Pitching velo 15u


#1

Im 15 freshman in highschool (just turned 15). Im almost 5’5” and about it 118lbs or so. The fastest ive been clocked at off the mound was 68 but i had pitched like 4 innings a couple hours before. The hardest ive thrown in a running throw is 73. Im a late bloomer as well. Is this velo good or do i need to pick it up a notch. Heres a vid of me pitching if you see anything i should work on https://youtu.be/36D3KH13SVE


#2

68 may or may not be your top speed it really just depends on how you recover. Why were you getting clocked after you just pitched? You should be resting and not throwing. That’s how you get hurt.


#3

Youre right. it was the last game of the season and i just wanted to see how hard i throw. I threw maybe 10 pitches. Do you have any insight on my question? Thanks!


#4

The velo is fine for your size. When you say you are a late bloomer, how so? How big are your parents? How big do you expect to be? Size isn’t everything but it helps.

As for the video, the way you recoil back after release would be something to work on. It almost looks forced. Try to be more fluid on the follow through and allow your arm more time/distance to deaccelerate.


#5

My parents are both 5’10” but im supposed to be 6’1”. I have really “developed” like other kids yet lol. As for the recoil thing, that mostly only happens when i throw as hard as i can but i will work on it. The first pitch in the video i had less recoil. Thanks for the insight


#6

68 for a freshman is probably about average. That’s about what I was throwing last year and I didn’t make my high school team that time, but at a lot of other schools I probably would’ve.(I go to a powerhouse in florida so it’s tough) My advice is to never be satisfied where you’re at velocity-wise and always aim to get better. I was pretty much your exact size last year(one inch taller and same weight), the best thing for us short guys is to build up our strength foundation because we’re not going to gain much from growing. Get your legs and core stronger and you will see gains. Good luck my dude, and go red sox lol.


#7

Awesome thanks man, go sox!


#8

Isaac,

Your overall pitching mechanics are pretty solid. However, there are a few things I would absolutely clean up. The first phase of the pitching delivery is called Early Momentum. Keys to this move include 1. Early Weight Shift while getting gathered and loaded. This is hard for you to do because in your first movement (early momentum), you shift your weight back while turning your body. You also move your glove arm too far away from your body and off the center line of your chest.

  1. Leading With the Hips is the next key with Early Momentum. Momentum towards home plate before hand break is not a must, but a good rule of thumb. Because of the lack of early momentum, it makes it difficult for you to sit into your delivery and move away from the pitching rubber. 3. Work on being more stable and engaged with the back leg. See how Corey Oswalt sits into his delivery at about the same point in your delivery. See pics below for 2 and 3. Also notice his entire core is inside of the drive leg. A sure sign that a pitcher is moving his core down the mound.

LTP%20Isaac%20Sitting%20into%20deliveryCorey%20Oswalt

  1. The center of gravity and your hips do lead the action. Nicely done.
    LTP%20Isaac%20Center%20of%20Gravity

My suggestion to you would be to keep your arms closer to your body on leg lift (Verlander pic). Prior to early momentum, don’t swing your arms and your body back before going forward. Finally, use your entire core to move down the mound. I believe if you can work on some of these movements, you may be able to find some hidden velocity you are leaving on the table.

Hope this helps.

Steve


#9

Thanks so much! This was very helpful i will work on all of this!


#10

Velocity is huge advantage, probably the ruler by which most kids are measured with. Strength and mechanics are the major keys to unlocking more velocity, outside of getting taller.
However. Don’t forget you are trying to be pitcher, not a thrower. Location, speed change, pitch disguise, and knowing what a hitter is looking for, will take you further than just throwing hard. My 11 year old is hitting 73 from 50 feet, and still will get hit if he misses his spot to the wrong kid.


#11

Thanks, do you have any advice for me concerning my question


#12

Yes, get with a personal trainer to gain strength through a lifting program. And, don’t be blinded by velocity. Try to become a complete pitcher.