pitching mechanics

How should a youth repond when, during a game he hears out loud from a coach or parent…Don’t overthrow…Stay within yourself…Let him hit it…I’ll tell you what to throw.[/b]

This can be decent advice.

Overthrowing and not staying within yourself can lead to rushing which can lead to leaving the ball up in the zone which can lead to bombs. Trying to blow the ball past the hitter can do the same thing.

My son’s strategy is similar to Tom Glavine’s. He always keeps the ball down, so that if they manage to hit it then 9 times out of 10 it’s a weak grounder to SS.

Ignore it and throw a strike. If you are paying attention off the field when you are pitching you are making a mistake that could mess with your concentration. If your coach is going to “teach” you something he needs to discuss it after your performance. Now that said almost everyone says encouraging and helpful hints while you pitch, great, just let it be crowd noise to you.

stay focused, bare down, and get the next few outs or whatever the situation is. Dont let it get to you, stay calm and just hit your spots. You put everything else past you like your coach and all those things that can distract you, ytou’ll be just fine

Sounds like they’re (coach/parent) trying to help. I’d expect more of that from a parent. The coach should know he needs to address things in between innings or on the trip to the mound. This is all part of being a pitcher. Along with indirect heckling like “you can hit this guy, this guy ain’t nothing.”

Now you know you’ve got a problem when your pitcher’s father yells, “You Suck!” from the bleachers. It happens.

yeah im going to have to go with dino on this one. The coach should call time and go to the mound or wait in between innings. Well put dino

Those types of comments are usually given when a pitcher is trying too hard. Maybe he’s trying to throw the ball really hard. Or maybe he’s really trying to snap off a big curve. In cases like this, the pitcher is probably sacrificing some aspect of his mechanics and is deviating from what he has practiced. He shouldn’t do that. He needs to trust and stick with the mechanics he’s worked on in practice.

Now, I also agree with JD in that the pitcher needs to be able to tune out the fans. And, hopefully, the coach is careful in selecting his opportunities to give instruction during a game.

The coach needs to talk to the father and nip that in the bud.

That father got tossed off the premises for the rest of the season. Its too bad becasue the kids a good athlete but he has no confidence. Imagine that.

Do these kind of parents understand how important makeup (e.g. confidence) is to a pitcher (and to scouts)? And that in many cases they are psychologically destroying a kid?

Whenever I see a pitcher that I like, my next question is “What’s his makeup like?” You always wonder whether a guy can do it in the big time.

Rick Ankiel is an example of a guy who had all the tools but who didn’t have the makeup needed to succeed, and it sounds like his dad was a real nightmare.

I’m amazed at how many times I’ve come across really great kids with a-holes for parents.

yes i have to agree with Roger ive played many teams doing travel ball and i have seen crazy parents even take their own kids out of the game and go home , during the game! unbelievable im fortunate enough not to have parents like this.

All players need to learn to tune out noise from the stands — good or bad. Obviously, that can be difficult, especially for younger kids, but the goal should be to focus so intently on the game that everything else is blocked out.

I think one of the reasons I hate golf – and tennis, too – is that the participants have the right to complete silence during play (OK, maybe there’s jealousy there). Playing baseball, football, basketball, and other sports would be a heck of a lot easier if you didn’t have to work on ignoring all the noise. But, learning to focus and block out the rest is part of the game.

Of course you are correct in saying how tough it is to tune-out but that has to be taught and repeated as you know. I anticipated the wear ear plug response from at least one reader…Kids who try to burn a few in and become wild should be told to stay within and don’t overthrow. Would anyone agree, however, that we must at least in h.s. extend oneself andexperience the control problem associated then be taught how to compensate and become more capable without having to reach the mid to high 90’s

It’s not unlike training a dog. Ideally, you teach a dog to listen to your commands in a quiet setting, without distractions, then gradually introduce him to different settings that have noises, interesting smells, other dogs, etc.

Not to compare anyone’s kid to a dog, but pointing out that learning focus begins in practice — it’s something that obviously gets overlooked.

Also, if a dog can learn to block out distractions, why can’t a human?

:wink:

I can’t wait to read all the responses to this one. My opinion comes from a developmental standpoint (getting players to the big leagues).

The worst thing you can do for a young pitcher is tell him to “just throw strikes”. What is easier to do…Get a pitcher with a 95 mph fastball and suspect command to throw a strike or get an 82 mph strike thrower to throw the ball 95 mph? It’s a ridiculous question but it illustrates the correct developmental sequence. Learn to throw hard first, then learn command. By easing up to “just throw strikes” the body becomes conditioned to operate in that manner and loses a lot of it’s explosive capabilities.

Part of throwing the ball hard is trying to throw it hard. This means incorporating momentum into the delivery and really letting the ball go. Let the coaches in the minor leagues tell you when to take a little bit off.

If you are a high school pitcher who throws 80 mph and gets everybody out, you will not get drafted. If you don’t get anybody out and throw every 3rd pitch off the backstop at 95 mph you are a pro prospect. It’s that simple.

The same goes for hitting. Parents clap when little leaguers hit the ball. No!!! Clap when they hit it hard. Baseball guys have a name for hitters who swing to just hit the ball…They call them outs!

[quote=“slbb5”]I can’t wait to read all the responses to this one. My opinion comes from a developmental standpoint (getting players to the big leagues).

The worst thing you can do for a young pitcher is tell him to “just throw strikes”. What is easier to do…Get a pitcher with a 95 mph fastball and suspect command to throw a strike or get an 82 mph strike thrower to throw the ball 95 mph? It’s a ridiculous question but it illustrates the correct developmental sequence. Learn to throw hard first, then learn command. By easing up to “just throw strikes” the body becomes conditioned to operate in that manner and loses a lot of it’s explosive capabilities.

Part of throwing the ball hard is trying to throw it hard. This means incorporating momentum into the delivery and really letting the ball go. Let the coaches in the minor leagues tell you when to take a little bit off.

If you are a high school pitcher who throws 80 mph and gets everybody out, you will not get drafted. If you don’t get anybody out and throw every 3rd pitch off the backstop at 95 mph you are a pro prospect. It’s that simple.

The same goes for hitting. Parents clap when little leaguers hit the ball. No!!! Clap when they hit it hard. Baseball guys have a name for hitters who swing to just hit the ball…They call them outs![/quote]

OK, but what does this have to do with the subject of the thread? (which is focusing / dealing with outside noise)

A couple of the early posts made me think of it. Sorry if it is in the wrong place Joe.

No problem, I thought maybe there was more to the post and the form process ate it or you forgot to tie it in with the thread. We count on you for good posts and didn’t want to miss anything.

:smiley: