Pitching grips: How to Grip and Throw Baseball Pitches


#1

Hello,

What pitching grip would fit a lefty better and what pitching grip would fit a right hander better?


#2

Steve has an article on all kinds of grips here:

http://www.thecompletepitcher.com/pitching_grips.htm

lefty or righty, no difference


#3

Yes i know about that article.

But i recently tested the grips with 2 Right handed pitchers and myself a Left handed pitcher.
I noticed that the 2 Right handed pitcher had more trouble throwing a Slider as throwing a Change-up.
While i as a lefty had more trouble throwing a Change-up than throwing a slider.


#4

I tend to agree that there’s no difference between “left handed” pitching grips and “right handed” pitching grips. They’re the same. But the pitch might act differently because of differences in arm action and motion.


#5

curveball is supposed to comeeasier for a lefthanded pitcher, even though i’ve seen a lot more right handers with good curveballs than left handers. i personally used to have a good one but i tended to exagerate it too much to the point that it was coming close to an eephus pitch.

screwballs are supposed to be easier for a left hander because of the added pronation in the left hand.


#6

[quote=“4pie”]curveball is supposed to comeeasier for a lefthanded pitcher, even though i’ve seen a lot more right handers with good curveballs than left handers. i personally used to have a good one but i tended to exagerate it too much to the point that it was coming close to an eephus pitch.

screwballs are supposed to be easier for a left hander because of the added pronation in the left hand.[/quote]

In my opinion those are myths. Every “body” is different — lefty or righty — so what comes easier or more difficult will depend on your coordination, strength, arm length, finger shapes, body type, DNA, etc., rather than which hand you throw with.


#7

I agree with Joe on that one. Throwing is throwing. Also, everyone pronates and they do so on every pitch: fastball, slider, curveball, screwball, etc.


#8

I think that arm slot is generally a bigger factor than handedness.

However, for a LHP a screwball might be a better pitch than a slider because a screwball will move down and out to a RHB while a slider will move down and in to a RHB (which can be a dangerous location).

And before you bring it up, I am trying to figure out how Steve Carlton (a LHP) threw his slider. I think he may have thrown it differently than a RHP would.


#9

carlton shows his grip on his website, no wrist snap or anything. the angle of the wrist and angle of the ball were doing the job.


#10

That’s how a slider is generally thrown: set it and forget it. It should just be thrown like an offset fastball.

I know of some coaches that teach it by saying to twist or “shoot the gun.” I think that’s terrible on the elbow.


#11

A bit off topic but I think people make a lot of assumptions about lefties that just aren’t true. For example, people think that a lefty naturally has more movement on the ball than a righty. I doubt that very much. My opinion is that because hitters don’t follow the ball all the way from plate to release and because they are used to the tail on a righties pitch in their minds they see a righties tailing fastball as coming in dead straight. On the other hand since their mind has built in an adjustment for a righty’s tail when they run into the tail on a lefty’s fastball it looks like it is moving twice as much as it really is. It wouldn’t surprise me if there are a few longtime mlb hitters who have learned to process pitches differently depending on if the pitcher is a righty or lefty.

If you doubt this try to remember back to when you were a kid facing kid pitchers. Fastballs came in dead straight. Yet now if you go watch from the side at kids that age pitching, you can see a big arc in the pitch. That’s because we see the ball at release, we lose it and then we pick it up out in front of the plate a ways. Our mind fills in the interval as a straight line.


#12

I completely agree with this.
This is my first post here, and looks like an incredible site. I’m 17 and working hard to become a college pitcher and will do whatever it takes so I’m real open-minded about learning everything I can.