Pitching Sidearm


#1

I’m currently a sophomore at St. Norbert College and was wondering why this site speaks so strongly against throwing sidearm.
I partially tore the labrum in my right (throwing) shoulder before my senior year in high school and ended up throwing with limited success and velocity at my normal arm slot that season. My freshman year in college was a wash, and after some work last summer, I ended up pitching sidearm in summer and fall ball. The results were astonishing.
This year, I’ve played in something like ten of our team’s 18 games, throwing on back to back days without problems. I never recovered quickly before, but now I thow 30 pitch bullpens every day when we’re not playing. I am a reliever, as is probably assumed, but by dropping down to a very low (not quite Bradford-esque) delivery, I have revived my career, saved my arm a lot of pain, and giving myself hope of playing a little longer than most people.


#2

What makes you think this site is so strongly against throwing sidearm? I didn’t have that impression.

[quote]I partially tore the labrum in my right (throwing) shoulder before my senior year in high school and ended up throwing with limited success and velocity at my normal arm slot that season. My freshman year in college was a wash, and after some work last summer, I ended up pitching sidearm in summer and fall ball. The results were astonishing.
This year, I’ve played in something like ten of our team’s 18 games, throwing on back to back days without problems. I never recovered quickly before, but now I thow 30 pitch bullpens every day when we’re not playing. I am a reliever, as is probably assumed, but by dropping down to a very low (not quite Bradford-esque) delivery, I have revived my career, saved my arm a lot of pain, and giving myself hope of playing a little longer than most people.[/quote]
Glad to hear it’s worked out for you and that things are going well.


#3

Throwing side arm can be a great thing. You can move the ball so many different ways its almost funny. throwing side arm alone gives you some different variations of a normal fastball


#4

throwing sidearm/submarine with good mechanics aren’t worst than throwing over hand maybe a bit stress less due to the fact that slowing your pitches a bit will give you big movements. you don’t want to throw only with your arm though because just like overhand pitching you will ruin your elbow and shoulder. a lot of people tend to throw with the arm only going in that slot and that’s mostly what people dont like about it. it is hard arm slots to master and can be rough on control too. but it seems to wortk for you. did you know that bradford went from 3/4 to the arm slot he has right now without him actually noticing? he said he realized he was so low when he got himself on camera for mechanics working. i thought that wass pretty funny.


#5

yes, i think i read about bradford’s change in delivery in Moneyball.
i got to see him throw against Milwaukee last year on mother’s day, right after i had decided to throw sidearm. it was very interesting to see how well he fared throwing only two pitches above 80 mph that day, yet he controlled the first two hitters he faced. one of the disadvantages i’ve noticed though, is that there is ZERO room for error going up in the strike zone. he got one pitch up, and Bill Hall sent us home happy with a walk-off homerun using the pink bat.
i only throw 75 mph, but as i said, as long as i keep it down in the zone it’s become a wonderful thing for me.
we’ll see how it fares tonight against a D-1 team, Milwaukee.