Pitching tips


#1

I’ve beenpitching for a couple of years. 14 years old n I really only threw a fastball (2 n 4 seem). I now throw a change up and just learned to throw a curve. I wanna really learn how to master the curve because it’s a curve where i just throw it without twisting my hand or anything (don’t know whatkind of curve it is sorry) But I was wondering if you had any tips for anything about pitching to post them here to help out me or anyone else. thanks


#2

well, theres a lot of pitching tips i could give you…you have to be more specific…motions…arm angles…what?


#3

I’ll offer a couple tips.

First, make sure that your release point for the curve is the same as it is for the fastball. Since release point is a byproduct of your mechanics leading up to that point, this means that your mechanics need to be the same as when you throw a fastball. You must not do anything different (like shortening your stride, etc.).

Second, make sure your set the wrist/forearm angle in the glove and maintain it through your entire delivery. This helps make sure you don’t twist as you throw. Twisting blows out elbows.


#4

Thanks Roger.
But they can be on anything about pitching Tanner.
Quick question. I was throwing 2-seem fastball (I have no idea how fast I throw but o well) and i went to throw a 4-seemer and it made it to the catcher but just above the ground. I started to pitch more 2-seemers and they were strikes but everytime I went to throw a 4-seemer it was always very low(I would aim high and hit low). I warmed up only throwing 2-seemers and was wondering if you only threw one pitch during warm ups could it effect the way you throw?


#5

[quote=“Top_Secret”]Thanks Roger.
But they can be on anything about pitching Tanner.
Quick question. I was throwing 2-seem fastball (I have no idea how fast I throw but o well) and i went to throw a 4-seemer and it made it to the catcher but just above the ground. I started to pitch more 2-seemers and they were strikes but everytime I went to throw a 4-seemer it was always very low(I would aim high and hit low). I warmed up only throwing 2-seemers and was wondering if you only threw one pitch during warm ups could it effect the way you throw?[/quote]when i warm up, i throw about 75-80 percent, and i throw about 30 pitches, now you should throw all of your pitches so you can see if their gonna work or not, so yes, throw all your pitches in warm ups, it might not effect you in the game, but it can help you tell if your pitch is on or not


#6

[quote=“Top_Secret”]Thanks Roger.
But they can be on anything about pitching Tanner.
Quick question. I was throwing 2-seem fastball (I have no idea how fast I throw but o well) and i went to throw a 4-seemer and it made it to the catcher but just above the ground. I started to pitch more 2-seemers and they were strikes but everytime I went to throw a 4-seemer it was always very low(I would aim high and hit low). I warmed up only throwing 2-seemers and was wondering if you only threw one pitch during warm ups could it effect the way you throw?[/quote]

I don’t know for sure without seeing you pitch but it could just be a comfort thing. I’d suggest paying attention to your grip between the two pitches. Are your fingers wider apart for one pitch vs. the other? Where is your thumb in relation to your fingers on each pitch? If you find there are differences, that would explain the different behaviors of those pitches.

As for warm-ups, you should throw in warm-ups everything you will throw in the game. I like my pitchers to have a routine that they go through before every game. Have a routine gives you something familiar and comfortable when playing in an unfamilar location. I also like my pitchers to start with fastballs and get to where they are doing reasonably well with them before moving on to other pitches. And of course, the number of pitches thrown in warm-ups has to be limited.


#7

Yeah i no i’m just full of problems.

But everytime i pitch i always get a shoulder pain or a pain above my elbow (hope you know what i’m talking about) and i always pitch through it. i wanted to know if this is would increase a chance to get an injury(or if it is an injury) and sometimes i get a pain just warming. the pain i get in my shoulder doesnt bother me that much but when i get a pain above my elbow it seems to hurt more n more with every pitch but not enough to make me quit pitching that day.


#8

This is quite troubling. Have you seen a doctor?

If not, you should.

You could be damaging your elbow and/or your shoulder.

Soreness is one thing (and fairly normal as long as it goes away over time), but pain is something else entirely.


#9

O crud i meant my shoulder gets sore but i feel some pain (not terrible pain or anything) above my elbow recently when i throw.

And i haven’t been to a doctor or anything either.


#10

You’re at a vulnerable age for injuries and need to be careful.

You are developing the muscles of a man but still have the bones of a child.

I would really consider putting the curveball aside. Do you absolutely need it at your age or are you just working on it because someone told you that you should? I say this because it’s hard to make sure you’re throwing it correctly (even if you think you are).

