Pitchers vs Quarterbacks


#21

[quote=“101mph”][quote=“UndersizedRHP”]I’ll open a whole new can of worms.

I bet that every quarterback in the NFL can throw a baseball at least 85 mph.[/quote]

Agreed. I’ll bet you it’s closer to 90.

8)[/quote]
except Chad Pennington.

He throws like a girlllllll


#22

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”][quote=“101mph”][quote=“UndersizedRHP”]I’ll open a whole new can of worms.

I bet that every quarterback in the NFL can throw a baseball at least 85 mph.[/quote]

Agreed. I’ll bet you it’s closer to 90.

8)[/quote]
except Chad Pennington.

He throws like a girlllllll[/quote]

Two labrum surgeries tends to do that.


#23

[quote=“kyleb”][quote=“UndersizedRHP”][quote=“101mph”][quote=“UndersizedRHP”]I’ll open a whole new can of worms.

I bet that every quarterback in the NFL can throw a baseball at least 85 mph.[/quote]

Agreed. I’ll bet you it’s closer to 90.

8)[/quote]
except Chad Pennington.

He throws like a girlllllll[/quote]

Two labrum surgeries tends to do that.[/quote]

Not if you work hard enough… I had a part of my labrum scrape off completely and i’ve rehabbed after it and i’m throwing harder than ever!

Hes never had that strong of an arm anyway.


#24

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]Not if you work hard enough… I had a part of my labrum scrape off completely and i’ve rehabbed after it and i’m throwing harder than ever!

Hes never had that strong of an arm anyway.[/quote]

Yeah, but in baseball you don’t typically have 260+ lb men who run the 40 in 4.7 seconds chasing you! :slight_smile:


#25

Thats very true, unless you’re George Bell going after Aaron Sele with Mo Vaughn chasing you from 1st base!


#26

Do QB’s really have throw limits like pitchers have pitch counts? And do people really get concerned that QB’s throw too much, like they do with youth bb pitchers? (Cut me some slack, I was a soccer guy :slight_smile: )


#27

the only time ive ever heard of people being concerned with the number of throws a QB makes is when Colt Brennan was qb of Hawaii. He would throw the ball upwards of 60 times a game. They said he would have to ice his arm heavilly afterwards… but ice is something that many pitchers do after a simple bullpen. I think that pitchers baby themselves and eachother by being afriad of hurting themselves (btw i am currently writing this as a sit in my bed with a bag of ice on my chest from pulling a muscle that connects my ribs to my sternum. I hurt myself doing dips with a weight belt with 70 lbs hanging from the bottom… so maybe i could learn a little something from every1s carefullness)


#28

I do both on the college level…here’s my thoughts…

Workouts will be different…

Baseball is about staying long and lean. With football it is hard to just be long and lean because you will have people hitting you. Football you have to worry about the physicality of the sport.

Throwing motion is very different…

With football you want a strong wrist because the ball is heavier and oval shaped, if you throw with a loose wrist, the ball will come out soft and wobbly. Throwing a football, you can’t release the ball with your wrist facing the target, because of the shape of the ball.Baseball a loose wrist is very useful…the curveball is the same as throwing a football except for the wrist snap…almost like a slider in a sense. Football you can’t stride out too far with your lower body because the ball will dive down in the dirt. Plus you have to sometimes throw over defensive players. In baseball, longer stride is kinda encouraged, when pitching.

Taking care of you arm is a must. In football you want more than just your arm solid…so free weight is good… Baseball, using bands will do just fine…

As far as a throw/pitch count. In football…you throw as much as you need to win the GAME. Baseball, i don’t understand a pitch count personally.

In either sport, there’s nothing wrong with icing the arm down.

The spring is tough because I go from pitching a baseball to sometimes being out on the football field…it is not a natural transition. When switching, I really have to be wary of my mechanics.

JUST A PERSONAL OPINION


#29

very interesting to actually hear from someone whos doing it… now my question is what exercises are stressed for a quarterback in the weightroom? is it the same or different from other positions such as say a running back? or do the strength and conditioning coaches just want every1 strong in the same way?


#30

Here’s a link to ASMI’s take on throwing a baseball and football:

http://www.asmi.org/asmiweb/research/football.htm


#31

Caveat that I’m new to coaching baseball, but have been coaching football for basically my whole adult life. I’m going to guess that the big difference is the % of, for lack of a better term, “capacity,” pitchers and QBs put on each throw.

QBs, even professional ones, rarely throw as hard as they can, even in games. It would seem to me that pitchers are going to throw much closer to as hard as they can more often. Combine that with more games, and more throws in every game, way more wear and tear on the body.

Think about this: professional QBs at most play 19 games that matter (not counting preseason), and that’s only if they make it to the Super Bowl. Let’s pretend they’re on the high side of average at 35 per game. That’s 665 throws, with hardly any of them at “fastball” effort.

A pitcher who makes 20 starts and average 80 pitches a game will throw 1600, many of them much closer to their physical limit than the QB. And none of this includes training. Extrapolate that over an entire baseball career, compared to a football career.

That would be my guess.


#32

Wow, I just realized this was 8 years old. Sorry, I was looking for things on QB vs pitching mechanics and this popped up in Google. I should have checked dates.


#33

There are similarities and differences between passing and pitching. (How’s that for a worthless statement!).


#34

NFL quarterbacks throw the ball in the low to high 50s. One of the hardest football throws ever was Brett Favre at 63 mph. According to Dr. James Andrews, there is a definite link between velocity and UCL ruptures. This would explain why adult NFL quarterbacks throwing 50-63 do not suffer UCL ruptures, while adult MLB pitchers throwing 90-105 do suffer UCL ruptures.