Preseason conditioning

Several of my friends who play at DII colleges say they have pitchers doing mainly running for preseason conditioning. We are using a program from ron wolforth called The Athletic Pitcher (www.theathleticpitcher.com) are there many other colleges who use programs like this?

Excellent question.
I’m not sure of the program that you mentioned, but I can comment on the customary exercises and drills, you should be aware of: (I would suggest asking HAMMER what his experiences have been. He can help answer that question more specific based on his experiences.)

Most colleges have specific stipulations related to how – when –and what their student athletes can and can not due – based on the governing body of the athletic association that the institution belongs to. Take for example the NCAA and its rules that spell out how many units a student athlete can practice/compete while enrolled during the year (academic, etc.) The NCAA web site has any excellent section on academic/athletic rules.

More often than not, running is a great way to compliment the “rules” process and still get in shape for the season (preseason or not). In fact, many athletes run regardless of what sport their in – baseball, basketball, etc. Working out in the dorm, hallway, student hall and so forth using workouts that were done during the prime season is not unusual. BUT – WITHOUT THE DIRECTION OF THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT IN ANY WAY. It does skirt the rules some I will admit, even to the point of some students gathering at a spot provided by an alumni or boaster and practicing various exercise routines and even tossing a few… as just a bunch of good ole boys having a little fun. I am not a supporter of those activities regardless of how discretionary or discreet they may appear. I believe that college is for learning how to develop professional skills for your future – in addition to applying the fundamentals of ethical behavior. Kind of ole fashion I know, but that’s me.

Below are my experiences --to address your question directly about conditioning routines:
-First there’s a preseason meeting of the team’s doctor/physician’s assistant/trainer.
-Second there’s a cardiovascular and pulmonary program= running and heart rate monitoring lung capacity enhancement, etc.
-Third there’s a stretching and muscle toning program= floor exercises, isometrics, resistance…
-Fourth there’s intermittent monitoring by trainer and meetings with the coaches if necessary.
-Fifth there’s strength and tolerance enhancement drills, specific to the position.
-Sixth there’s intermittent monitoring by trainer and meetings with the coaches if necessary.
-Seventh there’s pitch specialty phase of re-introduction and familiarization closely monitored by your pitching coach or assistant coaches.

Since every college and university has unique resources at their disposal –some more than others, your experience(s) will vary GREATLY. In fact, imagine being part of this:
The gym and weight room got flooded by the last rain and the only place available to conduct a preseason program will be with the School of Liberal Arts –dance studio. More specifically the ballet practice room… floor to wall mirrors, ballet bar… and let’s not forget those cute little Victoria Blue - Tutu. After twenty minutes the guys just couldn’t concentrate not to mention all the … I’ll call ya latter.

By the way, some institutions include prospects along with returning upper classman and transfer students all mixed together. This environment can be awkward for a rookie, so ask ahead of time if that is the case, and ask how does that program work. It’s important.

Coach B.

I should qualify my statement above with respect to physical conditioning and training,when I said that I do not support these activities regardless how discretionary. When alumni and other supporters outside of the customary collegiate environment, provide training facilities and “shadow” coaching to avoid the protocols of rules application(s), that’s what I was aluding to.

Coach B.

Um, I think the question is just about the quality of training programs, not the ethics of college programs.

Yes, most college programs are based around running and I think that Wolforth’s program is much better than traditional pitcher’s training.

palo20 I have a question for you? My response was:

[color=blue]I’m not sure of the program that you mentioned, but I can comment on the customary exercises and drills,…

Below are my experiences --to address your question directly about conditioning routines:
-First there’s a preseason meeting of the team’s doctor/physician’s assistant/trainer.
-Second there’s a cardiovascular and pulmonary program= running and heart rate monitoring lung capacity enhancement, etc.
-Third there’s a stretching and muscle toning program= floor exercises, isometrics, resistance…
-Fourth there’s intermittent monitoring by trainer and meetings with the coaches if necessary.
-Fifth there’s strength and tolerance enhancement drills, specific to the position.
-Sixth there’s intermittent monitoring by trainer and meetings with the coaches if necessary.
-Seventh there’s pitch specialty phase of re-introduction and familiarization closely monitored by your pitching coach or assistant coaches.

Since every college and university has unique resources at their disposal –some more than others, your experience(s) will vary GREATLY…[/color]

So, …UM… how do you come by your remark.

The additonal information that was provided was guidence on how some programs conduct their conditioning routines … which is just as important as what they do. …Um…
Coach B.

I just thought it was a simple question that needed a simple answer. Using mostly running in a training program is probably not the most efficient way of getting better, though it can definitely help. I think Wolforth’s program is more pitcher specific and therefore more can be gained. There are some college programs that use at least some of his ideas–Vanderbilt being one of them.

Good point – brevity does have its place.

Coach B

  1. Throw, throw, throw, throw, and throw some more. Ofcourse, you have to listen to your arm. But nothing prepares you to pitch, like actually pitching and throwing itself.

  2. A good strength and conditioning program. Include as many of the follwing as possible… and then some…

lifting, stretching, cardio, sprint work, pilates, yoga, core work, cuff work, agilities, possibly other sports, etc.

  1. Quality workouts… Focus.

I have used the program with success with my pitchers at different programs where I have coached. I have generally started the program with them in November and by this time of the year (Jan) we transitition to more of a rotation model getting the pitchers and their pitch counts ready for the start of the season.