You might also want to consider doing some dry throwing with light wrist weights (e.g. 1 - 2.5 lbs). That could help build up the muscles in your shoulder and reduce the soreness.

How many innings do you pitch in a week? How many teams are you on? What positions do you play?


#11

sorry i was eating dinner.

but the curveball i throw just like a fastball but with 2 finger (3 including the thumb) so its not very stressful on my arm. i started benching n squatting yesterday but the group i was in was huge so i couldn’t really do much.

I pitch n play second n third in babe ruth. we havent started anything with that yet but i have been throwing in the past week n a half. i get a sore shoulder pretty quick but i usually get that all the time. n for my pain by my elbow its really just started this year. (like i said before its not a terrible pain)

but will the benching n squatting only help or hurt me?


#12

This bothers me. You may have either a mechanical problem and/or are trying to throw too hard and too far too soon.

You have to ease into things if you aren’t going to hurt yourself.

Are you going through a growth spurt? If so, that could explain some of your elbow pain. The growth plates in your elbow are most vulnerable during growth spurts.

You may not have been growing as rapidly this time last year.

Neither will do you much good (as far as baseball is concerned), and the benching can definitely hurt you if you let your elbows go behind your shoulders (e.g. bring the bar to your chest). I have the same concern with push-ups; no chest to the floor.

You don’t have to lift huge weights to see the benefits (e.g. just 1 - 2.5 lb wrist weights or dumbbells). You should do some exercises that work the muscles of your rotator cuff and improve your core strength (e.g. abdominal strength). That could be as simple as sit-ups and/or crunches. Also, see if you can find a copy of Tom Seaver’s book on pitching and look at the exercises he discusses on pages 28-36.


#13

i really just lifting to help gain some strenght or everything in general but wanted to check if it would effect me in a bad way for baseball.

And for my shoulder it may be a mechanical problem. I’d post a video but i dont know how.

my growth spurt happened like last year really this year i haven’t grown much. (a late side effect?) and i’ll c if i can check out the book, thanks


#14

This bothers me. You may have either a mechanical problem and/or are trying to throw too hard and too far too soon.

You have to ease into things if you aren’t going to hurt yourself.

Are you going through a growth spurt? If so, that could explain some of your elbow pain. The growth plates in your elbow are most vulnerable during growth spurts.

You may not have been growing as rapidly this time last year.

Neither will do you much good (as far as baseball is concerned), and the benching can definitely hurt you if you let your elbows go behind your shoulders (e.g. bring the bar to your chest). I have the same concern with push-ups; no chest to the floor.

You don’t have to lift huge weights to see the benefits (e.g. just 1 - 2.5 lb wrist weights or dumbbells). You should do some exercises that work the muscles of your rotator cuff and improve your core strength (e.g. abdominal strength). That could be as simple as sit-ups and/or crunches. Also, see if you can find a copy of Tom Seaver’s book on pitching and look at the exercises he discusses on pages 28-36.[/quote]

More irresponsible advice from a person who doesnt know and doesnt know he doesnt know, the WORST kind!!!


#15

Exactly what is wrong about what I said?


#16

Exactly what is wrong about what I said?[/quote]

