Pitching stride


#1

my stride is 72-74 inches and im 6’6, is this too much, i know the 77% stuff but i wanted a opinion


#2

I tend to prefer shorter strides (e.g. 80%) because I think it can increase the ability of the hips to rotate and raise the release point, and you’re at 90%.

However, I also believe that if something ain’t broke, you may not want to try to fix it.


#3

As long as you have the flexibility and functional strength to maintain good mechanics (e.g. good posture and balance, explosive hip rotation), then your stride length is fine.

Nolan Ryan’s stride was longer than his height.


#4

who are some MLB pithers with short(er) strides?

This left rookie for the Braves, Chuck James, has a very short stride … he tops out at about 92 mph … short little leg kick, short stride…


#5

angel guzman for the cubs has a very short stride too


#6

Steve Trachsel is pretty short too … And there’s an article on this site about MEts reliever Heath Bell going with a short stride… Bell hits mid-90s cosistently.


#7

[quote=“Tanner Lorenz”]angel guzman for the cubs has a very short stride too[/quote] You’re right. Guzie’s a good buddy of mine and he throws 94-95 mph with a very short stride. But his hip rotation is excellent – and he’s got a super fluid arm. So it works for him.


#8

[quote=“Steven Ellis”][quote=“Tanner Lorenz”]angel guzman for the cubs has a very short stride too[/quote] You’re right. Guzie’s a good buddy of mine and he throws 94-95 mph with a very short stride. But his hip rotation is excellent – and he’s got a super fluid arm. So it works for him.[/quote]could you get an autograph for me, im a huge fan of his! :lol:


#9

What do you consider overstriding?


#10

Striding so far that it causes problems.


#11

I think the “but” in the above sentence is misplaced.

I believe that a shorter stride can often help hip rotation. In many cases guys hurt their hip rotation by overstriding.


#12

Does overstriding have any correlation with your arm not being able to catch up to your body, it seems to me that if you stride so far then you got to get your arm moving faster, and you will have more of a tendancy to leave balls in the zone when you start getting tired. To me it makes sense that a short stride would be more beneficial because you will better be able to get on top of the baseball.


#13

A longer stride is most likely going to take more time so your arm would have more time to do it’s thing. It’s the short stride that causes the upper body to have to be quicker.

I don’t think there is a relationship between stride length and “getting on top of the ball”. If you overstride, there is a chance your torso could end up leaning back with your shoulders aligned uphill making it harder to keep your pitches down. In that case, you need to shorten the stride so that you can maintain proper posture.


#14

I’ve heard that a short stribe helps you throw a better curve b/c you can more easily get on top of the ball … that’s what I heard … not sure if I beleive it, though…


#15

Although that may or may not be true, you wouldn’t want to shorten your stride for that purpose only. It would 'tip your hand" if your cb stride was shorter than your fb stride. Keep 'em all the same. Now, I don’t recommend a short stride, especially if it’s intent is to simply raise your release point. Shortening the stride reduces the time you have to generate c.o.g. sideways momentum.


#16

I don’t think so, because I think guys tend to have more problems when they go to a slide step. Taking a slide step reduces the time before foot strike, and could cause timing problems.

If you are overstriding, then you may actually be later to foot strike, which would make you less likely to rush.

This makes the case that overstriding and understriding are relative both to other pitcher’s and to a particular pitcher’s typical stride length. In other words, a guy who understrides relative to his peers could have timing problems due to overstriding during the course of a particular game.


#17

That makes sense!

I have a problem with slide stepping as well.


#18

Just to be clear, there’s nothing wrong with a slide step.

The problem comes when guys switch between a slide step and a full knee lift in the same inning and end up screwing up their timing (because of the different times to get to foot plant).