Please analyze my mechanics

Below is my first video of me pitching to post on here. I am not throwing a ball because my arm is sore.

You need to be throwing a ball. Otherwise your mechanics are different.

Rest out your arm and post a video where you’re throwing a ball.

the 1st clip was with a ball if you can tell and he opens the shouldes up right before plant and losses all power everything else looks pretty good.

Beside the weird joint angle into the plant it’s like this / angle looks different. Can you see it?

Also I have the raw file of that so i can see more idk if you will be able to but keep the work up.

It looks like your throwing a bit sidearm. Try throwing a little bit more over the top. Probably thats why your arm is sore.

Try stopping the video when your about to throw the ball and you will see what I mean. Try stopping it at the angle that your throwing towards the camera.

Here are 2 things that really stand out:
•Hooking the ball
•Collapsing the front leg

I have to disagree.

When you slow it down frame by frame there is no hooking in the wrist. Also The front leg collasp because FLAT GROUND so you have to dismiss that because it would go away on a mound.

Well, let me start out by saying I used to throw EXACTLY the same as you do (albeit, a higher leg kick).

-From what I’ve learned, you need to slow down a bit. Of course, not your arm, but your wind-up. Lift your leg and make sure you’re set in balance, then push off and let momentum and gravity pull you down onto what would be the mound. Also, when you’re moving that fast, your arm has to move twice as fast b/c it goes behind your back and all the way around. Don’t swing your arm so far back because it has to eventually catch up to your fast-moving body. Then, as you plant your foot, violently snap your glove elbow down to your side (glove in chest) and allow that fast arm you have to start closer to home plate. You throw hard, but you’ll seem faster if you get that power w/ your body and not behind it.

I hope that makes sense. But wow, that is exactly how I used to throw, and since changing the stuff I mentioned above, I’ve never had a sore arm after pitching. Plus, the ball is released farther than it was before and with more power. Good luck,

Lt Dan

DO NOT SLOW DOWN. THat is bad information to give to this pitcher or any pitcher. Balance point reduces MPH by moving fast off the back leg you will create more momentum and mph the only thing he needs to work on is momentum and staying closed everything else is fine.

The best pitchers do not have a balance point were they stop and gain balance. Nolan ryan didn’t and randy jonshon just to name to didn’t do that.

[quote=“RIstar”]DO NOT SLOW DOWN. THat is bad information to give to this pitcher or any pitcher. Balance point reduces MPH by moving fast off the back leg you will create more momentum and mph the only thing he needs to work on is momentum and staying closed everything else is fine.

The best pitchers do not have a balance point were they stop and gain balance. Nolan ryan didn’t and randy jonshon just to name to didn’t do that.[/quote]

Okay first of all, you can still push off fast…just after a leg kick. You’re basically describing a high slide step move from the wind-up which is ridiculous. And how can you say “he needs to work on his momentum” what the heck are you talking about? HE HAS NO BALANCE!!! Start off with a balanced position, and then push off the mound to get momentum. How do you expect to finish your pitch balanced, if you don’t start off balanced? It doesn’t have to be a 2 second balance position, just get your self in position to fall toward the target and let go!

Ok h/o what im talking about is the way nolan ryan and the great MLB pitchers have done it. You lift and Drive at the same time you do not stay over your back leg long. And it’s not a push affect off the mound it’s a pull affect from the moving when you lift the leg. Most mlb pitchers do this.

To RIstar:

Seriously, shut up about major league players…no one here has the same body or mechanics as them, so we can’t base our knowledge of baseball on what we see on TV.

Second of all, read your posts on the video of yourself. You will find a unanimous agreement that you have weird mechanics (which include mechanics that are too fast, and an arm that has to catch up, possibly resulting in injury). And if your principles of pitching are seen from a TV, then you obviously are not a visual learner. Like I said, we do not have the same bodies as them, and we are not as strong/experienced/well-practiced and trained as them, so we won’t all throw the same.

If you really want to look at some MLB players with a balance position look at:
Ted Lilly
Johan Santana (not as prolonged as Mr. Lilly)
Dan Haren
Javier Vasquez
Greg Maddux
…to name a few.

Here’s your video topic:
http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=3856&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

1st off if you look at Frame by frame of all the pitcher you just said johan santana moves sideway’s while lifting leg and so does Greg, Ted Lily and javior the only one with a balance point is Dan haren.

I bet Roger and Dm will agree that a balance point will slow down Momentum. Momentum is created by moving sideway’s while lifting the leg up. It is as simple as that. Everyone on the site will agree with that. You do not want to stop or hesitate one bit instead you want to lift and drive at the same time.

Look at nolan ryan and most mlb pitchers they do it. They do not have a balance position or a pause. Right before they reach peak leg lift they are moving sideway’s.

Also If you are talking about my mechanics from before then you are mis informed that i’ve changed them. And now throw alot harder. That video is from along time ago and now that i’ve fised posture everything is fine. Nice try with the personal attack on me.

I’m not personally attacking you, but you’re not helping the topic creator at all. Look at this footage of myself:

I get height by standing up straight and finding my balance. I gradually move forward and bring the leg down, right into place, and let go (a little earlier than I would like on that spec. pitch). I let my arm stay with my body, and as I move my hips I bring my arm with, letting the ball gain momentum along with me, and then I use the strength of my arm to throw the ball thereafter. I’m not gonna throw any faster if I push off while I bring my leg up, and there’s gonna be no pop on the ball.

Also, show me the frame by frame view of Johan and yourself that you used to determine your statement. One, I’d really like to have the Johan one, and two, I want to see how fast you throw, just because that was “old video”.

You lift then drive most mlb pitcher do not do that they lift and drive at the same time I’m going to show a couple clips to show you the correct way. You don’t gain really good momentum with all the body and look like throwing with mostly arm.

Nolan Ryan {Third clip you see under the 1st one ok}
http://www.pitchingclips.com/players/nolan_ryan.htm

You will see that he is driving forward and lifting his leg so he is striding when he reaches peak leg lift. Also Look at the bottom with tim lincecum where he and lincecum are lifting and driving at same time.

Randy Johnson look at the 1st video {look how he lifts and drives at same time}
http://www.pitchingclips.com/players/randy_johnson.htm

Mariano Rivera look at when he peaks leg lift he is already started to move sideway’s. This is the right way.

http://www.pitchingclips.com/players/mariano_rivera.htm

In all of the clips they do not find there balance instead they Lift and Drive/Drift at the same time. Do you understand now?

Just got a radar gun it’s about 70-75 mph ok and I’m 15 years old so 80 by next year.

No. Show me your new video.

Oh, and don’t put the radar gun 10 feet away from you.

lol if this is about me then you need to stop.

I don’t have video but will be getting one in the future. Please look at the videos I have instructed did you see how they lift and drive at the same time?

No i bought a radar gun and use it the right way please look at the videos please.