Pitching Velocity one year


#1

Is it possible to go from 75 MPH to 90 MPH in ONE YEAR?


#2

So many variables to consider:
-age of pitcher
-previously trained or untrained
-mechanics
-health
-previous injuries
-body size/mass
-what resources are available physically and financially to support


#3

18 year old. Trained all life. Fundamental mechanics. No injury problems. Plenty of money for support. 175 lbs. Great health.


#4

It is possible but it depends. Check into the Velocity+ Arm Care program. Should be able to get you some improvement.


#5

I think there are some other questions to address…
Are you talking about being able to throw at 90 or are you talking about pitching.
If you are 18 years old (not a child) and 175 lbs (not a tiny guy) and have an extensive training history, the first question is why are you only throwing 75 mph now?
Is there a fundamental movement limitation that is holding you back?


#6

For pitching. And well, I’m not sure. My mechanics are good, there could be a problem that needs to be fixed though. Maybe if I post a video you guys could help.


#7

#8

You have a few glaring issues:

  1. You are an “up, down, and out” pitcher - in other words, you get virtually no early momentum with your body; you lift up your leg, you put it down, and you stride out, rather than projecting and gliding your hips toward the target.

  2. You are a long-armed, “pie-throwing” pitcher - you move your arm straight back toward second base and you throw from this “long” and stiff position; you don’t get much bend in your throwing arm, and you never get close to maximal external rotation. Basically, there is no whip in your arm.

  3. Since this is a slow-motion clip, it is not possible to determine your speed of movement (intent) toward the plate. Usually, the faster one moves down the mound, the harder one throws.


#9

I agree with everything structuredoc said.
The lack of external rotation is glaring. If you are not able to achieve that forearm layback it will be tough to create whip.
I also agree that most “up, down and out” pitchers usually are not pitching with great intent.


#10

You give great points. But how can I fix these issues? You give me nothing but lack of motivation. I need to fix it.


#11

As far as fixing these issues:

  1. Practice moving forward toward the plate with your hips as soon as you lift your leg. Be sure to keep your upper body trailing behind your front hip though. I like to think of keeping my head over my back hip as I move forward.

  2. Arm action is tougher to change; my suggestion would be to practice taking the ball out of the glove with your fingers on top of the ball and with bent elbows. Continue to raise your arms up from the elbows (imagine you are a puppet and someone is pulling the strings attached to your elbows straight up. As they are moving up, feel the squeeze of your shoulder blades. Then, as fast as you can, try to put the ball directly behind your head (even better, between your shoulder blades) and throw.


#12

Structuredoc has given a couple of good tips to help with some of the issues.
Asking about adding 15MPH of velo in a relatively short time is asking to do something most guys are never able to do. I am not saying that to discourage you, just the opposite. I don’t know if you can pitch 90, no one does really, but letting answers saying there is work to be done effect motivation is concerning. The bad news and the good news is the same…there is work to do. But there has to be a realistic approach. Set smaller goals on the road to major change. Maximizing conditioning, getting on a structured throwing program, implementing mechanical changes ect. Motivation with such a goal can only come from within oneself.