Pitching off a mound

I have a problem, when I pitch off flat ground or maybe just a 5 inch mound my pitcing is a lot more accurate and FAST, but when I go onto a full size mound I start to throw all over the place and I am much slower.
I was wondering if there are any mechanical changes that you need to make when transferring onto a mound
If a video is needed I will try to post one whenever I can

pitching off a mound brings lots of mechanical issues when used to throwing off flatground

flatground and mound pitching require 2 different sets of mechanics

my guess would be that your opening up too early- when ur on the mound u have more time to stay linear as compared to flatground

the only way to sort ur mound mechanics out is to actually get on a mound and throw regularly

gl

thanks, your probably right about opening up too early

the mound on our field doesn’t have much of a drop on it so its always a struggle to go anywhere else and pitch

is there any sure way to be able to stay closed and not open up too early on a mound

I made this post on May 31, 2008 relative to another question, but a lot of it can pertain to your situation.

The mounds that you’ll find on public and school ball fields are a challenge to say the least. They’re not designed or constructed with quality in mind, nor are they cared for… usually … by workers that are skilled in the mounds refurbishment (repair).

All in all, this construction and care cost $$$. And if town fathers are gonig to spend money on ball fields or schools, police and fire… well ball fields are a hard sell.

Another problem is the fallacy of …" a steeper mound will produce a faster fastball."

Now you and your guys come along … assuming that some one has taken into consideration your turning and moving, stretching out your stride leg and landing repeatedly … and still maintaining some sort of balance.

WRONG!

Here’s some examples of typical pitcher mounds on many public and private ball fields:
It’s common to find a rounded dome with a pitcher’s rubber stuck onto a block of cement. It’s also common to find a composition of sand, dirt, dried clay, gravel and even small rocks.

As time goes by, you’ll find a series of holes and a slope that’s either depressed or raised between the pither’s and the spot where your stride foot lands. To compansate for this, an iron garden rake can be used between innings to reshape the mound for safe productive use. But this simple peice of equipment is rarely brought to the field… even by DI clubs. Check out my example below.

Also, if you don’t bring an iron rake and refurbish your mound in between innings … you’ll run into this kind of mound:

And if left unchecked… you’ll more than likely be pitching off of something like this:

My advice to you is:
DON’T TAKE FOR GRANTED THAT YOU HAVE TO PITCH OFF THIS JUNK. BRING AN IRON GARDEN RAKE AND MAKE THE SURFACE YOUR ABOUT TO PITCH OFF REASONABLE FOR YOUR SAFETY AND THE SAFETY OF THE BATTERS YOUR ABOUT TO PTICH TO. START THIS ISSUE EARLY IN YOUR BASEBALL SEASON WITH COACHES AND ADMINISTRATORS.

And here’s a littl bit of information for you… Once the home team gives their lineup to the umpire in chief … the umpire in cheif is responsible for declaring the field playable … and your YOUR SAFETY. Certified Board Umpires receive money for their services and as such their judgement should include the safety of the mounds that your pitching off of. This is one of the reasons why the carry insurance. A protective measure when being sued for lack of good judgement.

So, take more responsibility for your own well being and bring an iron garden rake with you to help condition your surface before every appearance.

Aslo, because of these conditions on mounds Vs flat surfaces you’ll also run into holes in front of the pitchers rubber …like the example bedow:

If you’re a right-handed pitcher, your pivot foot will be pointing down like in the example on the left… if your a left-handed pitcher, your pivot foot will be pointing down like on the right.

In either case, when your foot is pointing down you weight is going to be shifted off center more often than not … thus not giving you the balance you need to progress forward with your delivery just when you need it the most.

Coach B.

wow thats some real useful advice for caring for a mound, some I’ve pitched off of are in really bad shape (not as bad as some of them mind you)

this is probably one of the reasons why I dont like other mounds cause they’re not all the same

I’m just not comfortable with the fact that your dropping down which usually makes me throw the ball low

:bothered:
Coach B. Looking at those mounds made me kinda sick to my stomach…