Pronating the forearm during the follow through

Should I be pronating the forearm during the follow through?

The arm will automatically do this so you shouldn’t have to be thinking about it or actively trying to do it.

Let me add that there is a growing number of people out there advocating for early pronation as an element that lessens stress, particularly on the elbow. Something in me says that this may have some merit. Roger’s right about the follow through, though. It does happen naturally. The question is whether or not early pronation does what it’s being touted as achieving re: stress reduction.

I’ve always heard doing pitches which require a large amount of pronation (screwball) are really bad for your shoulder, may be wrong though, because mike marshall did throw one.

Since your hand does/should already pronate naturally after release, I think the better question is “Should I keep my forearm pronated during follow-through”?

Yea, I was looking up Dice-K and his gyroball and he pronates his forearm really early.

When I started focusing on the follow through for same reason, I’ve been shortarming the ball somewhat like Rich Harden. I am gonna pronate the arm a little after I release it and try to reach out. I noticed that Nolan Ryan does that.

Are you talking about short-arming your follow through? What issue are you trying to solve?

Yeah, I short arm it.

i’ve never worked with a player who short armmed to the degree that it was a problem. what most people call short armming is really prety good arm motion. i se many more guys getting too long in the back which causes problems.

Yeah, I pretty much stop my arm.

There’s no solid evidence the screwball is a dangerous pitch, and lots of evidence that it’s a good pitch to throw.

Greg Maddux’s FB and CH are modified screwballs. Paul Byrd also throws a screwball.

Stopping your arm is different than short-arming. The only time I’ve concerned myself with a pitcher’s follow-through is when it is abbreviated as that puts more stress on the decellerators. So, if you’re truly stopping your follow-through short then you should indeed work on letting it go its full course. But I don’t think you need to be doing things like trying to pronate or otherwise alter the arm. The arm will take care of itself with respect to those things.

I don’t necessarily believe this is true. While all pitchers pronate after the release point, it takes conscious effort to pronate through the release point, which is how you move the load from the UCL to the pronator teres.

Supinating the wrist early to allow for pronation before and through the release point is something that Roger Clemens does and proves that it can be done consciously.

I don’t necessarily believe this is true. While all pitchers pronate after the release point, it takes conscious effort to pronate through the release point, which is how you move the load from the UCL to the pronator teres.[/quote]
You’re taking my comments out of context. The original post asked only about the follow through part of the delivery. That’s what I spoke to. Early pronation is a separate issue.

I don’t necessarily believe this is true. While all pitchers pronate after the release point, it takes conscious effort to pronate through the release point, which is how you move the load from the UCL to the pronator teres.[/quote]
You’re taking my comments out of context. The original post asked only about the follow through part of the delivery. That’s what I spoke to. Early pronation is a separate issue.[/quote]

Ah, I see. Sorry about that, I didn’t do it intentionally.

No problem. :high5: