Pitching too slow


#1

This baseball season is almost over. We had regular season then a babe ruth team, and now me and my friend Drew are in a 13 year old babe ruth league. In the regular season i pitched about 4 games. I had no problem pitching strikes. Out of the entire tam i was the most accurate, but my velocity is not the best. I pitch maybe 60…maybe. Is there anything i shuld know to increase my velocity?


#2

60 at 13 is pretty good.

I wouldn’t focus on upping your velocity if you don’t need it (and it sounds like you don’t).

You will pick up velocity as you get older and stronger.


#3

60 at 13 is pretty good.

I wouldn’t focus on upping your velocity if you don’t need it (and it sounds like you don’t).

You will pick up velocity as you get older and stronger.[/quote]

The human body is extremely goal oriented in it’s motor learning process. If it is not your goal to throw hard, it won’t ‘just happen as you get older’.

That’s like saying I want to improve my 60 yard dash time but never run sprints or train to get faster.

You can and must train to throw harder if your goal is to maximize your throwing capabilities. You should do it in a way that mimizes injury risks, but to say you shouldn’t do it at all is not true, IMO.


#4

So you’re saying as the kid get older and his body developes he wont throw harder? thats bull crap. As you get old you’re able to naturally throw harder most of the time. Im not saying to stop working out or stop mstaying in shape.Im just saying that when you tell someone that as there body matures they wont throw harder you’re wrong.


#5

i dont get this

if your 13 and thorw 60 thats great

too slow

im 15 thorw 65

and people cant hit me


#6

put more leg into it :!: man your velocity is fine playin at short behind u i can tell u its fine


#7

No, what I’m saying is that if you don’t try to develop/maximize velocity, you won’t throw to the maximum of your capabilities(ie: it doesn’t just come with age). You will throw with more velocity with age, but you won’t maximize your capabilites if you don’t train to do so. To do something well, throw hard, run fast, run long distances, lift heavy weights, you have to train and push your body with that goal in mind. If you want to bench press 300 lbs, you have to push your body to it limits to reach that goal. If you want to run a mile in 4 minutes, you have to train your body to do that(interval training, 2-3 mile runs at about a 5 min pace, etc.). It is the same thing with pitching/throwing. If throwing hard(ie: eventual 90 MPH) is something you wish to achieve, you have to train/push your body/arm to reach that goal. If just getting older was enough to throw hard, why even play ball at all until you get older? If you don’t have the goal/intent to do something, most likely it won’t happen.


#8

Who cares, if you’re striking guys out (and trying to throw harder than necessary may lead to problems)?


#9

Who cares, if you’re striking guys out (and trying to throw harder than necessary may lead to problems)?[/quote]

Who cares? Pro scouts, college coaches, most people involved with baseball at a high level. Read Nolan Ryan’s book about how he learned to throw by throwing absolutely as hard as he could at a 12-inch circle he had painted on a barn wall at his parent’s farm. Could he have possibly hurt his arm in the process? Sure. But I’ll bet if you asked him was it worth the trouble he’d tell you a resounding yes. Research how many pitchers get drafted each year that can’t hit 90. It’s a low pct. Bottom line is the better your arm is, the more likely you are to play at a high level(beyond high school). I guess it boils down to what your goal is. There are pitcher who don’t throw 90 and are successful, but they are the exception, and many of them have arm troubles as well. There are also many that do throw 90 and above that have had long relatively healthy careers(Ryan, Clemens, etc.)