"Pointing" curveball?

One of my friends is starting to throw a “pointing” curveball, where you put your middle finger and thumb on the normal seams, but you point your index finger straight up. All you need to focus on is to point at the batter. His dad, a coach, said that it is just a good first step to learning a curveball. What do you think about it?

In some quarters it’s called a “beginner’s curveball”, and for some it could well be a good first step in learning to throw a curve. There are, of course, other ways—you want to find the one that works for you. 8)

I do know of a pitching coach in my area who teaches the pointing, beginners CB. He’s had good success with it as that, a beginners CB.

I do agree with Zita, you have to find what works for you. My son for example went through several grips and settled on the spike grip. That's what worked for him. Thats what he was comfortable throwing. Other kids at the same instructor threw different grips. My point being is that each pitcher is different and the grip has to have a degree of comfort and confidence.
Pointing the finger might be easier, but experiment with other grips and find YOUR grip. One that you can throw with confidence.

There is nothing wrong with learning how to throw a curveball using this method. In fact, I will teach this with some of my pitchers but the most important thing to remember when throwing a curve or any other pitch for that matter is where your wrist and forearm angle are at release of the baseball.

Here is a youtube video that helps explain how to throw an awesome curveball.

Interesting how this guy talks about 2 different types of breaks to throw a curveball. I disagree with his suggestion to turn the ball in to make it easier to throw a breaking pitch, it may be easier but I think it puts quite a bit more stress on the arm to do this. The drop should be the same whatever ;pitch you throw all that should change is release and allignment.

[quote=“The Pitching Academy”]There is nothing wrong with learning how to throw a curveball using this method. In fact, I will teach this with some of my pitchers but the most important thing to remember when throwing a curve or any other pitch for that matter is where your wrist and forearm angle are at release of the baseball.

Here is a youtube video that helps explain how to throw an awesome curveball.

http://tinyurl.com/3hvdl3p[/quote]

Where your arm finishes across your body (with regard to pronation/supination) is absolutely wrong. Look at high speed video of any pitcher from the front. No pitcher finishes with their forearm supinated across their body; the forearm pronates after the release of the baseball in all pitchers.

I didn’t watch much of the rest, but if you got that fact wrong, I have some questions about how much you understand about the mechanics of throwing a baseball.

eric gagne threw his that way even in the majors and had good success with it, josh beckett is an other one that comes to my mind.