Products to help increase velocity

what products have people used to help them gain velocity?
whether its a book/manual, bands, ANYTHING.
i already have tuffcuff and don’t really follow it.

I think since this is Steven’s site then many will say…“Start following Tuff Cuff”, that’s a good start!

TUFFCUFF … is the standard bearer by which all others are measured.

I think after reading …"i already have tuffcuff and don’t really follow it,"
that your looking for something to “strap on” and wall-la!!! Instant whatever…

TUFFCUFF is designed to get you there by doing all the right things, in order, and being there with you every step of the way. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, or go it alone. Yea, it’s work, it’s no walk in the park.

I have no interest in the marketing or the publishing business with respect to this publication. But, I have years worth of three ring binders, notebooks, and 16MM film that fills my den, and then some. This publication compresses all that between the pages of pictures and narration. You can’t go wrong!

I like the section about nutrition the best - THEE MOST NEGLECTED PART OF YOUTH BASEBALL AND PROGRESSION INTO COLLEGE AND THE PROFESSIONAL GAME.

There are all kinds of programs, equipment, pills and stuff in a bottle that’ll take your money and leave with promises. TUFFCUFF doesn’t promise you anything … it’s you that must promise yourself to use.

Got a problem with motivation? Got a problem with a chapter or section?
Ask away!!! I’m no stranger to these methods and disciplines, and either is Steven and a host of others on this site . ASK AWAY… we’ll help you stay on track and be your own best advocate.

Coach B.

i do follow it, just with a good number of modifications. i just have a few issues with tough cuff. NO DOUBT ITS GOOD. but here they are:

  1. the core exercises. it has you pick some exercises and do them for 25 reps each. it’s not too challenging and 25 reps isn’t going to build much strength. i would think adding ankle weights or a heavy med ball with 3 sets of 10 would be much for benficial.
    2)it has few exercises to help with fast twitch. (few plyos/sprints/medball) i personally think the plyo exercises will help much more.
    3)the push to pull ratio is 1to1
    4)some workouts start with smaller muscles and built to compound lifts. why do we do bicep curls before lat pulldowns?

but i do work hard 5-6 days a week. just looking for options. i modified it with my pitching coach. i highly respect what steven has done and would like to applaud him. :clapping:
please reply to this! i do not have a bunch of knowledge in this area and am basically restating what my pitching instructor said :confused:

Let me tell you about THE SECRET.
This is something I learned many moons ago, when I was getting into serious pitching. It started when I was going to games at Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark). I would sit in the upper deck behind the plate where I could get a panoramic view of the whole field, and I would watch the pitchers—during practice, during warmups and in games. I noticed that the Yankees’ Big Three rotation—Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi and Ed Lopat—were all doing the same thing: they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were getting the power behind their pitches, even Lopat who was no fireballer. The arm was just going along for the ride, and those guys were throwing harder—and faster—with less effort. (How not to get a sore arm, or a sore elbow, or a sore shoulder, or a sore anything else.)
I watched them, and I saw just how they were doing this.
I made a note of it and started working on this on my own. As I practiced this essential—and believe me, it is essential—element of good mechanics, I found myself doing the same thing. I was no fireballer either—in fact, I had gone in the other direction—but I found that I was also throwing harder and faster with less effort, and being a natural sidearmer I discovered that my delivery had more snap and sizzle to it just because I was doing it with less effort.
There are some exercises that can be found on this website, such as the “Hershiser drill” which aims at getting the hips fully involved, and you would do well to make use of them. Maybe you won’t get to 100 miles an hour like Feller or Reynolds did, but you can certainly pick up some speed.
And that, dear reader, is THE SECRET. Sure, it takes effort, but it will pay off big time. 8) :baseballpitcher:

For some reason, I missed the part where you have a pitching coach.(?)

So, I’m not going to advise you from one side - then have someone else advising you from the other side. That would only catch you in the middle and that’s not right. Besides, coaches really don’t, and won’t, step into or cross the line into another coach’s work. It’s not professional nor does it serve any purpose.

Your current pitching coach has reasons for what you’re doing, and he/she is witness to a lot more personal detail then I, or anyone else for that matter.

Coach B.

By the way, I’d like to ask :

how old are you?
what level of competition are you at? (Little League/High School/ College.)

