Pitching 100%

I warmed up good and decided to just focus on geting more momentum. I think it looks better. But…I had no control and it seemed that I had slow velocity. I know good mechanics don’t happen overnight so I’m going to stick with them. I seemed to throw it a litte on the high side at times. But it alwyas seemed like it was harder just high. I think I just have to adjust to the new release point.

Sorry about the screwed up video somehow one segment of the batters view got in there. Oh well, something went wrong but its good enough there are 2 slowmo’s at the end.

not loose enough

Thats not very specific.

Theres something weird there I’m just having trouble picking it out. I think you look a little too forced maybe. You need to relax a bit, tense shoulders rob velocity. Just try getting loose and relaxed, then you will start throwing smoothly and then the MPH would come. It helped me at the end of the year rise from 73-74 to 77-78.

Yeah I see what you mean. Might have to do with just changing stuff up. It will take time before I’m not very robotic.

Bower old bean you need to do the towel drill. Your PA decelerates and ends up at your left hip. You lose the ball high, and you lose velocity.

And what those other guys who actually know a thing or two about pitching said…

Hose :smiley:

[quote=“hoseman18”]Bower old bean you need to do the towel drill. Your PA decelerates and ends up at your left hip. You lose the ball high, and you lose velocity.

And what those other guys who actually know a thing or two about pitching said…

Hose :D[/quote]
How would doing the towel dirll help that? I’m not trying to say that in a dickish way, haha.

[quote=“3and0”]

How would doing the towel dirll help that? I’m not trying to say that in a dickish way, haha.[/quote]

Two things about the towel drill: you have to reach out to make contact, training your body to extend forward over your front leg (chest over knee); and in order to snap the towel you need to accelerate past the release point, which ensures that you don’t shorten your follow-through or decelerate too soon.

Hose

watch the whole video
it shows why the towel drill is bad

[quote=“hoseman18”][quote=“3and0”]

How would doing the towel dirll help that? I’m not trying to say that in a dickish way, haha.[/quote]

Two things about the towel drill: you have to reach out to make contact, training your body to extend forward over your front leg (chest over knee); and in order to snap the towel you need to accelerate past the release point, which ensures that you don’t shorten your follow-through or decelerate too soon.

Hose[/quote]
Hm, once my shoulder is feeling better I may try that out and do it throughout the winter. Sometimes living in Canada sucks,haha

I actually think that it will help. Heres my pitching philosophy. Forget what the extremists say. If I think somethings going to help me I’m going to do it. I had a feeling something wasn’t working well with my arm action. I’m going to try out the towel drill. Even if it doesn’t help I can still work on my momentum and overall mechanics.

My girlfriend shows horses and she got grand champion in a show so they gave her a bunch of towels. She gave a bunch to my mom. I’m thinking they will come in very handy.

I agree with Mills that pitchers should pitch from a mound, under game-like intensity or as near to it as it can be made without actually playing. What I don’t agree with is that drills are worthless.

Drills develop muscle memory, allow specific parts of the mechanics to be identified as needing work and then honed. They are useful in alleviating and rectifying mechanical faults. And they are useful in developing in the pitcher’s mind, an understanding of the pieces of the act of pitching as they relate to his/her own body and athletic ability.

Also, his description of the towel drill causing the pitcher to miss the release point misses the point. The act of getting the chest over the front knee is what separates the best from the rest. It encourages the pitcher to continue his arm acceleration past the point of release. Consider that you would never run from home to the first base bag and then stop abruptly. No. You run through the bag. Why? For one thing, because maintaining your acceleration through the bag keeps you from decelerating before you get to the bag. In other words, you stay at top speed until you are past the bag, getting you there faster.

The towel drill can help train the pitcher to maintain his arm acceleration through the release instead of just
up to the release.

Hose

We will see tomorrow. I had no control I couldn’t even throw a strike today. But I made some drastic changes. I did the towel drill inbetween innings of the Yanks and Sox game. I’m going to see how I am tomorrow. The towel drill really helped me to see that my stride was 100%. I took 2 inches off of it which is still fine so I will have more control with that. Then I felt like I was throwing good with the towel. My arm aftion felt great. I think it will really help me tomorrow, I’ll throw some.

you don’t HAVE to get your momentum going forward so quckly. There’s nothing wrong with having a motion thats nice and slow. I mean look at Dan Haren he litteraly pauses at the top of his balance point. And he isn’t moving forward until he starts his stride.

Yeah your right, thats why I said I took a couple inches off my stride noticing it was 100%. I just need to find a medium. That is the first time I really added a lot of momentum.

Mills has a big hang-up with the towel drill. I think it’s his vehicle for taking stabs at Tom House. But, really, he needs to get over it. I also don’t like his demonstration of the drill because when he shows how the drill supposedly leads to cartwheeling instead of rotating, his demonstration of rotation shows the hips and shoulders rotating together. I think he knows better but he sure didn’t show it in that video.

House does not teach the purpose of the towel drill being for “extension”. In fact, House teaches that the release point is the result of the mechanics leading up to it - not a conscious effort of the pitcher to extend his arm out front. Mills misses the point on this.

What I noticed in Bower’s video is a lack of trunk flexion. Normally, after the shoulders rotate and right before the arm whips forward, the upper torso will be in a stacked position with the low back arched in an isometric load and then the low back releases and the trunk flexes forward. In Bower’s case, however, he stays upright. So, he’s missing the last link in the chain firing right before the arm whips forward. This also is likely to make the follow-through more stressful.

So, I’m with Hose - I think the towel drill would be a great way to work on incorporating trunk flexion into the delivery.

[quote=“Roger”]
What I noticed in Bower’s video is a lack of trunk flexion. I think the towel drill would be a great way to work on incorporating trunk flexion into the delivery.[/quote]

Thanks, Roger. That’s what I was getting at right there.

Hose

Yeah and I wasn’t doing the towel drill to see how much “extension” I could get. When I went out and did it I was doing it for what hose said to make sure I follow through the release point. And I did it to work on my mechanics. They are a little uncomfortable right now.

Roger I’m not sure what “Trunk Flexion” is. I think if I knew this your statement in your 3rd paragraph would make more sense to me.

Thanks everyone

Bower

Trunk flexion simply means bending forward at the waist.

alright now this might not help a whole lot by try not moving your head so much from side to side try to keep it as still as possible. I know that used to be my problem and then I fixed it and gained about 3 mph and had much better control and moveent