation after ball release as per structuredoc’s excellent photo.


#5

Thank you all for your insight and great photo structuredoc. You say pronation is a complete “non-teach”… it happens naturally during the delivery. But what about someone who pronates unnaturally…tries to pronate at release instead of allowing it to happen naturally. I have a pitcher on my team that, based on high speed video, pronates at release (palm faces third base) when he throws his fastball. I think this is a conscious effort to “stay on top” of the ball. Consequently he’s lost velocity and control and the ball comes out with more sidespin than backspin. He usually misses high (I think because he can’t release out front because of early pronation).

Any suggestions on how to break this habit?


#6

pmt,

It sounds like your pitcher is pronating prior to release so your pitcher is losing velocity because he is essentially throwing a change-up. He may be using a fastball grip but the pronated, palm-out position is what creates the change-up. He needs a change-up so I wouldn’t abandon that - just add a fastball in. Draw a black line around the center of a ball and have him practice throwing it and keeping the line from wobbling.

Now, to improve his control of his change-up, start by checking his grip to make sure his thumb and middle finger cut the ball in half.


#7

[quote=“Roger”]pmt,

Draw a black line around the center of a ball and have him practice throwing it and keeping the line from wobbling.
.[/quote]

I can attest that this works…this was my son throwing when he was 8. I posted this before and JD called it a “a diabolical Marshallite mind meld thingy deal” LOL.

We have done the line on ball drill a lot over the last couple of years. He still pronates a little early on occasion, but he has gotten a lot better. (I cant find any video of him just throwing recently, or i’d make a comparison gif)

I have found that electrical tape works better than actually drawing on the baseball. No ink on your fingers that way :slight_smile:


#8

pronation happens every pitch after the ball is released. especially on major leaguers cuz they are throwing the ball with so much force. but pitchs like the palmball are pronated