Just because YOU may be against strength training and YOU may think that either benching or squatting is not good for baseball players DOES NOT make your notion on this matter right. In fact you are WRONG, As far as benching goes they may be other forms of benching that are safer for baseball players shoulders such as dumbell benches. Squats done correctly within a myriad of types/styles should be a must for baseball players. As I have suggested over and over again perhaps read some of Mike Griffens stuff if you dont believe me. Bottom line Chris sooner or later strength WILL become an issue and there is no way in hell that a 1-2lb. wrist weight or dumbell will come even remotely close to addressing the issue. In what form the issue represents itself may not be known but rest assured it will happen, strength has many facets. It is highly reccomended that YOUTH aged kids that are actively involved in sports do some form of stength and conditioning training. Every credible source in the sports medicine field has stated this. The old wivestail that the kid will grow hair on the bottom of his feet is over and done with. If a kid wants to throw harder in part he needs to become stronger. If a person wants to run faster part of that is getting stronger. If a person wants to swing a bat faster he also needs to get stronger. If a person wants to jump higher he needs to get stronger. If you disagree thats fine, say I disagree for whatever reasons. Dont say that both benching and squatting is not beneficial for baseball players, which is basically what you said and that is WRONG becasue they both can be EXTREMEMLY beneficial for baseball players, especially those that need to address certain weaknesses. My own kid who I do not bring into posts unless its RELEVANT because frankly I find people that constantly harp about junior to be nothing short of reprehensible. At any rate last year at 14 he cruised in the 70-72 mph range, pitching very very limited innings due to an injury. He trained pretty tough all winter did not even pick a baseball up until Febuary, he did not even work on any mechanical functions, He may have grown about 1 inch over the winter. Hes now 15 and cruising at 78. Where would you think it came from Chris? The difference between you and me is I have a plan for the kids I work with, my goal is not to reinvent the act of pitching a baseball. Im more interested in getting the kids I work with better able to compete and hopefully get them to compete at each level and hopefully college if they have the desire to. Yours is different, your searching for something that does not exist seemingly thinking that you and your mentor can turn the act of pitching a baseball into a nonrisk environment, which is impossible to do due to the nature of the beast. I know through experience on a personal level as well as a coaching level what it takes, you dont. To be honest what you bring to the table starting at 15 years old is very very important as to what you will bring to the table at 17-18 when it really matters. Ive been down this road many times with track athletes as well as baseball pitchers. Show me a kid who cannot throw a shot 50ft as a freshman his chances of throwing 60 as a senior are probabaly not impossible but not nearly as good as if he can hit 50 as a frosh, seen it many many times. Show me a frosh that cannot throw at least in the low 70 mph. range and his chances of throwing what he will need to to compete at the next level are strained, again probably not impossible but the dream is a whole lot tougher to achieve, I know from experience. It is very very RARE that a mechanical flaw that is fixed will alone get the kid where he needs to be. More times than not it is a strength issue moreso than mechanical. If a person has been pitching competetively for a number of years mechanics are probably as good as they are going to get as far as there relevance in regards to success, again there are exceptions but its just not the norm. Even if it were it would still be NO excuse for not training. Why do you think so many high school pitchers hit the wall at near or around 80 mph , especially if they have decent mechanics? I give you a hint if a kid is throwing 70 as a freshman and still throwing mid 70’s as a junior HES WEAK!!! he needs to get stronger and more powerful no amount of mechanical adjustments are going to get him beyond that limit, thats why one form of strength is billed as “limit strength”. As in ALL you can muster up, after awhile once the person has met his limit stength no mechanical adjustment will do anything in regards to performance, hes maxed out hes reached his “limit”. His body will not allow him to go beyond that. Again have to be redundant on a baseball board, there are many exceptions to the norm but as a coach it would be nothing short of stupidity to sit and wait and hope that you MAY be one of the exceptions, thats the point!


#17

Wow that was pretty long. I throw low 70’s(i think low 70’s at least)-freshman highschool. I want to become better and i’m gonna go for jv pitcher next year. The coach says to work on mechanics and batting. the mechanics aren’t a big deal but for pitching i want to be able to throw it up there with the other pitchers. (this has probably been asked before and if it has sorry) but when you say they cant throw that fast because there weak, how can they get stronger?


#18

Live in the weightroom. Add some musclemass to your legs. Check with Mike Griffin about getting a regimen designed to fit your needs. There are a lot of ways to get stronger. Adding velocity, you could try band workouts or a weighted ball routine (with professional supervision).


#19

I’m certainly not against all strength training. Some can be very valuable. However, you have to do the right exercises and I do not believe that benching and squatting are particularly relevant to pitching.

Agreed.

Why? I would focus on the muscles around the hips and torso since those are the ones that help to rotate the torso and shoulders.

Of course it will, and as he gets older he should use heavier weights. However, given his current age (14) he should start with lighter weights.

You should also keep in mind that Tom Seaver never used very heavy dumbbells. Probably 5 pounders at the most.

I completely agree. However, they have to be the right kinds of exercises focused on the right parts of the body (e.g. torso and shoulders).


#20

If I were you, I would focus on two things.

  1. The muscles of the shoulder (e.g. rotator cuff) that hold the shoulder joint together (and don’t exert much force themselves).

  2. The muscles of the hips and torso that allow you to rotate the torso and thus the shoulders. I believe the rotation of the hips, torso, and shoulders is the primary source of power; the arm is mostly just along for the ride. I am actually in agreement with Tom House here. In his new book he talks about research that indicates that something like 80% of a pitcher’s power comes from the rotation of the hips, torso, and shoulders.

The beauty of focusing on the muscles that rotate the hips, torso, and shoulders is that it will also improve your ability to hit for power since these are the muscles that rotational hitting mechanics are designed to tap into.