Pitch signs?

Any suggestion on pitch signs for catcher to give pitcher? This is for 10-12 year olds. Was going to use one finger for fast ball and four fingers for change-up. Then second sequence of fingers will be even (ie. two or four) fingers for inside and odd fingers for outside.
Do we need much more than that at this age?

Any other suggestions or ideas?
Thanks.

Honestly, I would think that you would need FB, CU and for some kids some 3rd pitch CB or something.

So:
FB- 1 finger
CU- 2 fingers (any 2 we have liked the index and pinky, easier to see)
CB- fist

You might also need a pick off sign, usually the thumb is good for that.

Inside and outside, I would just use touching the thigh of the direction you want it, pitchers get confused on lefty vs righty directions so keep it easy. If you get picked of in a game then have it be the 2nd or even 3rd sign, or the last sign but keep it simple

Awesome information. Thank you

When I was pitching, my catcher and I decided to keep things simple. So what he did was: one finger for a slider (that was my best pitch), two fingers for a curve, three for a knuckle curve, and for any one of my wide assortment of changeups he would just position his mitt in one place or another, stick out his mitt and wait for the ball. And when I was going to use the crossfire I would signal my catcher, usually by pulling down on my cap. The only ones who had a problem with all that were the hitters. :slight_smile: :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

For my 10yr old son we have the following signs for the catcher to give:

1- 4 seam FB
2 - 2 seam FB
Fist - “Slider” (not a true slider at his age but a modified pitch)
3 fingers with (thumb & index finger forming a circle) for his circle change up

Inside or outside is a touch of the catcher’s thigh.

Hope that helps.

We still don’t use signs, since every pitch is the two-seamer. But the advice of one finger, two finder, fist, etc are good. :slight_smile:

1-4 = four seam
1-2= two seam
2-1= curve
2-2= knuckle curve
3-1= slider
3-2= sinker
4-1=change up
4 wiggle = knuckle ball
5 = shake your head
Fist=pitch out

To pick off, have the catcher drop the fingers of the glove straight down to signal best time to throw over. Have catcher put up both hands to step off the mound and check the runners.

Hi Spike

Been working a lot with the 10-12 y/o pitchers the last few years and here the signs that seem to have worked good for us.

1 finger= 4 seam

2 fingers (pointer and pinkie) = 2 seam

fist = change up

pointer and middle finger wiggle like scissors= cutter (or type of cut fastball I show a few kids)

like a previous poster said tap the left or right shin guard for inside or outside.

point up and catcher stands late to waist one high… be sure your pitcher knows to throw high (out of good connection high) to get that free swinging fastball hitter

And if you have that exceptional young pitcher with the awesome control… we will give a thumbs up (shake wrist) with a two strike count like 1 and 2 or 0 and 2… the catcher shows the batter he is setting up inside then last second he jumps to outside for the pitcher to throw a low and away change or the little cutter. A year ago when my boy would be catching and a certain little 11 y/o was on the mound they struck out so many kids that year doing this it was sick.

Lastly catcher lightly rubs dirt with glove … pitcher better be wasting one low.

Obviously the last few things mentioned will only be for a select few pitchers at this age.

hope this helps as it has worked very good for me the last several years

dman

[quote]1-4 = four seam
1-2= two seam
2-1= curve
2-2= knuckle curve
3-1= slider
3-2= sinker
4-1=change up
4 wiggle = knuckle ball
5 = shake your head
Fist=pitch out

To pick off, have the catcher drop the fingers of the glove straight down to signal best time to throw over. Have catcher put up both hands to step off the mound and check the runners.[/quote]

Don’t you think that is a bit much for 10 to 12 year olds?

Best bet is to keep it simple and progress as they get older.

Each kid is different. If they can retain it, teach it. If not, scale it back. I never make assumptions that a kid learning algebra can’t differentiate a handful of signs.

I don’t think he was talking about number of signs…more how many pitches the players are throwing!

Right you are, bu.

I’m still trying to get an answer from spindoctor the age of the kids he’s “coaching”.

I think the question is does anyone really need 8 pitches and if the individual pitcher only throws 3-4 then why have 8 signs for the pitches. Most of the time a pitcher and catcher only need 5 seconds to get down the off speed, what it is and how the catcher will call it…the rest is fairly simple…fastball, change etc. Looks like the plan spinmaster has is quite in depth and would take away from what I would consider time that would be better spent elsewhere…just my opinion!

Not that each pitcher has 8 pitches. Some have only two, but I prefer that a change up is not a 2 for one kid and a 4 for another. Catchers don’t have different signs for each pitcher this way. Also makes it easier for me as a coach to call a pitch here or there without potential for a cross up.

For 10-12 year olds? How about this:

1= fastball

:smiley:

+1 :slight_smile:

Me too!!!

What?

Spin doctor, your name speaks for itself. None of what you’ve posted makes sense.

Please can you tell us what age you are coaching? And please clarify your logic for all the signs and pitches.

[quote=“spinmaster”]1-4 = four seam
1-2= two seam
2-1= curve
2-2= knuckle curve
3-1= slider
3-2= sinker
4-1=change up
4 wiggle = knuckle ball
5 = shake your head
Fist=pitch out [/quote]

Spin, what about:

splitter
cutter
forkball
vulcan
screw ball
gyroball
epheus

13-15 years is the age group and this is actually simplified. With runners on base there are also extra signs that don’t mean anything so runners on base can’t relay the pitch to the batter. I also like how everyone is attacking my system and myself.

Don’t be haters.

Turd double deuce, you can’t get my name right, so I don’t wonder why you don’t understand.