[quote=“Zita Carno”]Let me tell you about THE SECRET.
This is something I learned many moons ago, when I was getting into serious pitching. It started when I was going to games at Yankee Stadium (the original ballpark). I would sit in the upper deck behind the plate where I could get a panoramic view of the whole field, and I would watch the pitchers—during practice, during warmups and in games. I noticed that the Yankees’ Big Three rotation—Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi and Ed Lopat—were all doing the same thing: they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were getting the power behind their pitches, even Lopat who was no fireballer. The arm was just going along for the ride, and those guys were throwing harder—and faster—with less effort. (How not to get a sore arm, or a sore elbow, or a sore shoulder, or a sore anything else.)
I watched them, and I saw just how they were doing this.
I made a note of it and started working on this on my own. As I practiced this essential—and believe me, it is essential—element of good mechanics, I found myself doing the same thing. I was no fireballer either—in fact, I had gone in the other direction—but I found that I was also throwing harder and faster with less effort, and being a natural sidearmer I discovered that my delivery had more snap and sizzle to it just because I was doing it with less effort.
There are some exercises that can be found on this website, such as the “Hershiser drill” which aims at getting the hips fully involved, and you would do well to make use of them. Maybe you won’t get to 100 miles an hour like Feller or Reynolds did, but you can certainly pick up some speed.
And that, dear reader, is THE SECRET. Sure, it takes effort, but it will pay off big time. 8) :baseballpitcher:[/quote]

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=5661690

I think Aroldis Chapman does the same thing. Whats the Hershiser drill I can’t find it on the site.

i am 17. a junior in high school. i play for my varsity high school team(two seasons left before college) and the legion varsity team (two seasons before i enter college)

Johnny Cello:

Here’s the Hershiser drill, demo’ed by Tom House:

It’s a good thing Chapman did the hershiser drill otherwise he would probably only be throwing 80.

How hard do you throw right now?? I am guessing you are a RHP?

I do have some clips you can check out on youtube if you like…the link is below in my signature…may help spark some questions, ideas…

I have not read Steven’s tuffcuff book so I could not reply in that regard…

This is every young pitchers biggest question…so many different ideas on how to do this…you must start to learn about your craft if you want to be able to get info that works for you…too many people telling you a bunch of different things will not help…

Start checking out the hardest throwers in the game…watch their film and then watch yours…start to take ownership and learn…it would be the best advice I could give you for right now…

i’m a RHP. topping in the low 80’s. and sitting 78-80 this offseason. i want to put on 5-7 mph atleast in the next 6 months or so. it’s gonna be tough!

[quote=“rawlingsguy1”]what products have people used to help them gain velocity?
whether its a book/manual, bands, ANYTHING.
i already have tuffcuff and don’t really follow it.[/quote]

I’ve heard that Mr. Elllis’ Tuffcuff is good.
Recently, I just got the Pitching Academy’s Pitching Mechanics DVD.
Remember,
gaining velocity is the result of using the hips and lower body to produce a pitcher’s power.
Hip rotation and delayed shoulder rotation are keys to gaining velocity.
Lower body strength and core strength are important.
A pitcher’s power comes from his lower body,
and that’s where most of his strength should be concentrated.

best products are a bucket of good baseballs, a net to throw into (i use the atec catch net), and a reasonably efficient throwing motion. then get to work. throw 5-6 days per week using a progressive throwing schedule like the tuffcuff throwing schedules.

it’s simple, but not easy. if it ws easy there would be many more good pitchers

What’s even better than a net to throw into is a good catcher. What I used to do as a little snip and then later on: I’d get a catcher, and he would set up behind the plate with a mitt and a mask, and we would play a game we called “ball and strike”, wherein he would position his mitt in various places, high, low, inside, outside, every which way but standing on his head :lol: , and I would work on my control—getting the ball smack-dab into the pocket of the mitt—what a satisfying feeling, to hear that “Thwack” as the ball hit its target! I can’t think of a better way to get that location thing squared away. And from time to time we would get someone to stand in the batter’s box, on either side, so I could really zero in on the strike zone (which, back in the day, was larger than it is now). Great fun and a tremendous workout. :slight_smile: 8)