Planks

Anyone heard of these exercises (i think its planks)? You act like you’re doing a pushup, but with your forearms on the ground, and instead of pushing up and coming back down, you push up and hold. They’re are supposed to help the core. Are they dangerous? Because my first time doing planks (walking planks, planks, sideplanks), my abs really never got sore, but rather my lower back.

Great workout for pitchers.

You gotta make sure your hips don’t collapse. That puts most of the weight of pressure on the lower back. When doing them to failure, stop when you can no longer keep your hips up. (So I’ve read)

Those are really good for you, but my lower back gets sore as well. Most of the time I drop because of my back, not my abs.

What’s wrong with your lower back getting sore?? It’s apart of your core also.

Planks are isometric - isometric exercises are generally safe because there is no movement.

The NPA includes planks in their dynamic warm-ups as a way to incorporate some strength work into the warm-ups they teach.

Planks are a great core exercise, I usually do them until failure, but I stop when I can’t keep my body straight anymore.

Try bridges to, very similar but you prop yourself up on your side.

planks are not a magical exercise. However they can be beneficial. Supplement your ab routine with them, or use them as a finisher. Eventually you should be able to hold a perfect plank for a few minutes.

I just hit a 3 minute plank with relative ease.

Yeah in 4 months of planks I have went from 45 seconds to over 5 minutes.
Definitely the shoulders more than back or abs.

any exercise that makes your lower back unusually sore is a very suspect exercise. you must protect your lower back. there are limits to what it can handle, then you are hurting yourself. they found this out in the 1920’s when the guys who picked up the wheel assemblies for model a’s and rotated with the weight kept breaking down. no matter how long they did the exercise (and they had to do this) the lower back could not compensate.

roman chair sit ups, and bending forward over a roman chair machine holding a 45 lb plate then rising up and rotating are an almost guaranteed trip to the back surgeon. your back was not made to do that.

be careful. there are lots of well meaning trainers and meatheads running around gyms that do not know what they are doing from a spinal standpoint. if your back goes down, it is a tough miserable road to throw again. randy johnson has back problems and it’s tough (but it can be done). you must think health before strength.

Check out these planks

it only puts pressure on your lower back if your abs aren’t strong enough to hold you up. Keep them tensed up throughout the entire exercise.

Many folks don’t understand that the lower spine is designed for flexion/extension only while the upper spine is designed to allow some rotation. This fits in with the NPA’s stability/mobility model. You need to train for stability those parts of the body that provide stability and for mobility those parts that provide mobility. Applying the wrong training to a certain part of the body is a risk.

[quote]roman chair sit ups, and bending forward over a roman chair machine holding a 45 lb plate then rising up and rotating are an almost guaranteed trip to the back surgeon. your back was not made to do that.
be careful. there are lots of well meaning trainers and meatheads running around gyms that do not know what they are doing from a spinal standpoint. if your back goes down, it is a tough miserable road to throw again. randy johnson has back problems and it’s tough (but it can be done).[/quote]
My understanding is that the Yankees had Johnson doing rotational things on the low back. :shock:

That is what the NPA’s Foundation Fitness program is all about. It focuses on building a basic foundation of fitness by identifying and fixing the weak links in the body. And that provides a balanced foundation upon which to develop sport-specific strength and flexibility.