Pitching to a Plate Crowder

What is he as a batter trying to make you do?
He wants you as the pitcher to be uncomfortable, when he gets you to that spot, he’s won…For a cruddy hitter, in his experience has made him get on base with walks and or HBP, for an experienced hitter he’s getting you to go where he wants…neither is good for you…which is why I’m with Steven, take back the plate and endevor to make him the uncomfortable one.

I would try throwing a curveball that starts at his body but breaks towards the inside or middle of the plate. So that if he turns his back its a called strike or if he stays in it is still hard to hit.

Well guys, you made me sign in and comment on this topic. I respectfully disagree with some of the things mentioned in this thread. Here’s my opinion, which is based solely off where a hitter stands EVERYTIME he steps into the box, not per say if he’s cheating on a pitch.

When a hitter steps into the box and he is close to the plate (every plate appearance), you have to understand why as a hitter he stands so close. The reason is simple, because he likes the ball close to him. One time or another in his career he decided that he had to move on top of the plate because he doesn’t like the ball away from him. For me personally, I would attack this type of hitter with pitches away from him. Ofcourse that’s not to say you can’t go in, but I’d be more likely to go hard in off the plate and make my money away.

The opposite is true for hitters who stand off the plate. These are generally speaking guys who are big and strong who like to get extended. These guys are off the plate because they don’t like the ball in on their hands, they want to get extended and drive the baseball. Pedroia (sp?) is an example. Even though he’s not a big guy, he steps in the bucket and is a little off the plate. He has a long swing and hooks the ball and drives the ball away from him. He’s more of an out inside.

Take barry bonds for example. The guy was right on the plate, and by George I can’t remember anybody jamming that guy. Not that he couldn’t necessarily hit the ball away, but he did the vast majority of his damage with balls closer to his body.

I just don’t see you giving in to a hitter Hammer, most folks ain’t Barry Bonds, maybe you’d have to modify the approach on a Bonds, Pujols type monster, but your personna over the past couple of years would lead me to think that the ear hole of the helmet would be your target…until the message came across and then whatever…jmo

The way a hitter stands in the box often tells you what they like and what they are uncomfortable with … make them very uncomfortable . Now I confess, I was not a power pitcher…but because of that I had to focus even more on keeping guys from diving into the zone. Many guys referred to me as a headhunter, which I took as a compliment … the fact that they were aware of my obsession for pitching inside kept them honest. Remember, the goal is absolutely positively NOT to hit them…however, never be afraid to get it pretty close !

I faced a batter a few games ago, that literally had his toes ON the edge of the plate. That, and he was also leaning over. Now, I am a house league pitcher, so, I am not going to rely on my control to spin his cap. All I did, was throw him three straight curves, that started behind his head and came into the zone, strike three, batters out.

[quote=“Hammer”]Well guys, you made me sign in and comment on this topic. I respectfully disagree with some of the things mentioned in this thread. Here’s my opinion, which is based solely off where a hitter stands EVERYTIME he steps into the box, not per say if he’s cheating on a pitch.

When a hitter steps into the box and he is close to the plate (every plate appearance), you have to understand why as a hitter he stands so close. The reason is simple, because he likes the ball close to him. One time or another in his career he decided that he had to move on top of the plate because he doesn’t like the ball away from him. For me personally, I would attack this type of hitter with pitches away from him. Ofcourse that’s not to say you can’t go in, but I’d be more likely to go hard in off the plate and make my money away.

The opposite is true for hitters who stand off the plate. These are generally speaking guys who are big and strong who like to get extended. These guys are off the plate because they don’t like the ball in on their hands, they want to get extended and drive the baseball. Pedroia (sp?) is an example. Even though he’s not a big guy, he steps in the bucket and is a little off the plate. He has a long swing and hooks the ball and drives the ball away from him. He’s more of an out inside.

Take barry bonds for example. The guy was right on the plate, and by George I can’t remember anybody jamming that guy. Not that he couldn’t necessarily hit the ball away, but he did the vast majority of his damage with balls closer to his body.[/quote]

I agree with Hammer - for older guys. Young kids often don’t know what works best for them. Standing away from the plate could be nothing more than fear of getting hit.

Just wanted to say that I faced this kid as my first batter in our championship game, and I struck him out on three pitches. I had great bite on my two seam and cutter, and he swung on all three pitches. We went on to win the game on the back of my scoreless inning. It was the best feeling hearing their dugout after a three pitch K to their first hitter.

We just played these guys who had the whole team crowd the plate we beaned a total of 11 throughout the game not intential but they didnt seem to mind it. There probably sore and bruised up right now though :lol:

I’ve actually started crowding strategically, now that I can pitch the these guys fine. I just practiced with a stand in batter right over the plate and got used to moving pitches in and out.

as a lefty, there’s nothing better than throwing some chin music up there or even puttin one hard in the ribs, followed by throwing over and picking him off while he has to slide onto his already sore ribs. haha