Pitcher Times

I was wondering what times I should be looking at for the following. The age group is 13-15 years old.

Catchers:
Throwing time to 2B?

Pitchers:

How much time between pitches when catcher throws ball back to pitcher should the next pitch be thrown?

Pitchers time to Home Plate?

Pitchers time to pickoff at 1B?

Pitchers time to Home Plate and the Catchers time to 2B in total?

Could you explain why you want to know that particular thing? It just so happens that when I converted my stat program to a scoring program, I included a timer that measures the time in seconds from one pitch to the next, and I’m looking for ways to use that time.

Scorekeeper im not sure if you can put a number on it but the people that take to long in between pitches take there defense out of the game, I call them human rain delays and for 13 to 15 i would say from pitcher to catch to 2nd if your around a 4.2 you should be good, probably closer to 3.8 or 3.9 for the faster guys. I would check it out more though im not positive. it has more to do with the pitchers ability to keep the runner close to the bag. If they pick off and the guy dives back, pick again. keep picking till he goes in standing up. Also measure off about 13 to 14 feet from the bag and make sure your pitchers know where that is. A lead longer then that is unaccetable

You’re correct, but I’m not talking about measuring that time. I’m talking about the pitcher throwing a ball and a timer starts, and it runs until he throws another ball.

ok I got what your timing but I dont know what you would use that time for, there are so many variables that go into it (Hit, mound visit, someone having to tie there shoe, and even if the batter takes a long time to step into the box). Im sure if you measure that you would time from the time the pitcher steps onto the rubber for the pitch and I think that would be a more accurate representation of the pitchers pace, if that is what your trying to get.

Believe me, I found out really quickly that there are a lot of things that affect it. But, it doesn’t take very long to figure out what kind of “pace” the pitcher is comfortable with. It was most noticeable when during one of the playoff games Terry Francona commented about how one of the pitchers like to grab the ball and throw it again really quickly, and how that kept his fielders in the game.

So, I made it a point to look closely at those times. What was happening in fact was something Terry hadn’t noticed. When there was no one on base, the other pitcher was delivering the ball at a much faster pace, and when there were runners on, the pitcher he’d commented on darn near stopped pitching. Now why that was and how he got that perception, I don’t know, but it was interesting to be able to check.

Here’s some food for thought though. Like everything else, depending on what you’re looking at and how you’re defining it, things can look a lot different. What interests me is trying to find out what helps make a pitcher effective, and I’m guessing that depending on his style, the velocity of his pitches in relation to one another, and the length of time from one to another relative to where they were located and their break, make a great deal of difference.

FI, logically, a pitcher who depends mostly on his FB would benefit from taking a bit longer between pitches, because it would give the batter the perception that they were faster than they really were. But the quicker in succession they came, the easier it would be to time them. For a pitcher who depended on finesse more, it would be just the opposite. The less time between his FB and an OS pitch, the more difference there would be, and thus the higher chance that the batter would be deceived.

Its really just another way to look at things. As for accuracy, you’re correct. There are much more accurate ways to measure the pace, but trust me when I say, its impossible to keep score well when you’re trying to be accurate timing something taking place on the field with a stopwatch. So, what you’re saying would best be done by someone charting pitches, and that’s not something I’ll ever do as an SK, so I’ll have to settle for what I’ve got, and tweak it a bit here and there. :wink:

I’ve never thought of it like that but I really like it, so for me since im submarine and rely more on deception and movement I should work at a faster pace?

When I asked my question about times, I was just looking for numbers. Here is what I was told. If you think these numbers are wrong, feel free to tell me what you have been told or do. Remember the age group is 13 to 15.

Catchers:
Throwing time to 2B?
2.2 seconds

Pitchers:

How much time between pitches when catcher throws ball back to pitcher should the next pitch be thrown?
10 seconds

Pitchers time to Home Plate from the stretch?
1.3 seconds

Pitchers time to pickoff at 1B?
1.1 seconds

Pitchers time to Home Plate and the Catchers time to 2B in total?
3.5 seconds

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If I had to make a bet, I’d bet that you’d have better results working at a faster rather than slower pace. That’s not a guarantee, but rather an educated opinion. The trouble with it is, you have to be prepared for when the batters figger out what’s going on and do everything they can to slow you down. So its not as though you want to take as little time as possible between pitches, even though that would mean you would be most effective. You have to be willing to sacrifice just a little bit in order to not have it slapping the batters in the face. :wink:

What’s really interesting to me is, we’re not talking about a great deal of time here. Let’s say a fast paced pitcher with no runners on and batters not wandering all over the place is throwing a ball every 15 seconds. A slow one may only be every 16.5 seconds. But you be amazed at how long a second and a half is when you’re a batter waiting take a hack! :wink:

[quote=“thunderdevil”]When I asked my question about times, I was just looking for numbers. Here is what I was told. If you think these numbers are wrong, feel free to tell me what you have been told or do. Remember the age group is 13 to 15.

Catchers:
Throwing time to 2B?
2.2 seconds

Pitchers:

How much time between pitches when catcher throws ball back to pitcher should the next pitch be thrown?
10 seconds

Pitchers time to Home Plate from the stretch?
1.3 seconds

Pitchers time to pickoff at 1B?
1.1 seconds

Pitchers time to Home Plate and the Catchers time to 2B in total?
3.5 seconds

[/b][/quote]

Looks good - I’d agree with these numbers. Let’s not over-complicate the OP’s question here.

Why is it over-complicating something to try to figure out what its purpose is? For 3 of the things, its pretty easy to see their importance. They’re measurable skills with a direct relation to controlling the running game. How does how much time it takes from one pitch to the next do that, and does it matter? I can’t see how it affects the running game, but I can see how it would definitely affect hitters, and that’s all I was addressing. Is there something wrong with what I said?

Sometimes it takes more than a twitter length answer to a question to give it proper attention. Flippant answers disrespect the question and the person asking it.

I think thunderdevil was just trying to get a general idea if he is within the basic time period of what would be expected to keep runners close or have the ability to throw out a runner at second. Of course there are numberous other variables but for us to help I like the answers he gave. I agree not to overcomplicate the issue especially since the questions were for 13 - 15 yr old group.

Please explain how a pitcher taking more or less time to deliver the ball keeps a runner close. But more, please explain what has been said in this thread that a 13-15YO couldn’t or shouldn’t be expected to understand.

Being unpredictable, multiple looks to the runner, step offs, doing whatever you (as the pitcher) can do to get the runner thinking back, or that it’s not the right time to go vs go on first movement. This is the number one way to give your catcher the opportunity to throw out runners. If the runner starts slow because he isn’t sure then you have done your job.

I don’t want to comment on the overcomplicaiton of the subject since it seems to be a little touchy subject.

Found this which may be useful for you:

http://hometeamsonline.com/teams/default.asp?u=BLUEJAYBASEBALL&t=c&s=baseball&p=custom&pagename=Tests%20%26%20Measurements

j

Great link I think i remember being told similiar numbers from my College Coach