Pitching + Batting


#1

Do High School coaches and College Teams look at how well the pitcher can bat? Or is it all just pitching?

I’m a very good batter, hardly ever strike out, does that multiply my chances of getting a starting position on a High School team, or getting drafted by a College?

Let me know, Thanks.


#2

Anything you can add to your resume is going to help. If you can challenge for a spot on the field, as well as being a really good pitcher, a coach should be jumping for joy.

I forget what team it was, but during the CWS there was a catcher that also worked as the team’s closer. The announcers were just blown away. The guy caught 8 full innings and then came in to pitch the ninth throwing 96+. Just flat out blew people away.


#3

Ok. I’m an all around good baseball player. Mostly played 1st base this year because of my jumping, and short hop catching abbilities. But I can play any positon on the field. Mostly I played, 1st base, short-stop, 3rd, left and center field.

Thank’s for the input!!!


#4

If you are a good hitter, and enjoy hitting, keep working at it.

I remember in my senior year of college, we recruited a young shortstop/pitcher … the first time I caught him from the mound, he was throwing high 80s/low 90s and I said to him, “don’t bring your bat next practice, you’re a pitcher now.”

Well he brought his bat anyway and hit two homeruns in our first game … he eventually broke all kinds of school records and played some professional ball as a hitter.

He might have pitched in three games his whole college career! (Boy did I learn a lesson!)

On that same team, we had also recruited two outstanding high school players specifically for their bats. They had both hit over .450 with home runs, etc. and had been penciled into the lineup as freshmen. Well, throughout their freshman year, both had trouble staying in the lineup and the following year turned to pitching, and became our two top moundsmen by their junior years.

Oh, and there is the story of a young high school hurler who was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles. He was a better pitcher, but showed some potential as a hitter. They asked him whether he preferred to pitch or play the field. His answer: play the field, because “as a batter I can play every day”.

The player? Cal Ripken.

The lesson: keep all your options open, do what you enjoy, and let the cards fall where they may.