Playing the Percentages


#1

In this game there are tendencies that can go completely unnoticed, and one of those tendencies is "playing the percentages."
What?
What I mean is, if there is a high probability of something happening or not, that happening you should take note of and either go with it, or not.
For example - lets say that your pitching to the eight batter in the lineup and his last at bat wasn’t exactly a stellar one. He stood in the box, bat on shoulder, swung the bat at everything… one…two…three, he struck himself out. Ok… now he’s up again and you should take note of his last attempt, and deal with this guy easily. Don’t over pitch this one, don’t get fancy, just sail your best stuff down range and that’s-that.
As simple as this may sound, in real time it works just that simple.
Another example - you’re starting tomorrow, and from past experiences your coaches will send in signal after signal for you to pitch. And like so many other games, you take the field and have no idea of what you’re going with, signal after signal from the catcher. Sound familiar? So, if your locations aren’t there for anything inside, or your breaking pitch is virtually none existent that day, I’d say that you have a high percentage of being knocked around pretty hard. Again, sound familiar?
Another example - you’ve pitched three days ago by being pulled from the field and given your allotted warm ups. Now the same thing is happening for todays game. Again you take the hill, your arm is sore, especially in the elbow, and the rest of your appearance goes down hill from there. Sound familiar?
All of what I just mentioned are typical situations in the amateur game - but being noticed and taking some kind of action is usually ignored. I could go on with other examples, but that would avoid the main topic of this posting.
When you see something or experience something that happens more often than not, keep a notebook of these experiences and refer to those experiences as your memory bank. A bank of how to, and when to, react and plan for your next attendance. Share those experiences with your parents, talk about them, lend an ear to suggestions and comments - learn, learn, learn.
Those experiences in this game that are on the plus side - keep and use over and over again. Those experiences on the negative side may be unavoidable, buy you should plan for dealing with those negative experiences in a positive what to lessen their impact on you.
By the way, watch a Major League game and listen to the commentator narrate the frequencies of any at bat. He’ll usually give some statistics like the batter’s batting average, slugging percentage, what he did his last time in the box, and so on. In essence, the commentator is telling you how this batter has done historically. On the other side of the field, the other team’s bench has the same basic information and has determined how the battery should play the percentages when facing said batter.
Coach B


#2

[quote=“Coach_Baker, post:1, topic:19919”]Another example - you’ve pitched three days ago by being pulled from the field and given your allotted warm ups. Now the same thing is happening for todays game. Again you take the hill, your arm is sore, especially in the elbow, and the rest of your appearance goes down hill from there. Sound familiar?[/quote]Yes. This is a pet peeve of mine. No MLB manager in his right mind would put a fully developed pitcher on the mound without a full warmup session. Why would a youth or high school coach do it to a kid?