Pitcher is throwing a fastball, but it looks like a curve

I coach a pitcher who often appears to be throwing a curve ball, although he is intending to throw a fastball. What might be happening in his mechanics that would cause this. Is he throwing with his hand cocked and therefore introducing a downward spin rather than the normal backspin of a four seam fastball? Any insight would be appreciated.

Here is very early season video of the 13yr old throwing from the side. Can anyone see anything that might be causing this?

Thanks in advance.

Well his arm action has kindof a catapult action, I think his hand is ending up at release with his hand a little on the side of the ball vs being behind the ball, pulling the ball down.

As I slow it down it looks like his hand is pronating to the inside of the ball. Is that what you are seeing too? What should I be focusing on with him mechanically.

I think he is losing velocity because of this particular move. How can we help him correct it? And is what he is doing safe for his arm?

usually a little pronation is common. it certainly wouldn’t cause his ball to break like a curve however

Actually, if he’s throwing what appears to be a curveball, he probably has a natural one, and I wouldn’t be too concerned about it. It may have a natural break, and I can just imagine that the batters who have been sitting on a fast ball are fooled by what he’s throwing. What he needs to do with this pitch is learn to change speeds on it. And he might even experiment with a knuckle-curve, which is a truly devastating pitch.
As far as the fastball is concerned—which one is he throwing, a four-seamer or a two-seamer? The latter is also known as a sinker, and a lot of pitchers who have trouble with the four-seamer will do well with the other pitch. Again, don’t worry about it.
One thing he needs to do—and this will enable him to get more velocity on his pitches—is something I call “The Secret”, which I learned a long time ago from watching the Yankees’ Big Three pitchers and seeing how they did it. They all drove off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous motion, and the result was a flow of energy from the bottom all the way through the shoulder to the arm. They not only generated more power behind their pitches but also took a lot of pressure off said shoulder and arm so that they threw harder with less effort. (How not to get a sore arm.) I would advise doing some work with the “Hershiser” drill, which aims at getting the hips fully involved—the hips are the connection between the lower and upper halves of the body, and getting this connection will result in a smoother delivery and—yes, increased speed. 8) :slight_smile:

[quote]As I slow it down it looks like his hand is pronating to the inside of the ball. Is that what you are seeing too? What should I be focusing on with him mechanically.

I think he is losing velocity because of this particular move. How can we help him correct it? And is what he is doing safe for his arm?[/quote]

Correction can be just working on throwin from the knee, leading with the wrist and snapping the fingers down on the release. From the knee keeps anything else from getting involved.